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Author: Peter Marks

This book argues the centrality of hybridity to Terry Gilliam's films. Gilliam had a collaborative approach to filmmaking and a desire to provoke audiences to their own interpretations as other forms of intertextual practice. Placing Gilliam in the category of cinematic fantasist does some preliminary critical work, but crudely homogenises the diversity of his output. One way of marking this range comes from understanding that Gilliam employs an extraordinary variety of genres. These include medieval comedy; children's historical adventure; dystopian satire; the fantastic voyage; science fiction; Gonzo Journalism; fairy tale; and gothic horror. Gilliam's work with Monty Python assured him a revered place in the history of that medium in Britain. As a result, the Python films, And Now for Something Completely Different, The Holy Grail, Life of Brian and The Meaning of Life, along with his own, Jabberwocky, Time Bandits, and Brazil, show him moving successfully into the British film industry. Most of his films have been adaptations of literary texts, and Jabberwocky forges an extended tale of monsters and market forces. The Adventures of Baron Munchausen builds on some tales from the original texts, constructing a complex examination of fantasy, representation and mortality. Taking crucial ingredients from medieval and older mythologies, the screenplay of The Fisher King resituates them and reworks them for modern America. Gilliam's complex interaction with Britain and America explains his ambiguous place in accounts of American and British films.

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Peter Marks

crudely homogenises the diversity of his output. One way of marking this range comes from understanding that Gilliam employs an extraordinary variety of genres: medieval comedy; children’s historical adventure; dystopian satire; the fantastic voyage; science fiction; Gonzo Journalism; fairy tale; and gothic horror. Each genre rejects or reworks the norms of realism, but in distinct ways, so that the

in Terry Gilliam
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Literary satire and Oskar Panizza’s Psichopatia criminalis (1898)
Birgit Lang

-Ebing’s case compilations, Panizza’s biographical case vignettes become a place within the larger work where readers can much more easily identify with the subject and narrative mode, as an analysis of the reception of Psichopatia criminalis reveals. ∙ 96 ∙ LITERARY SATIRE AND OSKAR PANIZZA’S PSICHOPATIA CRIMINALIS A dystopian satire and its reception For a satire to be successful, Simpson contends, it needs to be comprehensible, and eventually suspend its truth, retract the claim of appropriateness and rescind the underlying claim of sincerity. Psichopatia criminalis

in A history of the case study
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Tattoos, transgenics, and tech-noir in Dark angel
Will Slocombe

link between identity, branding and barcodes include texts such as Max Berry’s (corporate) dystopian satire, Jennifer government ( 2004 ), and Suzanne Weyn’s Bar code trilogy ( 2004 –12). Both authors explore how barcodes serve to undermine the ways in which individuals can assert their own identities, and express concerns about the level of state, government and/or corporate control over individuals. Barcodes are overt symbols of a mechanised, capitalist society, with the loss of individual identity that such ‘branding’ entails. Conceptually, Christopher Sebela

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives