Diaspora space and the devolution of literary culture

Postcolonial Manchester offers a radical new perspective on Britain's devolved literary cultures by focusing on Manchester's vibrant, multicultural literary scene. This book presents the North West of England as quintessential 'diaspora space' and contributes to a better understanding of the region in social, cultural and aesthetic terms. It examines the way in which stories, poems and plays set in locales such as 'the Curry Mile' and Moss Side, have attempted to reshape Manchester's collective visions. The book features a broad demographic of authors and texts emanating from different diasporic communities and representing a wide range of religious affiliations. Manchester's black and Asian writers have struggled to achieve recognition within the literary mainstream, partly as a result of exclusion from London-centric, transnational publishing houses. Manchester's unfortunate reputation as one of Britain's 'crime capitals' is analysed by the use of fiction to stretch and complicate more popular explanations. A historical overview of Manchester's literary anthologies is presented through a transition from a writing that paid tribute to political resistance to more complex political statements, and focuses on the short story as a literary mode. The book combines close readings of some of the city's best-known performance poets such as Lemn Sissay and SuAndi with analysis of the literary cultures that have both facilitated and challenged their art. The book affords readers the opportunity to hear many of the chapter authors 'in their own words' by reflecting on how they themselves in terms of the literary mainstream and their identities.

Mary J. Hickman

families and communities? I want to explore the implication of these comments more fully in two ways. First by examining the complexity and hybridity of different diaspora spaces to which the Irish have emigrated. Greater understanding of Ireland and Irishness involves greater knowledge of the complexity of the diaspora. This complexity in part is due to the different contexts of national formation in which settlement has taken place. Second, I want to look at who is taken as belonging in Ireland and how traditional views on this are being challenged. In particular, I

in Are the Irish different?
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William Trevor’s portrayals of the Irish in London during the Troubles
Tony Murray

families and between neighbours and co-workers in London were forged in the political and social crucible of the Troubles. The ambiguous position and complex negotiations of identity that migrant communities experience more generally have been a topic of considerable interest in the social sciences for many years.15 The work of Avtar Brah and, in particular, her concept of ‘diaspora space’ has found wide application in recent times.16 For Brah, diaspora space involves the ‘entanglement of genealogies of dispersion with those of “staying put”’.17 By those who ‘stay put

in The Northern Ireland Troubles in Britain
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

histories and crucibles of diasporic trajectories “where Europe is not at ‘the center’ – which retain a critical bearing on understanding contemporary diasporic formations and their inter-relationships.” Thus, it is necessary to deploy “diaspora space,” which is a concept introduced by Avtar Brah ( 1996 ) to explore the lateral connections between diasporas – the ways “in which

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

Chapter six draws from empirical evidence to interrogate how Afro-Caribbean-Canadians embody multiple hybridized national identities, and at the same time use dominant discourses to draw boundaries around national identities that are supposedly pure. The family and friendship ties of cricketers lead them to regularly frequent their nations of origin in the Caribbean, or Caribbean spaces in United States and England. It is during these visits that they share national iconography and symbols such as a Maple Leaf pin (Canada), or curry goat (Jamaica), which is central to the attempts to fix and celebrate national boundaries and identities. The Mavericks come to know themselves as more (and sometimes less) Canadian or Barbadian through their interactions and interminglings with Barbadian players from England. The purpose of this chapter is to highlight the relationships among deterritorialized communities that share plurilocal homelands, and the interpellations of geo-political regimes whose narratives are powerful enough to embrace and alienate at the same time. This chapter shows how nation of origin and Canadian nationalisms are reinforced in transnational, diaspora spaces.

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
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Irish diaspora studies and women: theories, concepts and new perspectives
D. A. J. MacPherson and Mary J. Hickman

diaspora that stresses the multiple belongings of identity, where it is possible to be from one place but of many others.18 Avtar Brah’s concept of ‘diaspora space’ captures the hybrid nature of diasporic identity that connects these multiple locations. Brah suggests that in the process of the encounter and mixing of different migrant identities with those of the long-term settled, a place of settlement such as Britain becomes a diaspora space in which ‘the genealogies of dispersion’ are intertwined with ‘those of “staying put”’.19 In an Irish context, Mary Hickman has

in Women and Irish diaspora identities
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Manchester and the devolution of British literary culture
Corinne Fowler and Lynne Pearce

scholars around the globe for the best part of thirty years, with our understanding of post/colonialism’s reach and complexity becoming ever more nuanced and, arguably, ever more disturbing. ‘Diaspora space’, a term coined by Avtar Brah in her ground-breaking volume Cartographies of Diaspora (1996), represents one such political and theoretical leap forward inasmuch as it compelled scholars, working across the arts and social sciences, to move beyond a binary that posited the world’s diasporas as ‘others’ superimposed upon a pre-existing national or social order and the

in Postcolonial Manchester
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D. A. J. MacPherson

create with home. Perhaps most intriguingly, the Orangewomen studied in this book demonstrate how the homeland itself, and those who do not become migrants, are shaped by diaspora and are part of this diasporic continuum. Avtar Brah’s concept of ‘diaspora space’ captures the hybrid nature of diasporic identity that connects these multiple locations. Brah suggests that in the process of the encounter and mixing of different migrant identities with those of the long-term settled, a place of settlement such as Britain becomes a diaspora space in which ‘the genealogies of

in Women and the Orange Order
Breda Gray

paradoxically renders Irish identity in the diaspora inauthentic.58 Such disjunctures and politics of boundary-making within and across groups, as well as between groups, are central to the politics of diaspora. While the emphasis is on fluidity and hybridity, such lateral situational 39 M&H 02_Tonra 01 08/04/2014 07:14 Page 40 40 Women and Irish diaspora identities readings of diaspora help unravel the micro/macro power relations that underpin the policing of boundaries and (im)permissible hybridisations in what Avtar Brah calls ‘diaspora space’.59 Like queer studies

in Women and Irish diaspora identities
Orangewomen in Canada, c. 1890–1930
D. A. J. MacPherson

world that remained focused on Ireland well into the twentieth century. Drawing on Avtar Brah’s concept of ‘diaspora space’, this chapter considers the imagined space of the Toronto Sentinel. Here, Orangewomen would read about the Irish backgrounds of members of the LOBA, their visits ‘back home’ to Ireland and Scotland and the continuing importance of Irish politics to a sense of Orange identity in Canada.8 Through the pages of the Orange press, Orangewomen in Canada experienced a networked sense of empire and Irish Protestant diaspora.9 This chapter also has

in Women and Irish diaspora identities