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An oral history
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This book provides a unique perspective on the Allied bombing of France during the Second World War which killed around 57,000 French civilians. Using oral history as well as archival research, it provides an insight into children's wartime lives in which bombing often featured prominently, even though it has slipped out of French collective memory. The book compares three French towns with different experiences of bombing: Boulogne-Billancourt , Brest, and Lille. Divided into three parts dealing with expectations, experiences and explanations of bombing, the book considers the child's view of wartime violence, analysing resilience, understanding and trauma. The first part of the book deals with the time before bombing. It examines how the French prepared for war and preparations made specifically for bombing, showing how state-level and municipal-level preparations. The second part considers the time during bombing and its aftermath. It discusses the experience of being bombed, examining children's practical, sensory and emotional responses. The fascinating and frightening scenes in the immediate aftermath of bombing that made lasting impressions on children, including destruction, chaos and encounters with violent, public death. Changes in status as a result of bombing becoming a sinistre, refugee or evacuee had far-reaching consequences in some children's lives, affecting their education and economic situation. The last section looks at the way in which air raids were explained to the French population. It considers the propaganda that criticised and defended the Allies, and an understanding of the history of Vichy.

Abstract only
Sue Vice

Anglo-Jewish plays 8 The Evacuees (1975) and Bar Mitzvah Boy (1976) In the Timeshift documentary Jack Rosenthal, broadcast on BBC1, 30 September 2004, four months after Rosenthal’s death, Jonathan Lynn argued that Rosenthal’s personal identifications were threefold: northern, working-class and Jewish. In this chapter I will explore the third of these elements. There are Jewish incidents and characters in many of Rosenthal’s television plays. These sometimes exist at the level of small details – a removal man bringing Miss Shepherd her long-awaited desk in Well

in Jack Rosenthal
Sue Wheatcroft

invasion. Consequently, the government arranged for the able-­bodied evacuees to be re-­evacuated and, soon after, the local children were also evacuated.1 For the children being accommodated in residential special schools, it was not so straightforward. Although some had returned home during the ‘phoney war’ between September 1939 and May 1940, there were still around 1,500 disabled children being accommodated in residential special schools, in holiday camps, on the line of coast stretching from the Wash to Newhaven.2 Owing to the lack of alternative accommodation, the

in Worth saving
Refugees in the Austrian part of the Habsburg Empire during the First World War
Martina Hermann

from border regions. In a programme devised by the Ministry of War and implemented by the army in Cisleithanian border regions, Ruthenians, Poles and Jews in Galicia and Bukovina, as well as the Serb-Croatian population of Bosnia and (after 1915) the Italianspeaking population of South Tyrol and Trentino, were evacuated and deported into other parts of the monarchy.1 This chapter introduces refugee/evacuee politics in Austria-Hungary, in particular Cisleithania, and then explores the approach of the Habsburg administration towards refugees. (For the sake of

in Europe on the move
Lindsey Dodd

elderly people was ordered from Brest in February 1943. It was becoming too difficult to protect civilians from increasingly heavy raids. Yvette Chapalain was thirteen. She was sent with her younger siblings in tow to board in central Finistère. Her narrative lingered on the emotional deprivation that this separation from home had entailed, and on her residual anger. Becoming an evacuee was just one consequence of bombing in children’s lives. Air raids created acute local crises and sparked large-scale population movement, pre-emptive and responsive, voluntary and

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Sue Vice

Versions of autobiography 7 P’tang, Yang, Kipperbang (1982), Bye, Bye, Baby (1992), Eskimo Day (1996) and Cold Enough for Snow (1997) Many of Jack Rosenthal’s television plays contain autobiographical elements, particularly the early films The Evacuees (1975) and P’tang, Yang, Kipperbang (1982). Bye, Bye Baby (1992) was described on its release as the third in an informal trilogy consisting of these plays, and was followed ten years later by two further autobiographically based films, Eskimo Day (1996) and its sequel, Cold Enough for Snow (1997). Rosenthal

in Jack Rosenthal
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Author:

This is a critical work on Jack Rosenthal, the highly regarded British television dramatist. His career began with Coronation Street in the 1960s and he became famous for his popular sitcoms, including The Lovers and The Dustbinmen. During what is often known as the ‘golden age’ of British television drama, Rosenthal wrote such plays as The Knowledge, The Chain, Spend, Spend, Spend and P'tang, Yang, Kipperbang, as well as the pilot for the series London's Burning. This study offers a close analysis of all his best-known works, drawing on archival material as well as interviews with his collaborators, including Jonathan Lynn and Don Black. The book places Rosenthal's plays in their historical and televisual context, and does so by tracing the events that informed his writing – ranging from his comic take on the ‘permissive society’ of the 1960s, to recession in the 1970s and Thatcherism in the 1980s. His distinctive brand of melancholy humour is contrasted throughout with the work of contemporaries such as Dennis Potter, Alan Bleasdale and Johnny Speight, and his influence on contemporary television and film is analysed. Rosenthal is not usually placed in the canon of Anglo-Jewish writing, but the book argues this case by focusing on his prize-winning Plays for Today, The Evacuees and Bar Mitzvah Boy.

Planning for post-war migration
Jean P. Smith

rather than class identity upon arrival in the Dominions and often lived with wealthy, professional families who opened their homes in a show of British patriotism. 18 Shakespeare envisioned CORB and the post-war migration he hoped it would spur as the beginning of a reinvigorated chapter in imperial history. In a 1941 speech to the Victoria League, Shakespeare declared that the Dominions’ offer to take in child evacuees reflected the ‘inherent unity of the Empire’. 19 For Shakespeare, imperial unity was firmly based on the

in Settlers at the end of empire
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Sue Wheatcroft

extremely limited. Similarly, although there are copious amounts of scholarly literature on able-­bodied evacuees, very little has been published on the subject of disabled children during this time, and their personal experiences have not been examined in any great detail.3 This means that a significant part, not only of children’s experiences of the Second World War but also of the history of disability, is missing. The primary aim of this book then, is to bring attention to this group of children and to highlight their experiences during the war, thereby correcting

in Worth saving
Abstract only
Sam Rohdie

évacuées au profit d’une interrogation sur l’image, sur les ‘rapports de production’ de l’image. L’image godardienne n’est plus (si elle fut jamais) transparente aux choses, elle s’opacifie et se simplifie dangereusement pour ne plus signifier qu’elle-même. (The Nouvelle Vague defined itself first of all by the realism of its themes and language … But very soon, and thanks to Godard, this claim of a cinema that more directly seized upon life (and was 194 Film modernism t­herefore more realistic) was transformed into a claim for the freedom of writing (écriture) … It

in Film modernism