Search results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • "early Edwardian era" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Author: Brad Beaven

This book analyses the development of male leisure against the changing notions of citizenship which underpinned perceptions of British society during the period 1850-1945. It opens with an examination of the 'leisure' problem of the middle decades of the nineteenth century. After the defeat of Chartism and associated challenges to the employers' right to organise the workplace, factory owners, the clergy and philanthropists established schemes of rational recreation designed to attract and educate working-class males. The book explores how schemes of rational recreation attempted to create the model citizen and the impact of these strategies on male working-class leisure. Taking three influential leisure activities - drink, the music hall and association football - the book explores their impact on both concepts of citizenship and male leisure patterns. In addition, commercial leisure also highlighted the marked gender divides in leisure activities found within working-class households. The book investigates the generational issues that shaped male working-class leisure. The increase in non-apprenticed semi-skilled work, particularly in the 'new' industry regions, raised fears that monotonous working practices and new leisure activities were a dangerous social cocktail. Moreover the book investigates how, during the late Victorian and early Edwardian era, the problem of a 'degenerate' youth became entwined with anxieties over the future of empire. It further contextualises male leisure against the dominant concerns between 1918 and 1945. This era saw the suburbanisation of British cities, continued anxieties over male citizenry and increased international tensions that led to war.

Abstract only
Brad Beaven

social cocktail. Moreover we shall investigate how, during the late Victorian and early Edwardian era, the problem of a ‘degenerate’ youth became entwined with anxieties over the future of empire. Chapters 4–7 contextualise male leisure against the dominant concerns between 1918 and 1945. This era saw the suburbanisation of British cities, continued anxieties over male citizenry and increased international tensions that led to war. Chapter 4 will analyse specifically how working-class male leisure activities often shifted from the hearts of cities to the selfcontained

in Leisure, citizenship and working-class men in Britain, 1850–1945
Constance Backhouse, Ann Curthoys, Ian Duncanson, and Ann Parsonson

differentiation and exclusion as a nationally focused working class comes into existence, and women, too, argue for inclusion in the political order. Susan Thorne observes that the already vague category of ‘race’ and that of class were not seen as antithetical categories by the nineteenth century. 48 As late as the early Edwardian era, Susan Kingsley Kent finds Sir Almroth Wright

in Law, history, colonialism