Representations and perceptions of fraudulent identities
Author: Tobias B. Hug

Impostors and impostures featured prominently in the political, social and religious life of early modern England. Who was likely to be perceived as impostor, and why? This book offers a full-scale analysis of this multifaceted phenomenon. Using approaches drawn from historical anthropology and micro-history, it investigates changes and continuities within the impostor phenomenon from 1500 to the late eighteenth century, exploring the variety of representations and perceptions of impostors, and their deeper meanings within the specific contexts of social, political, religious, institutional and cultural change. The book examines a wide range of sources, from judicial archives and other official records to chronicles, newspapers, ballads, pamphlets and autobiographical writings. Given that identity is never fixed, but involves a performative dimension, changing over time and space, it looks at the specific factors which constitute identity in a particular context, and asks why certain characteristics of an allegedly false identity were regarded as fake.

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The performance of Basqueness by Carmelo Gómez and Silvia Munt
Rob Stone

) and Baztán (Iñaki Elizalde, 2012) and those of Munt in Akelarre/​ Witches’ Sabbath (Pedro Olea, 1984), Golfo de Vizcaya/​Bay of Biscay (Javier Rebollo, 1985), Alas de mariposa/​Butterfly Wings (Juanma Bajo Ulloa, 1991), Todo está oscuro/​Everything is Dark (Ana Díez, 1997) and El viaje de Arián/​Arián’s Journey (Eduard Bosch, 2000) respectively. By means of close readings of these performances and contextual and comparative analyses, this chapter exposes the screen personas of Gómez and Munt as false identities that complicate the articulation of desirable and

in Performance and Spanish film
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Sam Rohdie

multiplicity and differential origins that it is a puzzle, not so much false, as incomprehensible, closest perhaps, to another parallel time zone narration, Orson Welles’s Mr Arkadin (1955). Welles, like Nolan, found his inspiration in Shakespeare, and, specifically, as Nolan did, in Macbeth and Julius Caesar, though there are also other Shakespeare citations in the Welles: Othello and Chimes at Midnight and the ubiquity of Wellesian (and Shakespearian) masquerade, trickery and false identities. Kilpatrick is in fact murdered, but at the hands of his friends not his enemies

in Film modernism
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Sam Rohdie

Athos Magnani, the father, and that out of loyalty to a myth of his father and to the reality of his father (who is a myth-maker), he is constrained to accept. And there Drama 65 is a further echo of that situation in the duplicity and false identity at play in Welles’s Arkadin (1955), where Arkadin (a fiction) must be sustained in order that his other and secret identity, Athabadze, is not revealed. And when it is revealed that Arkadin and Athabadze are the same person, Arkadin/Athabadze has no other choice but that of suicide to protect the name of who he is not

in Film modernism
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Sam Rohdie

Prima della rivoluzione, indeed in all Bertolucci’s films, is subject to doubling (and it is), and to false identities and theatrical masquerades (and it is), there is no one thing that is final, but there are instead multiple comparatives between multiple likenesses, relations that are essentially formal rather than substantive, forms of contradiction and repetition. Fabrizio can never decide, or, when he seems to decide and marries Clelia, it is as if he is not there, his presence an absence that never was present, an inability to act, action that is divorced from

in Film modernism
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Sam Rohdie

about his documents just as the policeman questions him when he is with Marianne and earlier still at the border crossing (where Nadine, on the telephone confirms to the police inspector, Carlos’s false identity as her father, René Sallanches). Diego follows Marianne at a distance into the station and watches her deposit the suitcase. He is in the same position as the policeman who had followed Nadine and

in Montage
Lucy Michael

silence in much of the coverage of the asylum issue. The framing of asylum as a security issue is evident in its coverage within the broadsheet newspapers. In 2008, the Irish Independent 's Security Editor claimed ‘Bogus asylum seekers escaping deportation’, using the term ‘illegals’ and ‘asylum shoppers’, implying that ‘last-minute judicial reviews’ to prevent deportation were used to support fraudulent asylum claims. 38 In 2012, the same author claimed ‘Two-thirds of failed asylum seekers had used false identities’, proposing that Somalis

in Immigrants as outsiders in the two Irelands
The Albanian mafia
Xavier Raufer

whose operations are accompanied by a wealth of security and protection. Consummate protection Even more internalised than at the disappearance of the communist regime, twothirds of the agents of the very paranoid Albanian GPU (the Sigurimi or Secret Police) were sacked; a number of them soon joined the local criminal clans. These individuals all go under the cover of pseudonyms, nicknames and false identities. Worse still, according to their local origins, Albanian hill-dwellers speak dialects crossed with slang which – even in the nearby valleys – their neighbours

in Potentials of disorder
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Tobias B. Hug

vital observation for it forces us to look for the specific factors which constitute identity in a particular context, and find out the reasons why certain factors of an allegedly false identity were regarded as fake. However, Goffman’s metaphor of the stage – which Shakespeare had already used in As You Like It – also implied that all was artifice, which creates problems of interpretation and does not help to explain imposture. Is it possible to define the boundary between acting and ‘being’? Can we determine the motivation or consciousness behind someone

in Impostures in early modern England
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Approaching performance in Spanish film
Dean Allbritton, Alejandro Melero and Tom Whittaker

disability at arm’s length, constantly eluding audiences and actors alike. In Chapter  14, ‘Body doubles:  the performance of Basqueness by Carmelo Gómez and Silvia Munt’, Rob Stone examines the reconstruction of regional and national identities through acting. In this chapter, Stone dissects the performances of Gómez and Munt, two actors made famous for their multiple and iconic Basque roles. By closely examining their performances, Stone argues that the actors’ false identities articulate a Basqueness that is at once desirable and desiring, seeded with unattainability

in Performance and Spanish film