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Stacy Gillis

This article provides a reading of gender politics in cyberpunk, drawing upon the Gothic, the cyborg and the (post)feminist subject. This reading is effected through an account of the ass-kicking techno-babe, a crucial component of the masculine strand of cyberpunk which valorises a masculinity and technology dialectic and draws upon film noir, with its hardboiled detectives and monstrous femmes fatales. From Molly Million‘s in Neuromancer to Y.T. in Neal Stephenson‘s Snow Crash (1992) and Trinity in Andy and Larry Wachowski‘s Matrix trilogy (1999–2003), this figure of the femme fatale demonstrates that the (post)feminist project of the ass-kicking techno-babe has found a home in the Gothic aesthetics of the noir-inf(l)ected genre of cyberpunk. The account of how hyper-sexualised cyborgic female bodies are positioned in contrast with the repressed bodies of male hackers reveals the destabilising conundrum of supposed agency contained by the determinacy of the (post)feminist body.

Gothic Studies
Postfeminist Vampirism in Margaret Atwood‘s The Robber Bride
Fiona Tolan

The article examines Margaret Atwood‘s The Robber Bride in terms of Gothic imagery and postfeminist politics. The novel depicts three characteristically second wave women whose lives are disrupted by Zenia, the embodiment of postfeminism. Zenia threatens the stability of the women and they respond to her with both loathing and desire, experiencing her as a vampire feeding on their lives. The Robber Bride connects the subversive power of Gothic to the multiple identities, transgressions and instabilities of postfeminism. Using a common second wave feminist psychoanalytic rereading of Gothic terror as fear of confinement, I suggest that Atwood‘s depiction of Zenia as a Gothic figure points to some concerns about second wave feminist politics. The location of Zenia as both Self and Other raises questions about postfeminisms situation as a reactionary backlash against feminism, and equally as a liberal politics that many late twentieth-century women were increasingly identifying with.

Gothic Studies
An Analysis of Cinenovas Management Committee Meeting Minutes, 1991–97
Julia Knight

Cinenova was relaunched in 1991 from the pre-existing womens distributor, Circles, which had operated throughout the 1980s. In keeping with their founders feminist politics, both Circles and Cinenova were run via a non-hierarchical management structure and focused on the distribution, promotion and exhibition of films and videos made by, for and about women. As the funding and economic climate became harsher during the 1990s this organisational model was severely tested, as Cinenova‘s workers were forced to try and survive on a more commercially viable basis. This article uses Cinenova‘s management committee meeting minutes of 1991–97 to explore how its management practices impacted on its operation and effectiveness.

Film Studies
Angela Carter and European Gothic
Author: Rebecca Munford

This book develops insights into the vexed question of Carter's textual practices through the dusty lens of the Gothic. It argues that European Gothic is vital to illuminating and understanding the tension between politics and aesthetics in Carter's work. The book shows how a more concerted focus on Carter's European literary inheritance sheds light on her particular and perverse engagements with androcentric literary and cultural frameworks. It emblematises the tension between her textual extravagancies and her self-declared 'absolute and committed materialism'. Her firm belief 'that this world is all that there is, and in order to question the nature of reality one must move from a strongly grounded base in what constitutes material reality'. The book examines the fraught relationship between Carter's sexual and textual politics. Exploring the ways in which Carter's work speaks to broader discussions about the Gothic and its representations, the book is especially concerned with analysing her textual engagements with a male-authored strand of European Gothic. This is a dirty lineage that can be mapped from the Marquis de Sade's obsession with desecration and defilement to surrealism's violent dreams of abjection. The book not only situates Carter as part of a European Gothic tradition but theoretically aligns her with what Jane Gallop, in her book on Sade, describes as France's "deconstructive" feminism, daughter of antihumanism.

A society in transition

In the last generation, Northern Ireland has undergone a tortuous yet remarkable process of social and political change. This book explores what Northern Ireland was like during violent conflict, and whether the situation is any different 'after the troubles'. It examines the political developments and divisions essential to a critical understanding of the nature of Northern Irish society. The book focuses a number of elements of popular cultural practice that are often overlooked when social scientists address Northern Ireland. Sport plays an important though often dispiriting role that in Northern Irish society. It looks at some of the problems and ways forward for transitional justice and memory work in Northern Ireland. The book reviews the history of strategic spatial policy in post-partition Northern Ireland. It draws on feminist scholarship to expose how explanations of the ethnic conflict that ignore gender are always partial. The book illustrates how feminist and gender politics are part of the political culture of Northern Ireland and offers conceptual resources to academics engaged in investigating the conflict. It further provides a brief outline of critical race theory (CRT) and the critique of whiteness therein before using it as a basis from which to examine the research literature on racism in Northern Ireland. The course that popular music has taken in Northern Ireland during 1990s of the peace process, is also considered and the most crucial issues of the peace process, police reform, are examined.

Tina O’Toole

in Britain and North America predominantly, meant that such social remittances, that is ideas, policies, actions and texts developed by theorists and activists abroad, became common currency within lesbian and feminist activist groups on the island of Ireland during the 1980s. One such broadside was Adrienne Rich’s important essay ‘On Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence’. While Rich is a poet and literary critic whose essay related specifically to lesbian feminist politics, this text had a reach which extended right across the spectrum of feminist

in Mobilising classics
Fiona Dukelow

’s arguments and perspective obsolete and of historical significance only. While the text, or portions of it, appear as canonical reading within feminist literature, it is used mostly to demonstrate a stage in the progression of feminist ideas and arguments, so that, as Nancy Bauer (2004: 116) puts it, reading Beauvoir is equivalent ‘to genuflecting on your way into the family pew’. However, reading Beauvoir should not be so readily dismissed or ­relegated to feminist annals, especially in a context where feminist politics has to grapple with the implications of post

in Mobilising classics
Abstract only
Mrinalini Sinha

histories to recognise their interaction in the age of imperialism. The first way in which the history of colonial masculinity can open up fresh possibilities is by providing the basis to reconsider the relationship between anti-colonial and feminist politics. Since contemporary political movements all over the world continue to be bedevilled by what is often presented as a stark choice between feminism and various

in Colonial masculinity
Abstract only
Heather Walton

CHAPTER 8 An open conclusion And if literature is still a girl … This book began by interrogating the relations between literature and theology as they are presented in contemporary theological thinking. I demonstrated that this interdisciplinary encounter has been constructed as a gendered relationship in which literature has functioned as the subordinated feminine term. I then argued that if ‘literature is a girl’ this no longer implies a continuing hierarchical relationship between the disciplines. Both feminist politics and poststructuralist theory have

in Literature, theology and feminism
Subjective realism, social disintegration and bodily affection in Lucrecia Martel’s La ciénaga (2001)
Julián Daniel Gutiérrez- Albilla

at the intersection, between Martel’s cinematic practice and Ettinger’s groundbreaking theoretical propositions, I will explore how La ciénaga offers a representational and critical alternative to an orthodox feminist political project, which remains confined to the subject of women’s rights, bodies, histories and oppressions, in the form of an identity-based representational mode of politics (del

in Hispanic and Lusophone women filmmakers