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David Owen

Bauböck is ascribing to expatriate voting rights. The second concerns the non-identity of citizenship and authorial membership of the demos. I'll address these in turn. In earlier work explicitly addressing the external franchise, Bauböck ( 2007 ) argues that expatriate voting is neither required nor forbidden by justice. Consider two sets of remarks. In the first, Bauböck reiterates the stakeholder principle

in Democratic inclusion
Open Access (free)
Rainer Bauböck

set of circumstances under which expatriates would have a justice-based claim to inclusion in a constitutional demos. It is not entirely clear to me for what kind of decisions a constitutional demos would have to be specified. Owen identifies a narrow class of constitutional decisions that “directly [concern] [non-residents’] very status as citizens” and that “specify the entitlements and obligations of citizens – such as, for example, laws

in Democratic inclusion
David Miller

Borders .” Political Theory 36 : 37–65 . Arrhenius , Gustaf . 2005 . “ The Boundary Problem in Democratic Theory .” In (ed.), Democracy Unbound , edited by Folke Tersman . Stockholm : Stockholm University : 14–29 . Bauböck , Rainer 2015 . “ Morphing the Demos into the Right Shape: Normative Principles for Enfranchising Resident Aliens and Expatriate

in Democratic inclusion
Open Access (free)
Philip Nanton

.p.), describes a first experience of the then undeveloped Palm Island in the following way: ‘It was heaven at first … To be alone on the island with no development … We lived a Robinson Crusoe life there. We had nothing, but we had ourselves, and the nicest thing in the world is to own nothing’ (Vaughn, 1994 : 5). Saladino, the main expatriate entrepreneur in Canouan, recounted to me his Canouan

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Catherine Baker

distinctions between ‘historic’ peoples (Germans, Magyars, Italians) and peoples without history (Slavs, Romanians) (Glajar 2001 : 19) juxtaposed the same temporalities with which Europeans divided places and peoples into civilised and backward zones (Mignolo 2000 ). Viewing European colonial dominance beyond just the direct colonisation of territory overseas meanwhile reveals multiple dimensions of Austro-Hungarian implication in global coloniality: from the travels of expatriate missionaries, doctors, agents and freelance ‘explorers’ ( Chapter 2 ), to short-lived Indian

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
A pluralist theory of citizenship
Rainer Bauböck

expatriates, 13 which could eventually undermine the salience and stability of territorial political boundaries. A second reason is that democracy also needs a sense of “ownership” and belonging to the polity. It is difficult to imagine how hypermobile populations could be citizens of the territorial polity who authorize the government that issues and implements the laws to which they are subjected. If there is a relatively sedentary core population

in Democratic inclusion