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The well-being of Europe’s citizens depends less on individual consumption and more on their social consumption of essential goods and services – from water and retail banking to schools and care homes – in what we call the foundational economy. Individual consumption depends on market income, while foundational consumption depends on social infrastructure and delivery systems of networks and branches, which are neither created nor renewed automatically, even as incomes increase. This historically created foundational economy has been wrecked in the last generation by privatisation, outsourcing, franchising and the widespread penetration of opportunistic and predatory business models. The distinctive, primary role of public policy should therefore be to secure the supply of basic services for all citizens (not a quantum of economic growth and jobs). Reconstructing the foundational has to start with a vision of citizenship that identifies foundational entitlements as the conditions for dignified human development, and likewise has to depend on treating the business enterprises central to the foundational economy as juridical persons with claims to entitlements but also with responsibilities and duties. If the aim is citizen well-being and flourishing for the many not the few, then European politics at regional, national and EU level needs to be refocused on foundational consumption and securing universal minimum access and quality. If/when government is unresponsive, the impetus for change has to come from engaging citizens locally and regionally in actions which break with the top down politics of ‘vote for us and we will do this for you’.

The Future of Work among the Forcibly Displaced
Evan Easton-Calabria
and
Andreas Hackl

focuses on the nexus of displacement with another emerging global phenomenon: the changing nature of work. Digitalisation and the digital economy are at the forefront of these transformations. This includes online gig work and how innovations in technology, artificial intelligence (AI), and robotics are driving forward rapid changes in most fields of work. Economies are increasingly becoming digital and web-based, reshaping labour markets and employment

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The infrastructure of everyday life

The well-being of Europe’s citizens depends less on individual consumption and more on their social consumption of essential goods and services – from water and retail banking to schools and care homes – in what we call the foundational economy. Individual consumption depends on market income, while foundational consumption depends on social infrastructure and delivery systems of networks and branches, which are neither created nor renewed automatically, even as incomes increase. This historically created foundational economy has been wrecked in the last generation by privatisation, outsourcing, franchising and the widespread penetration of opportunistic and predatory business models. The distinctive, primary role of public policy should therefore be to secure the supply of basic services for all citizens (not a quantum of economic growth and jobs). Reconstructing the foundational has to start with a vision of citizenship that identifies foundational entitlements as the conditions for dignified human development, and likewise has to depend on treating the business enterprises central to the foundational economy as juridical persons with claims to entitlements but also with responsibilities and duties. If the aim is citizen well-being and flourishing for the many not the few, then European politics at regional, national and EU level needs to be refocused on foundational consumption and securing universal minimum access and quality. If/when government is unresponsive, the impetus for change has to come from engaging citizens locally and regionally in actions which break with the top down politics of ‘vote for us and we will do this for you’.

Claire Parfitt

element of how the speculative moral economy works and the function it is designed to perform. That is, ESG integration enables investors to identify, assess and manage financial risks to their own portfolios, facilitating speculation about which of these risks is most important to minimise or hedge and which ESG opportunities should be pursued. This is an important aspect of the speculative moral economy represented by ESG investing and stakeholder capitalism. This moral economy is not grounded in a specific set of principles. Rather, it is based on the capacity of

in False profits of ethical capital
Abstract only
Edwin Bacon
,
Bettina Renz
, and
Julian Cooper

Bacon 07 3/2/06 10:31 AM Page 151 7 The economy In considering the economy from the point of view of securitisation the underlying dilemma which is present throughout this book shifts a little. In most chapters, because of the issues with which we are dealing, the background theme is the trade-off between democracy and authoritarianism. Although because of the focus of our analysis we have not often put it in quite these terms, what we are assessing on one level is the balance between practices associated with the Soviet Union, and those associated with a

in Securitising Russia
Paul Bookbinder

10 The German economy and the Weimar Republic Economic factors played a role in the failure of the Weimar Republic as they did in the ultimate success of the Nazis. They were not, however, the only factors nor necessarily the decisive ones. The actions of political leaders, industrialists, land owners and union leaders contributed equally to the intensity of conflict that characterized the period. Their failure to deal effectively with economic developments exacerbated the problems and was often more significant than the realities of the crises themselves. It

in Weimar Germany
Abstract only
Michael Harrigan

Slave economies 2  Slave economies Early French accounts of the Antilles reflect the transformations in settlement patterns from initiatives with a strong military and commercial character, to more established patterns of plantation colonisation. A number of testimonies have also been left by participants in the transportation of slaves across the Atlantic to the Americas. These texts reflect significant displacements and societal changes. They illustrate how human beings were introduced into new circuits of exchange, and how African slaves were commoditised

in Frontiers of servitude
Claire Parfitt

analysis in this chapter adopts two primary frames as heuristic devices to orient the discussion. The first is the notion of a moral economy. The concept is used here in a broader sense than the Thompsonian pre-industrial peasant moral economy. The classic example in Thompson's work is the ‘crowds’ of working people who forcibly took control of grain supplies at certain moments during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in England. These crowds distributed grain at what they considered to be a just price to prevent profiteering and to ensure that people who needed

in False profits of ethical capital
Chantier de l’Économie Sociale Trust, Montreal
Jean-Marc Fontan
and
Denis Bussières

23 Social financing, social economy: Chantier de l’Économie Sociale Trust, Montreal Jean-Marc Fontan and Denis Bussières Context For several years, managers of social economy enterprises have been expressing the need to have access to financial products other than traditional grants and loans, while at the same time asking how best to maintain their business capital over the long term. They deemed that new products which kept their social mission in mind would be needed. At the request of the Chantier de l’Économie Sociale Trust, a study on these issues was

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Anna Killick

In a city on the south coast of England one evening, just after the 2016 referendum on the European Union, Diane talks about the economy at the offices where she works as a cleaner. She is on the top floor in a corridor overlooking the housing estate where she grew up and where her mother still lives. She is in her early thirties, married with four children. She is composed and, at times, reticent. She describes how just before the 2008 financial crisis her husband was earning high wages as a painter and decorator so they decided to buy a house. A few months

in Rigged