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Jennifer Lloyd

3 The heyday of female itinerancy M ary O’Bryan Thorne’s tombstone is next to her husband Samuel’s, flush with the wall of what was once the Bible Christian chapel at Lake Farm, Shebbear, Devon, her home for twenty years of her life. It memorializes her as ‘wife of Samuel Thorne, printer, daughter of William O’Bryan, founder of the Bible Christians, among whom she was a minister sixty years.’ Mary O’Bryan was born on Gunwen Farm, Cornwall, in 1807, eldest daughter of Catherine and William O’Bryan. Catherine, herself an educated and independent woman, was

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Jennifer Lloyd

7 Deaconesses, Sisters of the People, and the revival of female itinerancy E mma Davis, the woman who became widely known in the central London district of Blackfriars as ‘Sister Annie,’ was born in Aldersgate in 1859, the eldest child of a poor family. Her mother died when she was eight, and the family moved to the dock area of Rotherhithe, where she attended a Primitive Methodist Sunday school. At age thirteen she abandoned formal schooling to work as a domestic servant, but left when her employer would not let her go to Sunday school. She took a job as a

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Persistent preachers, 1807–1907
Author: Jennifer Lloyd

A response to the prominent Methodist historian David Hempton's call to analyse women's experience within Methodism, this book deals with British Methodist women preachers over the entire nineteenth century, with special emphasis on the Primitive Methodists and Bible Christians. The book covers women preachers in Wesley's lifetime, the reason why some Methodist sects allowed women to preach and others did not, and the experience of Bible Christian and Primitive Methodist female evangelists before 1850. It also describes the many other ways in which women supported their chapel communities. The second half of the book includes the careers of mid-century women revivalists, the opportunities, home and foreign missions offered for female evangelism, the emergence of deaconess evangelists and Sisters of the People in late century, and the brief revival of female itinerancy among the Bible Christians.

Abstract only
Jennifer Lloyd

the social and economic changes of the first half of the nineteenth century, and that religious worship in domestic spaces emboldened some women to embark on careers as itinerant (travelling) preachers. My examination of the lives and working conditions of female itinerants in the 1820s and 1830s supports Valenze’s claim that the decline of women’s itinerancy by mid-century is partially explained by the effects of industrialization,   6   LLoyd_01_Intro.indd 6 17/09/2009 10:04 introduction urbanization, and migration. But I also attribute it to internal change

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Jennifer Lloyd

in public were associated with disorder, and female prophets could be accused of witchcraft and sexual lust. The reaction against religious fanaticism and its identification with subversion and rebellion reflected in the provisions of the Clarendon Code meant a retreat from female public testimony. Of the 120 women active between 1650 and 1665, more than half ended their lives as Quakers, the one sect where women’s public ministry was recognized, some female itinerants chose to speak to non-Quakers, usually in the open air, and women could serve as elders as well

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Abstract only
Women’s activism in the Secularist movement
Laura Schwartz

Bible Christians and Primitive Methodists kept the tradition of female itinerancy alive until the early 1850s; see J. M. Lloyd, Women and the Shaping of British Methodism: Persistent Preachers, 1807–1907 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2009 ). For women in other denominations, see S. Mumm, ‘“I Love My Sex”: Two Late Victorian Pulpit Women, in J. Bellamy, A. Laurenca & Gill Perry (eds

in Infidel feminism
Jennifer Lloyd

, Primitive Methodism, p. 12; Lysons, Little Primitive, pp. 14–15. 152 E. Dorothy Graham, ‘Chosen by God: the female itinerants of early Primitive Method­­ ­ism’ (D.Phil. Thesis, University of Birmingham, 1986), p. 10. 153 PMM 8:3 (1828), 82; 8:8 (1828), 269. 154 ‘The founder of the Bible Christians,’ BCM 59:2 (1880), 71. O’Bryan’s parents and grandparents used the last name Brian or Bryant; the majority of his children chose the latter. O’Bryan himself was convinced, on little evidence, that he had Irish ancestry, and preferred the Irish spelling. His tombstone in

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism