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Global conversations on refuge

At a time when the world is faced with an unprecedented and growing number of people being displaced around the world, scholars strive to make sense of what appear to be constantly unfolding “crises.” These attempts, however, often operate within niche and increasingly fragmented fields, thus making it difficult to develop a historically nuanced and theoretically informed understanding of how forced displacement is produced, managed, and experienced globally and locally. To advance such an understanding, this book offers an interdisciplinary and transnational approach to thinking about structures, spaces, and lived experiences of displacement. This is a collective effort by sociologists, geographers, anthropologists, political scientists, historians, and migration studies scholars to develop new cross-regional conversations and theoretically innovative vocabularies in the work on forced displacement. We engage in a historical, transnational, interdisciplinary dialogue to offer different ways of theorizing about refugees, internally displaced persons, stateless people, and others that have been forcibly displaced. Our work opens critical discussions of forced displacement, drawing it together with other contemporary issues in different disciplines such as urbanization, securitization, race, and imperialism. The book brings together different regions and countries into dialogue with each other – from Latin America, to sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, North America, South and Southeast Asia. The book, while being of particular interest to scholars of forced migration, will be an important text for those interested in studying the intersection between displacement and contemporary political, social, and economic issues.

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The loss and making of place in Colombia

Focusing on two cases of resettlement in rural Cundinamarca, Colombia, this book examines how displaced campesinos (peasants) make sense of their displacement. The book is based on ten months of fieldwork employing ethnographic methods working, living and sharing with the displaced and the receiving populations. The book calls for a more nuanced understanding of displacement and suggests that people’s complex experiences are best understood through the prism of place, examining people’s lives both pre- and post- physical relocation. The core of the book draws on people’s narratives which are embedded in the broader socio-political and historic context of the country. These narratives depict life in violence and terror, the journeys to the current hamlets, the burden, consequences and the symbolism associated with the category desplazado (internally displaced person), the process of place negotiation between the displaced and the receiving populations who each claim their right to belonging, the challenges the displaced encounter in their attempts to tame unknown terrains, and how the nostalgic memories of the place left behind and the still present fear shape individuals’ lives. The gradual loss of place to violence and terror and subsequent process of place-making after uprooting demonstrate that displacement is not an event which starts with movement and ends with resettlement or return, but is a process whose timeframes are difficult to define.

Re-reading Hannah Arendt to instil critical thought in the Colombian refugee crisis
Ulrich Oslender

(CODHES, 2014 ; IDMC, 2014 ). Different from many other refugee crises in the world that put certain countries temporarily on the map as ‘displacement hotspots’, the crisis in Colombia has been evolving at a slower, yet creepingly consistent pace. This trend is less characterised by spectacular displacements resulting from large-scale bombing and military campaigns – such as in Syria, Sudan, Iraq, etc. – but by the smaller scale, yet unceasing removal of people from their lands. Displacement has become such a persistent feature in society that Colombians seemingly

in Displacement
The temporality of dwelling for displaced Georgians
Cathrine Brun and Ragne Øwre Thorshaug

's afterlife as a Soviet era student dorm and then as a collective center continues to affect everyday lives. Understanding protracted displacement through the dwelling More and more refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) live outside the traditional humanitarian spaces of the camp and predominantly in urban areas. Accompanying this trend is a policy shift away from focusing on camps to increased emphasis on assisting people living in urban areas. In this context, there is a need to better understand the nature of current

in Displacement
IDP community under question
Mateja Celestina

96 7 Displacement hierarchies: IDP community under question After the first run of vote counting, Don Eduardo did not get a place in the local council. Before the election a number of candidates invited their relatives to register their cédulas (identification documents) in the municipality where they did not normally live to be able to cast a vote for their family member. Some political parties allegedly organised transportation for people to come from elsewhere and vote for their representative or they paid for people’s expenses. Even though some of Don

in Living displacement
Mateja Celestina

33 3 Displacement as an unwinding process Speaking of displacement, Alejandra remembers the disappearance of her mother at the end of the 1980s. Only one of her mother’s shoes, a sandal, was found at the entrance of the house –​all other traces were lost. Alejandra, who is now in her early thirties, was nine years old when her mother vanished. Her mother’s friend, Martina, took her in but she treated her differently to her own four children. As a result Alejandra feels she never had childhood. She dreams of going back to Urabá, but not so much to the place

in Living displacement
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Global conversations on refuge
Silvia Pasquetti and Romola Sanyal

studies” that were both attentive to histories of displacement and crossed disciplinary boundaries. This book is thus a political project founded on an effort to create new avenues for theorizing about forced migration. Rather than summarizing developments around it, our aim is to encourage analyses of refugee situations that trace and compare historical trajectories of displacement and refuge, to promote interdisciplinary dialogue on the complex nature of forced migration, and to think more creatively about the processes, politics, and experiences

in Displacement
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Maritime Palestine displaced
Diana Allan

the 1948 displacement, in particular to one of its lesser-known chapters. With the Israel–Palestine conflict understood to be over territory, it is unsurprising that the Nakba – the term used by Palestinians to describe the 1948 expulsion, literally “the catastrophe” – itself is remembered and represented, iconically, as a flight by land. But it was also a flight by sea, a dispersal between shores by boat, a tracing of watery webs across the Mediterranean, or the “White Sea” as it is known to Arabs. Those webs remained taut and supple in voices and bodies, in the

in Displacement
The perils of promoting durable protection in cities of the south
Caroline Wanjiku Kihato and Loren B. Landau

negotiating inclusion exists. Approach This chapter brings together discussions of global humanitarian norms with a perspective rooted in the politics of local governance and humanitarian action. While there is little published work explicitly discussing the role of local authorities in addressing migration or displacement in the developing world, what exists nonetheless offers considerable guidance on the degree to which states and global legal norms govern local institutions (Edwards et al., 2014 ; Kimble et al., 2012 ; Landau et

in Displacement
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End of displacement?
Mateja Celestina

159 11 Conclusion: end of displacement? ‘We are desplazados for life,’ said Carlita, 11  years old, born and raised in Esperanza. After four years of peace negotiations between the government led by Juan Manuel Santos and the FARC, the two parties signed a peace accord in November 2016. In February 2017, Santos’ administration additionally started official negotiations with ELN. Peace negotiations with the guerrilla groups are long due and are a welcome change to the previous government’s announcement of the guerrillas as terrorists and subsequent declaration

in Living displacement