Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • "death metal" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
American negativity and rap/metal in the age of supercapitalism
Author: Scott Wilson

The seductive force of American supercapitalism unlocks new markets, unleashing the energy of desire, and provides a destructive version of Satan's rage. At the vanguard of this seduction has been the youthful rage and rebellion of the devil's music, American rock 'n' roll and its multiple related subgenres. This book looks at the most pervasive forms of American popular music in the post-cold-war period. Gangsta rap exploits and informs the consumption of luxury brands. The 'mom and pop rage' of the nu metal bands self-consciously exposes itself as the violent expression, the excess of the implacable banal excess, and of shopping-mall consumerism. The book explores the negativity and the 'niggativity' of American rap/metal in the 1990s in relation to a number of key events in the decade such as the Rodney King riots and the Columbine High School massacre. On the face of it, the gangsta 'nigga' is an unlikely point of identification for suburban white culture. But the phenomenon of the 'wigga' (white, wanna-be-nigga) and the success of companies like Nike testify to the fascination that such a figure holds. Rage Against the Machine (also known as Rage or RATM) do not normally have problems with machines, indeed their music and living depend upon them. Rather, the 'machine' is for Rage another word for the new world order of global capitalism. Death metal groups such as Morbid Angel and Deicide aim to outdo the others in its singular relation to death, shock and outrage.

Abstract only
Scott Wilson

, evident in the original fiction itself, is nevertheless completely in accord with the ‘unregulated cruelty of the universe, the cruelty of famine, of a hopeless sadism: God’s unfathomable taste for the extreme suffering of his creatures, suffocating and dishonoring them’ (Bataille, 2001: 197). The contemplation of a horrible death is an unlikely topic for most mainstream pop songs, but is actually very common in some genres of metal, particularly death metal, with which Slipknot has many affinities. Moreover, such material is not offered for quiet contemplation, as in a

in Great Satan’s rage
Abstract only
Scott Wilson

was to Paul Wolfowitz in 1999. That is to say they are opposed, but also bound, negatively, by a shared ambivalence towards the culture they inhabit. The choice of music, as opposed to art, literature or film, to explore the 6 Great Satan’s rage negativity of American political culture and its relation to supercapitalism is appropriate for a number of reasons. First, gangsta rap and nu and death metal, the forms discussed, are exemplary expressions of the creative negativity of supercapitalism, particularly when such expressions contest and expose the limits of

in Great Satan’s rage
Youth, pop and the rise of Madchester
Author: Steve Redhead

Madchester may have been born at the Haçienda in the summer of 1988, but the city had been in creative ferment for almost a decade prior to the rise of Acid House. The End-of-the-Century Party is the definitive account of a generational shift in popular music and youth culture, what it meant and what it led to. First published right after the Second Summer of Love, it tells the story of the transition from New Pop to the Political Pop of the mid-1980s and its deviant offspring, Post-Political Pop. Resisting contemporary proclamations about the end of youth culture and the rise of a new, right-leaning conformism, the book draws on interviews with DJs, record company bosses, musicians, producers and fans to outline a clear transition in pop thinking, a move from an obsession with style, packaging and synthetic sounds to content, socially conscious lyrics and a new authenticity.

This edition is framed by a prologue by Tara Brabazon, which asks how we can reclaim the spirit, energy and authenticity of Madchester for a post-youth, post-pop generation. It is illustrated with iconic photographs by Kevin Cummins.

Abstract only
Chris Bundock and Elizabeth Effinger

iterations than in contemporary music. Blake has inspired the goth band Mephisto Waltz (Track 5. ‘The Tyger’, Immersion [2001]), and the black/death metal band Thelema, whose album Fearful Symmetry (2008) includes tracks with Blakean titles such as ‘The Fly’, ‘Tyger’, ‘The Crystal Cabinet’, and ‘The Human Abstract’. With tracks like ‘We Sleep’, ‘Blind to the World’, and ‘The Machine’ the technical thrash metal band Blake

in William Blake's Gothic imagination
Abstract only
Scott Wilson

-co-immunity, constituting it as such in its iterability, its heritage, its spectral tradition’ (Derrida, 2002: 86–7): ‘Killers are quiet like the Great Satan’s rage 156 breath of the wind’ (Slipknot, ‘Killers are Quiet’, 1998). In their emphasis on serial killers and death, but also musically, Slipknot are close to the death metal genre and bands like Carcass, Morbid Angel and Immortal. Death metal is contemporary with the negative turn in hip hop and follows a more extreme trajectory than nu metal, as we will see in the next chapter. Notes 1 2 3 As Keith Ansell-Pearson argues

in Great Satan’s rage
Abstract only
From protest to resistance
Matthew Worley, Keith Gildart, Anna Gough-Yates, Sian Lincoln, and Bill Osgerby

History of Punk and Underground Resources in Turkey 1978–99 (Athens: BAS, 2007).    8 For a non-Western focus, see E. Baulch, Making Scenes: Reggae, Punk and Death Metal in 1990s Bali (London: Duke University Press, 2007); J. Matsue, Making Music in Japan’s Underground: The Tokyo Hardcore Scene (London: Routledge, 2009); A. O’Connor, ‘Punk Subculture in Mexico and the Anti-globalisation Movement: A Report from the Front’, New Political Science, 25:1 (2003), 43–53. Also, Beijing Bubbles: Punk and Rock in China’s Capital (directed by George Lindt and Susanne Messmer

in Fight back
Abstract only
Scott Wilson

death metal, into nu metal. Nu metal expunged the melodic element of Nirvana’s Nevermind which enriched and embarrassed Cobain, having more in common with the raw energy of Bleach. Nu metal locates itself squarely in the contradiction that Mullholland identifies between the desire for teenage rebellion and its commodification. The contradictory desire to make it, but not sell out. The shameful acknowledgment of that desire is expressed along with an awareness of its belatedness and idiocy marked by contempt for the parental baby-boom generation that it defined. The

in Great Satan’s rage
Abstract only
David Annwn Jones

identities: a collective, a people, a race, a nation, heavy metal, black metal, gothic – all of which celebrate brutality, or in a highly artificial way, the symbolism of death and destruction’ (cited in Tucker, 2014 ). As related above, as well as the link with Gothic music, with its folk and metal variants, and Nordic death metal scene, Gothic lettering, because of its use in early books, is also

in Gothic effigy
Abstract only
Episodic erotics and generic structures in Ventura Pons’s ‘Minimalist Trilogy’
David Scott Diffrient

testicles and slamming the salad bowl against his head, she tells him to go fetch the ingredients for their dinner. Following this violent skirmish is the first of many interstitials in which the camera takes us racing through the streets of Barcelona at night, here accompanied by sped-up death-metal music. As a linking device between two episodes, this and the other in-between scenes, which pepper the entire

in Contemporary Spanish cinema and genre