150 Chapter 7 General Recommendation 34: a contribution to the visibility and inclusion of Afro-​descendants in Latin America Pastor Murillo and Esther Ojulari Introduction In a context of mestizo1 national identities and the ‘myth of racial democracy’,2 the issue of racial discrimination was largely denied in many Latin American countries for much of the twentieth century. Reflecting this, Afro-​descendants were an ‘invisible group’ within international law, with no specific norms or mechanisms responding to their particular rights claims until the twenty

in Fifty years of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination
Conservative modernity and the female crime novel

2 Josephine Tey and her descendants: conservative modernity and the female crime novel Cora Kaplan Crime fiction has always thrived on the narrative possibilities of the social and political landscapes of modernity, building its plots on the real and imagined violence that change seems always to threaten. In Britain the male-authored thriller dominated the first two decades of the twentieth century, but from the 1920s onwards women writers led the genre, making a speciality of detective novels. Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers and Josephine Tey are now the

in End of empire and the English novel since 1945
Transnational dynamics in post-genocidal restitutions

Taking its starting point from a socio-anthropological study combining biographical interviews, semi-structured interviews and ethnographic observations collected between 2016 and 2018 in Germany, France and the United States among Ovaherero and Nama activists, and also members of different institutions and associations, this article focuses on the question of human remains in the current struggle for recognition and reparation of the genocide of the Ovaherero and Nama from a transnational perspective. First, the text shows the ways in which the memory of human remains can be considered as a driving force in the struggle of the affected communities. Second, it outlines the main points of mismatches of perspective between descendants of the survivors and the responsible museums during past restitutions of human remains from German anthropological collections. Third, the article more closely examines the resources of Ovaherero in the United States in the struggle for recognition and reparation, the recent discovery of Namibian human remains in the American Museum of Natural History in New York City and the questions that it raises.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal

This article describes the powerplay around the recent discovery (summer 2015) of eighteenth-century Jewish graves in the French city of Lyon. Prior to the French Revolution, Jews had no right to have their own cemeteries, and the corpses of the deceased were buried in the basement of the local catholic hospital, the Hôtel- Dieu. In recent years this centrally located building was completely renovated and converted into a retail complex selling luxury brands. The discovery and subsequent identification of the graves – and of some human remains – led to a complex confrontation between various actors: archaeologists, employed either by the municipality or by the state; religious authorities (mostly Lyons chief rabbi); the municipality itself; the private construction companies involved; direct descendants of some of the Jews buried in the hospital‘s basement; as well as the local media. The question of what to do with the graves took centre stage, and while exhumations were favoured by both archaeologists and the representatives of the families, the chief rabbi – supported by the construction companies – proved reluctant to exhume, for religious reasons. In the first part of his article the author details the origins of this Jewish funerary place and current knowledge about it. He then goes on to analyse what was at stake in the long negotiations, arguing that the memory of the Holocaust played a role in the attitude of many of the parties involved. By way of conclusion he considers the decision not to exhume the graves and elaborates on the reasons why this led to some dissatisfaction.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal

Radio versions, drawn from the film not the preceding play, attracted many well-known actors. There were also two plays and an opera bearing the film’s title and narrative outline, the opera stage perhaps less amenable to the intimacy that was part of the film’s appeal. The Kneehigh Company’s production was especially imaginative in its use of mixed-media resources. The TV film, Staying On, saw Johnson and Howard reunited in an Indian-set tale with some details that recall the old film, at least for the cognoscenti.

in The never-ending Brief Encounter

Brian McFarlane’s The never-ending Brief Encounter is above all a book intended for those who have seen and never forgotten the famous 1945 film in which two decent, middle-class people meet by chance, unexpectedly fall in love, but in the end acknowledge the claims of others. The book grew out of an article, the writing of which revealed that there was so much more to the after-life of the film than the author had realised. This book examines David Lean’s film in sufficient detail to bring its key situations vividly to life, and to give an understanding of how it reworks Nöel Coward’s somewhat static one-act play to profound effect. It also examines the ways in which the ‘comic relief’ is made to work towards the poignant ending. However, the main purpose of the book is to consider the remarkable after-life the film has given rise to. The most specific examples of this phenomenon are, of course, the appalling film remake with its miscast stars, and the later stage versions – both bearing the original title and attracting well-known players and positive audience and critical response – and an opera! As well, there are films and TV series which have ‘quoted’ the film (usually via black-and-white inserts) as commentary on the action of the film or series. There are many other films that, without direct quotation, seem clearly to be echoing their famous predecessor; for example, in the haunting visual quality of a deserted railway platform.

Young people of North African origin in France

France has an established reputation as a country of immigration and has received numerous waves of immigrants from the nineteenth century onwards. This book aims to focus on one of these immigrant groups or, rather, on the French-born descendants of North African immigrants of Muslim origin. It looks at three levels of discourse relating to North African immigrants and their descendants. First, the increasingly politicised issue of immigration in France since the 1980s can be seen as just one level of discourse concerning North African immigrants and their descendants. A second level of discourse can be found in the intellectual debates of the last twenty-five years, which have often taken on a rather ideological character. One of the central ideas underpinning the book is the notion of a disjuncture between the main preoccupations of the public and intellectual debates and the experiences of the people concerned. Therefore, by studying the construction of identity among young people of North African origin, the book aims to concentrate on the register of experience. That is, by adopting an empirical or a 'bottom-up' approach, the apparent disjuncture between the various discourses about young people of North African origin and their experiences can be addressed. The views expressed by the young people themselves can be regarded as the third layer of 'discourse' to be examined in the book.

generations of Polish historians and antiquaries from assigning Greco-Roman identities to local monuments. They were keen to offer tangible proof of the past glory of the land inhabited by the alleged descendants of the Sarmatians. In this chapter I will explore some of these monuments and the narratives constructed around them as a part of the ideology of Sarmatism: a class discourse that constructed an identity for the Polish nobility as the descendants of the ancient Sarmatians, that is, the ancient nomadic tribe of Iranian origin that moved gradually from the Caspian

in Local antiquities, local identities
Abstract only
New Place, 1677–1759

been gifted New Place in 1702 (Styles, 1945 : 258–66). Sir John Clopton and New Place Sir John was a direct descendant of Hugh Clopton, so, in 1677, the ownership of New Place reverted into the hands of a descendant of the original builder. Sir John, however, proceeded to remove all trace of Shakespeare’s house and construct an entirely new, more

in Finding Shakespeare’s New Place
A new approach

and for many years was president of the St Vincent de Paul Society. The deceased, who was twice married, has eight children living.2 Patrick Mannion and Bartholomew Corcoran were Irish. They had left Ireland in the 1850s and settled in Stafford, a small town in the English West Midlands. They were just two individuals in the great wave of 1 2 Divergent paths emigration that by 1900 meant more Irish people lived outside Ireland than in the country itself. Irish emigrants and their descendants were to be found in most parts of Britain, the United States

in Divergent paths