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Hilary Charlesworth
and
Christine Chinkin

Introduction This book uses feminist theories to sustain its claim that the absence of women in international law has distorted the discipline’s boundaries. The aim of this chapter is to introduce these theories and to consider their value in understanding international law. As a background to this task, we first discuss the theories that underpin traditional international

in The boundaries of international law
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author:

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

Contesting the ‘Female Gothic’ in Charlotte Dacre‘s Zofloya
Carol Margaret Davison

Taking Charlotte Dacre‘s unique and controversial novel, Zofloya; Or The Moor (1806), as its focal point, this essay takes stock of the strengths and limitations of the major theoretical engagements with the ‘Female Gothic’ under its diverse appellations, and consider them in terms of the history of Gothic theory more generally.

Gothic Studies
Sonja Boon

In this article I use conceptual frames drawn from autobiography studies and feminist theory to examine the relationships between bodily experience and the social construction of sex, gender and class as they play themselves out in a selection of womens medical consultation letters written to the eminent Swiss physician, Samuel-Auguste Tissot, during the second half of the eighteenth century. My analysis of a selection of consultation letters - all of which are situated and read in the context of a rich archival collection of some 1,200 letters - considers the role that bodily experience plays in the construction of self and suggests that not only the experience, but also the textual articulation of the body, were imagined both through and against accepted understandings of sex, gender and class during this period.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Open Access (free)
Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action 1
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

. J. and Hawkesworth , M. E. (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Feminist Theory ( Oxford and New York : Oxford University Press ), pp. 346 – 66 . Enarson , E. , Fothergill , A. and Peek , L

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Cathrine Brun
and
Cindy Horst

– towards an Ethic of “Social Flesh” ’, Feminist Theory , 8 : 3 , 279 – 98 . Beausoleil , E. ( 2015 ), ‘ Embodying an Ethics of Response-ability ’, Borderlands , 14 : 2 , 1 – 16 . Bennett , C. , Foley

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Gender Norm Change during Displacement?
Michelle Lokot

Fables: The Girl Effect and the Production of Sexual Subjects ’, Feminist Theory , 14 : 3 , 345 – 60 , doi: 10.1177/1464700113499855 . Turner , S. ( 2017 ), ‘ Victims of Chaos and Subaltern Sexualities? Some Reflections on Common Assumptions about Displacement and the Prevalence of Sexual and Gender-Based Violence ’, in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Imagining difference in 1950s New York painting

What did it mean to be a woman and a painter at the heart of abstract gestural painting in New York during the 1950s, if the iconic artist of that decade was Jackson Pollock, and the icon of Woman was Marilyn Monroe? Elaborating and explaining the relevance of theories of psycho-symbolic formations of sexual difference and their inscription in artistic practice, this book explores the 1950s triangulation Pollock–Monroe–Krasner, analysing how two painters of the two generations New York abstract artists, Lee Krasner and Helen Frankenthaler, negotiated this paradox artistically. Differencing a masculinized canon of Abstract Expressionism defiantly disseminated in recent blockbuster exhibitions, Pollock argues for a theoretically rich feminist reading of gestural abstract painting that centred the psycho-sexual body through gesture. She argues for a resonance with the cultural antithesis of New York gestural painting – its popular other – in the performance work of Marilyn Monroe, which exceeded the star’s iconic image of white sexuality. Igniting a still-urgent debate about difference, artmaking and artwriting, Pollock presents a transdisciplinary feminist intervention in the context of blockbuster exhibitions such as Abstract Expressionism (London and Bilbao, 2016–17) – which omitted almost entirely that school’s women members – and the women-only Women in Abstract Expressionism (USA 2018), Making Space: Women in Postwar Abstraction (New York, MoMA, 2018) and Women in Abstraction (Paris and Bilbao, 2021–22). as well as solo ‘rediscovery’ shows – Lee Krasner: Living Colour (London and Bilboa, 2019–20) and Helen Frankenthaler (Venice, 2019).

Theories, concepts and new perspectives

Bringing together leading authorities on Irish women and migration, this book offers a significant reassessment of the place of women in the Irish diaspora. It demonstrates the important role played by women in the construction of Irish diasporic identities, comparing Irish women's experience in Britain, Canada , New Zealand and the United States. The book considers how the Catholic Church could be a focal point for women's Irish identity in Britain. It examines how members of the Ladies' Orange Benevolent Association (LOBA) maintained a sense of Irish Protestant identity, focused on their associational life in female Orange lodges. The book offers a lens on Irish society, and on countries where they settled, and considerable scope for comparative analysis of the impact of different cultures and societies on women's lives. It reviews key debates in Transnational Studies (TS) and Diaspora Studies (DS) before discussing the particular contribution of DS in framing 1990s study of migrant and non-migrant Irish women. Feminist and queer theory scholarship in Irish DS has begun to address the gender and sexual politics of diaspora by attending to the dynamics of boundary expansion, queering and dissolution. The book suggests that religion can be both a 'bright' and a 'blurry' boundary, while examining how religious identities intersect with ethnicity and gender. It also includes the significance of the categories of gender and generation, and their intersection with ethnicity in the context of the official London St Patrick's Day Festival.

Fidelma Ashe

specific chapter, usually dedicated to examining the position of women in an ethnically divided society.4 This creates the impression that gender and feminism have little explanatory value beyond tracing and charting ‘women’s issues’. Zalewski contends that this means that gender becomes treated as a separate sphere of politics in relation to the ongoing ethno-nationalist antagonism in Northern Ireland. She claims that feminist work and feminist frameworks can be applied to Northern Irish politics in a broader fashion. For example, feminist theory can be utilised to

in Northern Ireland after the troubles