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Place, society and culture in a post-boom era

Ireland is a turbulent place. This book engages readers with the contours of transformation of Irish society through a series of distinct episodes and sites where change can be confronted. The content of the book intersects with the boom and bust themes to explore the economic and social implications of the recession. The processes are as diverse as cross-border development, farming knowledges, food movements, and the evolution of traditional Irish music. The modernisation of Irish society during the Celtic Tiger and its subsequent demise was a 'spatial drama' involving transformation in the material landscape and the imaginative representation of the island. The first part of the book explores the revolving intersections of identity politics with place. It tracks the discovery of the ghost estate and the ways in which it has been implicated in debates about the Irish economic crash, complicating ideas of home and community. After a discussion on immigration, the book discusses the role of migrants in filling labour and skill shortages. The second part pays attention to questions of mobility and consumption in urban and rural contexts. The new Irish motorway network, free time, leisure and holidaying in the lives of lone parents during the Celtic Tiger, and the role of National Asset Management Agency (NAMA) are discussed. The third part explores diverse cultural practices and some longstanding representations of Ireland. An autobiographical tour of the pub session, National Geographic's representations of Irish landscape and the current Irish imagination are the key concepts of this part.

Irish farming knowledges
Caroline Crowley

10 Ancestors in the field: Irish farming knowledges Caroline Crowley Seek wisdom, not knowledge, knowledge is of the past, wisdom is of the future. Native American proverb from the Lumbee tribe. Ireland’s economic realities have undergone a spectacular transition from an apparently booming economy through the early 2000s, to an economy in recession by the end of the decade. While debates rage as to who and what is responsible, there is general agreement that the economic crisis presents an opportunity to re-imagine the future and that any recovery will be

in Spacing Ireland
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Geographies of the post-boom era
Denis Linehan and Caroline Crowley

varying extents with the boom and bust themes to explore the economic and social implications of the recession in terms of processes as diverse as cross-border development, farming knowledges, food movements, and the evolution of traditional Irish music. Observations on the overarching theme of ‘change’ run through the case studies and topics addressed in this collection, which are also attentive to the relationships between space, place, landscape, identity and society. In both historical phases – boom and bust – the modernisation of Irish society during the Celtic

in Spacing Ireland
Kent Fedorowich

, candidates had to satisfy government selection officers that they possessed sufficient expertise and practical farming knowledge to succeed in their new vocation. In order to ensure success and foster greater responsibility and independence among the soldier settlers, Scott proposed that each settler be required to invest $200 of his own capital. Scott pondered that should the flotation of a loan by the

in Unfit for heroes