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Practice and policy lessons from Northern Ireland and the Border Counties

Transforming Conflict examines lessons learned from the Northern Ireland and Border Counties conflict transformation process through social and economic development and their consequent impacts and implications for practice and policymaking, with a range of functional recommendations produced for other regions emerging from and seeking to transform violent conflict. It provides, for the first time, a comprehensive assessment of the region’s transformation activity, largely amongst grassroots actors, enabled by a number of specific funding programmes, namely the International Fund for Ireland, Peace I and II and INTERREG I, II and IIIA. These programmes have facilitated conflict transformation over more than two decades, presenting a case ripe for lesson sharing. In focusing on the politics of the socioeconomic activities that underpinned the elite negotiations of the peace process, key theoretical transformation concepts are firstly explored, followed by an examination of the social and economic context of Northern Ireland and the Border Counties. The three programmes and their impacts are then assessed before considering what policy lessons can be learned and what recommendations can be made for practice. This is underpinned by a range of semi-structured interviews and the author’s own experience as a project promoter through these programmes in the Border Counties for more than a decade.

From import-substitution industrialization to economic liberalization

4 Economic development: from importsubstitution industrialization to economic liberalization When India became independent in 1947 Indian leaders were aware that India was a developing country even though the concept of development was not given sufficient international recognition before the launch of the UN Development Decades in 1961. This chapter will comment on the diversity of approaches to development, although its main focus will be the Indian government’s policies. However, one cannot understand these policies without some knowledge of their antecedents

in India in a globalized world

Having discussed the difficulties associated with the role of social and economic development in transforming conflict, assessing the conflict driver role of social and economic development and the effects of conflict on such development presents its own difficulties. Despite the domination of an elite-level political discourse, there is no

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
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INTERREG I, II and III programmes, since 1991. All have facilitated the conflict transformation process in the region specifically through social and economic development. 1 Collectively, having contributed over €3.25 billion to the process, they have been responsible for a huge increase in transformation practice, particularly at the grassroots level, prompting previously unforeseen levels of citizen empowerment and

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development

In view of the theoretical confusion and associated definitional morass surrounding conflict transformation, it is necessary to preface this book with some conceptual clarification. This will enable an appropriate assessment of conflict transformation through social and economic development, specifically through the impacts of the tools under consideration

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
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This book has highlighted the vastness and complexity of the conflict transformation field. While the Northern Ireland conflict is one of the most heavily researched conflicts in the world, research focusing on its conflict transformation process, particularly through social and economic development, is not readily available. Specifically, no attempt has

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
The case of colonial India and Africa

Bayly 02_Tonra 01 21/06/2011 10:17 Page 39 2 Indigenous and colonial origins of comparative economic development: the case of colonial India and Africa C.A. Bayly 1 In recent years the debate about comparative economic development has broadened out to take account of work in other major human sciences, particularly anthropology, sociology, philosophy and history. Development specialists have become increasingly aware of the need to understand the history and ideologies of the societies within which they work in order to encourage better reactions to their

in History, historians and development policy

the instability of recent years, and shall consider the possibility of securing international support for this work’. 2 Through a supplemental treaty signed by the two governments on 18 September 1986, the IFI was established and came into existence on 12 December 1986. This was one of the first formal recognitions of the role that social and economic development was to play

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development

, particularly that of the Peace programmes, illustrates how ‘there is still a lack of systematic thinking about how social and economic policy can be used to promote peace and a perceptible weakness in theoretical knowledge about the precise links between economic development, social inclusion and reconciliation’. 2 This is despite practitioners believing that social and economic development has a

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development

was established. I believe that the Fund is one of those factors and that it can share in the credit for what has been achieved … The Fund has … promoted economic development and social advance in disadvantaged areas and contributed to making progress in cross-community reconciliation. The results of this work can be seen in almost every city, town and village in

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development