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Caroline Rusterholz

This chapter delves into the many ways in which British women doctors pressed for the development of an international movement for birth control and family planning, from the first attempt in 1928 to create an international organisation to the establishment of the International Planned Parenthood Federation in 1952. 1 In addition, this chapter pushes the transnational approach even further by showing how the circulation of actors and knowledge from Britain to France eased the creation of a

in Women’s medicine
Open Access (free)
Sex, family planning and British female doctors in transnational perspective, 1920–70

Women’s medicine explores the key role played by British female doctors in the production and circulation of contraceptive knowledge and the handling of sexual disorders between the 1920s and 1970s at the transnational level, taking France as a point of comparison. This study follows the path of a set of women doctors as they made their way through the predominantly male-dominated medical landscape in establishing birth control and family planning as legitimate fields of medicine. This journey encompasses their practical engagement with birth control and later family planning clinics in Britain, their participation in the development of the international movement of birth control and family planning and their influence on French doctors. Drawing on a wide range of archived and published medical materials, this study sheds light on the strategies British female doctors used, and the alliances they made, to put forward their medical agenda and position themselves as experts and leaders in birth control and family planning research and practice.

Expanding Gender Norms to Marriage Drivers Facing Boys and Men in South Sudan
Michelle Lokot
,
Lisa DiPangrazio
,
Dorcas Acen
,
Veronica Gatpan
, and
Ronald Apunyo

of familiesplan for economic stability, though ‘at the centre of the quagmire is the conceptualization of the daughter as an economic commodity’ ( Huser, 2018 : 26). Cattle may be part of the bride price in some communities, which men often – though not exclusively – obtain through raiding ( Glowacki and Wrangham, 2015 ). Rising bride price has been linked to increases in cattle raiding ( Hudson and Matfess, 2017 ). Our literature review yielded limited publicly available reports and evaluations on the impact of current or past efforts to address child marriage

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Preventing pregnancy
Leanne McCormick

, the authorities were intent on avoiding controversy at all costs. However, in the case of family planning it is arguable that while the actual opposition from the Churches was relatively muted, it was the fear of potential opposition that hindered the development of a family planning service. This chapter considers the establishment of the first family planning clinic in Belfast in 1936 and the growth of a family planning service in the 1950s and 1960s. It is of no surprise that services in Northern Ireland grew at a slower rate than the rest of the UK. The first

in Regulating sexuality
Open Access (free)
Caroline Rusterholz

-dominated medical landscape. They sought to establish the use of birth control – that is, any practices, methods, and devices that could prevent pregnancy – as a legitimate field of medicine. Alongside their work to medicalise and legitimise birth control, they promoted family planning, or the provision of contraceptive methods to plan and space births, and offered counselling on sexual disorders, fertility and sub-fertility. These areas of practice, which would become a new career path for many women doctors, emerged from women doctors’ experiences and encounters with patients

in Women’s medicine
Open Access (free)
A transnational journey of expertise
Caroline Rusterholz

all, Jackson emphasised that ‘the woman's fertility was not disturbed by this method’ and that no ‘pelvic inflammatory conditions had developed’. 85 At the conference, Jackson also learnt of the existence of the two new plastic devices and was impressed by their seemingly good results. When she returned to Britain, she started fitting her patients with these new plastic devices. In 1963, she published a paper in Family Planning that reviewed her experience with the Gräfenberg

in Women’s medicine
Abstract only
Leanne McCormick

family planning. The role of the Catholic and Protestant Churches in the regulation of female sexuality is considered, and it is argued that there was considerable unity across the religious and political spectrum in relation to female sexuality. Historical background The turmoil in Northern Ireland and the unique political, social and religious circumstances of the period provide the backdrop to this discussion of the regulation of female sexuality. The issue of Home Rule dominated the political landscape in Ireland in the first decades of the twentieth century

in Regulating sexuality
Open Access (free)
Caroline Rusterholz

I am writing about an important uncertainty affecting many women doctors working in family planning. As you will no doubt be aware many of us have acquired over the years considerable expertise in this field and there seems to be a strong possibility in light of the government proposals that this work will largely be taken over by General Practitioners of very varied training in family planning and of course mostly male. It is also true that some hospitals are opening

in Women’s medicine
Caroline Rusterholz

[W]omen clients came to us because we were all women. Women doctors, women nurses, women running clinics. 1 Helena Wright From the opening of birth control clinics in the early 1920s to the Family Planning Act in 1967, women have been central actors in the campaign for birth control and contraception in Britain

in Women’s medicine
Expanding the work of the clinics
Caroline Rusterholz

Oh this isn't so boring if you get your climax. Joan Malleson, 1950s 1 During the interwar period and onwards, family planning centres expanded their birth control sessions into sexual advice, which became available primarily through the activities of women doctors in Britain. They set up advisory sessions on ‘sub-fertility’, which

in Women’s medicine