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Catherine Millet, Virginie Despentes
Victoria Best and Martin Crowley

promiscuous sexual activity. The stakes of aesthetic contact are here raised, as the work confronts readers with the question of the extent to which the individual whose intimate experiences we are following is the Catherine Millet whose name appears on its cover. Rather than salacious confession or self-seeking exhibitionism, the book has as a driving concern the question of the kinds of distance it is or is not possible to

in The new pornographies
James Zborowski

2 Distance, representation and criticism This chapter provides a link between the principal focus upon point of view in the previous chapter, and the principal focus upon communication in the chapter to follow. To treat artworks as comprising spectrums or axes of distance has been demonstrated, as we shall shortly see, to be a powerful way of conceptualising how point of view works within them. After a survey of a range of existing approaches to point of view and distance from within and beyond film studies, I explore the handling of point of view and distance

in Classical Hollywood cinema
Janice Norwood

5 Long-distance colonial touring The challenges of touring in North America were magnified for those intrepid actresses who took their theatrical skills further afield, to Australia and the colonies. Among those doing so in the 1860s were Don and Cleveland. Don played Australia and Tasmania with her husband in 1860–62, returning for a two-year solo tour in June 1864 (this time also visiting New Zealand) prior to spending a year in the US. This second visit overlapped with Cleveland’s, who was in Australia and New Zealand for just over six years from February 1864

in Victorian touring actresses
Debates over cultural conventions in French punk
Jonathyne Briggs

7 Distortions in distance: debates over cultural conventions in French punk Jonathyne Briggs On 6 May 1968, a cadre of French police entered the Sorbonne to restore order, called by administrators in response to the alleged destruction of auditorium chairs, three to be exact, caused by the student occupation that began earlier that weekend in protest against the actions of administrators at the Nanterre campus. The subsequent mêlée between the police and students sparked broader protests, as young workers instigated a series of strikes through France during the

in Fight back
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Defining the Relationships between Gothic and the Postcolonial
William Hughes and Andrew Smith

The Gothic has historically maintained an intimacy with colonial issues, and in consequence with the potential for disruption and redefinition vested in the relationships between Self and Other, controlling and repressed, subaltern milieu and dominant outsider culture. Such things are the context of obvious, visible irruptions of the colonial Orientalist exotic into the genre, whether these be the absolutist power and pagan excesses of Beckford‘s Vathek (1786), the Moorish demonic temptations of Zofloya (1806) or the perverse, corrupting influence of a western invader upon a primitivised European in the ImmaleeIsadora episodes of Maturin‘s Melmoth the Wanderer (1820). These are, in a sense, horrors beyond, the exoticism of time and space distancing the problematic text from the comfortable, identifiable world of the contemporary and the homely a reassurance comforting even in a reading of the Irish episodes of Melmoth the Wanderer, where geographical marginality anticipates a borderland as distant from metropolitan sensibilities as effective as those of later writers such as Hope Hodgson, Machen or Rolt. The colonial is both kept at a distance and in a state of suggestive vagueness, of resemblance rather than obvious representation, its horrors accessible though thankfully not immanent.

Gothic Studies
Nathaniel Leach

This article argues that Charles Maturins Melmoth the Wanderer embodies an ethical attitude towards its representations of Gothic violence and horror in the way that it self-reflexively stages its horrific scenes. By confronting its readers with a shifting distance from such violent scenes, the novel exposes readers to their own desire for and victimization by Gothic horror. While previous critics have tended to see Maturins novel as either glorying amorally in its excessive Gothic representations, or as recuperating its scenes of horror with a moral message, this article sees its ambiguous and undecidable attitude towards these scenes as embodying its ethical standpoint, a standpoint that challenges the illusion of literary coherence and that exposes its readers’ implication in the horror that lies traumatically within, and not safely outside, language.

Gothic Studies
The Experience of Dislocated Listening
Rashida K. Braggs

“It is only in his music [. . .] that the Negro in America has been able to tell his story. It is a story which otherwise has yet to be told and which no American is prepared to hear,” so wrote James Baldwin in “Many Thousands Gone.” Throughout his career, James Baldwin returned to this incomprehension of African-American experience. He continually privileged music in his literature, crafting his own literary blues to address it. Baldwin’s blues resonated even more powerfully and painfully for its emotional and geographical dislocation. In this article, Rashida K. Braggs argues that it was the combination of music, word, and migration that prompted Baldwin’s own deeper understanding. Exploring her term dislocated listening, Braggs investigates how listening to music while willfully dislocated from one’s cultural home prompts a deeper understanding of African-American experience. The distance disconcerts, leaving one more vulnerable, while music impels the reader, audience, and even Baldwin to identify with some harsh realities of African-American experience. Baldwin evokes the experience of dislocated listening in his life and in “Sonny’s Blues.” Braggs also creates an experience of dislocated listening through her video performance of Baldwin’s words, thus attempting to draw the reader as well into a more attuned understanding of African-American experience.

James Baldwin Review
James Baldwin’s Just Above My Head
Jenny M. James

This article considers James Baldwin’s last published novel, Just Above My Head (1979), as the culmination of his exploration of kinship, reflecting on the ways distance and loss characterize African-American familial relations. By analyzing Baldwin’s representation of Hall Montana’s relationship to, and mourning of, his younger brother Arthur, this article argues that JAMH revises the terms of the black family to imagine an alternative, errant kinship that is adoptive, migratory, and sustained through songs of joy and grief. My approach to the novel’s portrayal of kinship is indebted to Édouard Glissant’s Poetics of Relation (1990), in which he defines “errantry” as a fundamental characteristic of diaspora that resists the claustrophobic, filial violence and territorial dispossession that are slavery’s legacies. Baldwin represents errant kinship in JAMH through his inclusion of music and formal experimentation. Departing from previous scholarship that reads JAMH as emblematic of the author’s artistic decline, I interpret the novel’s numerous syntactic and figurative experiments as offering new formal insight into his portrait of brotherly love. Baldwin’s integration of two distinctive leitmotifs, blood and song, is therefore read as a formal gesture toward a more capacious and migratory kinship.

James Baldwin Review
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Epistemology and Revolution in Charles Brockden Brown‘s Wieland
David Smith

In Wieland, Charles Brockden Brown attempted to negotiate varying forces confronting contemporary American religious and political life. Through the transformation of the temple into a Gothic zone Brown injects questions of epistemological uncertainty, clashing forces of rational Enlightenment and supernatural faith. Brown outlines the religiously motivated founding of the nation reacting to European oppression as allegorical to the Wieland patriarchs journey from the Old to New World, and his construction of the temple demonstrates the establishment of new institutions in the American landscape. Religious liberty turns into extremism, producing Gothic violence that transforms the temple into a site of horror and destruction. His children attempt to re-transform the temple along rational Enlightenment lines much the same as Brown perceived the need for America to distance itself from its revolutionary and religious extremist origins. Yet the failure of rationalism to expunge the supernatural aura from the temple allows for the tragic events to transpire that comprise the bulk of the novel. Ultimately, Brown‘s Gothic novel evinces the critical nature of the epistemological clash he sees taking place for the direction America will take, and his concerns that Gothic violence will reverberate throughout future generations find their expression in Wieland‘s temple.

Gothic Studies
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

divides of languages but also to allow deeper ethical engagement: an ethics of exchange ( O’Mathúna and Hunt, 2019 ). Writing about the act of translation, Ricoeur articulated the concept of linguistic hospitality as an ‘act of inhabiting the word of the Other, paralleled by the act of receiving the word of the Other into one’s own home, one’s own dwelling’ ( 2007 : xvi). Humanitarian aid entails overcoming distances

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs