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County Galway and the Irish Free State 1922–32
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This book focuses on the historical debate beyond the Irish revolution and introduces a new study of post-revolutionary experience in Ireland at a county level. It begins to build an image of regional political and social life in the immediate post-revolutionary period. The book discusses the turbulent years of 1922 and 1923, the local electorate's endorsement of the Anglo-Irish Treaty and the beginning of domestic Irish politics in what was a vastly altered post-treaty world. The Anglo-Irish Treaty was signed in London and confirmed dominion status on a twenty-six-county Irish Free State. The book further examines four major themes in rural agrarian society: land, poverty, Irish language, and law and order. It establishes the level of deprivation in local society that the Cumann na nGaedheal government had to confront. Finally, the book attempts to relate the political record of the county to the existing socio-economic realities of local life. Particular emphasis is placed on the election campaigns, the issues involved, and the voting patterns and trends that emerged in Galway. In east Galway agrarian agitation shaped the nature of civil war violence. The civil war fanned a recrudescence in acute agrarian agitation in the west. In the aftermath of the civil war, the August 1923 general election was fought on the Free State government's terms.

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Úna Newell

–west economic variance, and a divided political society, the Galway experience raises important questions concerning our understanding of the achievements and disappointments of the first decade of Irish independence. The establishment of the new state brought new expectations and new frustrations when these were not met. The first part of the book discusses the turbulent years of 1922 and 1923, the local electorate’s endorsement of the Anglo-Irish Treaty and the beginning of domestic Irish politics in what was a vastly altered post-treaty world. Part II examines four major

in The west must wait
Ben Tonra

might be powerful within domestic Irish political discourses, states of the South would increasingly make demands of the international community and against the political/economic orthodoxies that would cut across the perceived self-interests of a small, but ambitious, European state. This was particularly true in the economic sphere. A new Irish prosperity within the European Community was being driven both by high agricultural prices – secured by guaranteed prices, below-cost dumping on international markets and high external tariffs – as well as by a shared

in Global citizen and European Republic