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Religion and power in the Frankish Kingdoms: studies in honour of Mayke de Jong

This book, written in honour of Mayke De Jong, offers twenty-five essays focused upon the importance of religion to Frankish politics. It deals with religious discourse and political polemic in studies that take up the themes of identity, and the creative deployment of the language of the Old Testament within Frankish society. The book explores how the use of ethnic rhetoric in a Christian context shaped medieval perceptions of community. It shows that the Carolingian way of dealing with the Adoptionist challenge was to allow a conversation between the Spanish bishops and their Frankish opponents to take place. Charlemagne's role in the Vita Alcuini as a guardian of orthodoxy who sought to settle a controversy by organising and supervising a theological debate was striking. The book also discusses the admonition of an abbot of Frankish origin who came from southern France and made his monastic career in southern Italy. It showcases three letter manuscripts that share certain features but are different in other aspects. The first manuscript is a collection of the Moral Letters from Seneca to his pupil Lucilius , Paris , BnF, lat. 8658A. The book demonstrates that the lists of amici, viventes et defuncti reflected how the royal monastery was interacting with ruling elites, at different levels, and how such interactions were an essential part of its identity. It also examines the context of Monte Cassino's fading into the background, in the conviction that both political and religious concerns were at play.

1 Peter 2.9 and the Franks

letter, which was probably written in the early second century, was soon ascribed to Peter the Apostle, which lent extra weight to it. Later, this and similar pieces of rhetoric could be used in arguments about the role of particular communities within the universal Church in specific historical contexts. This leads to a second line of enquiry, pursued in the present chapter and so far hardly addressed: How did the often emphatic use of ethnic rhetoric in a Christian context shape medieval perceptions of D. Buell, Why This New Race? Ethnic Reasoning in Early

in Religious Franks
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polemic in studies that take up the themes of identity, the creative deployment of the language of the Old Testament within Frankish society, law and the definition of royal authority. They address different instances of the uses of the Introduction 7 resources of the past for contemporary debates. Thus Gerda Heydemann and Walter Pohl explore early medieval uses of the biblical metaphor of a ‘chosen people’ in the early Middle Ages and show how the use of ethnic rhetoric in a Christian context shaped medieval perceptions of community. Rutger Kramer considers the

in Religious Franks

. In this context it is not a coincidence that the Balkan wars of the 1990s in the former Yugoslavia were fought out directly between ethnic groups, whereas the previous civil conflict, in the wake of the Second World War, had been fought out between proletarian and middle-class partisans. It follows that, in order to mediate between these ethnic tensions, one needs a multi-ethnic rhetoric, and no

in Mapping European security after Kosovo