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‘Minde on honour fixed’
Author: Jean R. Brink

This revisionary biographical study documents that Spenser was the protégé of a circle of churchmen who expected him to take holy orders, but between 1574, when he left Pembroke College, and 1579, when he published the Shepheardes Calender, he decided against a career in the church. At Pembroke College and in London, Spenser watched the Elizabethan establishment crack down on independent thinking. The sequestration of Edmund Grindal was a watershed event in his early life, as was his encounter with Philip Sidney, the dedicatee of to the Shepheardes Calender. Once Spenser exchanged the role of shepherd-priest for that of shepherd-poet, he understood that his role was not just to celebrate the victories of Protestant England over the Spanish empire, immortalize in verse the virtues of Gloriana’s knights, but also to ‘fashion a noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline’. The received biography of the early Spenser emphasizes Gabriel Harvey, who is reported to have been Spenser’s tutor. Brink shows that Harvey could not have been Spenser’s tutor and argues that Harvey published Familiar Letters (1580) to promote his ambition to be named University Orator at Cambridge. Brink shows that Spenser had already received preferment. His life is contextualized by comparisons with contemporaries including Philip Sidney, Lodowick Bryskett, Shakespeare, and Sir Walter Ralegh. Brink’s provocative study, based upon a critical re-evaluation of manuscript and printed sources, emphasizes Philip Sidney over Harvey and shows that Spenser’s appointment as secretary to Lord Grey was a preferment celebrated even years later by Camden.

Spenser, Sidney, and the early modern chivalric code
Jean R. Brink

familiar with Spenser's progress on the Faerie Queene. In addition to these marks of mutual intellectual respect, we should note that both of Spenser's two civil service offices in Ireland were initially occupied by Bryskett, suggesting that he may have recommended or supported Spenser's candidacy as his successor. 23 Court humanism versus the early modern chivalric code To

in The early Spenser, 1554–80
Abstract only
Jean R. Brink

of shepherd-poet. 9 The Shepheardes Calender records this vocational shift as well as functioning as a landmark work of English literature. 10 In Chapter 6 , ‘Minde on honour fixed’, I marshal whatever circumstantial evidence exists to suggest that Spenser knew and was influenced by the Sidneys, who introduced him to the early modern chivalric code. Under their influence, he came

in The early Spenser, 1554–80
Jean R. Brink

leaders conclude that battles will be determined by their own single combat; avowed enemies become sworn brothers because they each kept their word. 2 Shuger's formulation explains why descriptions of events in Ireland in Henry Sidney's Memoirs sometimes read like passages out of Malory's Knights of King Arthur. The early modern chivalric code, largely an honour code, bound both Irish and English military servitors, like ‘Black

in The early Spenser, 1554–80