One of the key features of Jean-Jacques Beineix's relationship with the film image is the notion of seduction and the erotic. This book shows Beineix's films form a coherent body of work and sketches out a psychodrama formed by Beineix's feature films. It explains, the cinéma du look was placed by many, including Beineix himself, in a position of confrontation with the cinema of the nouvelle vague. The book considers the early 1980s debates concerning the film image which led to the view espoused by Jean-Michel Frodon, after a brief account of Beineix's apprenticeship years. It attempts to place Beineix's work within the context of the development of French cinema, and discourses on the French cinema, as they evolved during the 1980s. Beineix's first feature film, Diva, enjoyed considerable success, becoming something of a cult film for the youth audience of the time, as well as launching the careers of Richard Bohringer and Dominique Pinon. More than any of the films of the cinéma du look, La Lune dans le caniveau exemplifies the characteristics Bassan enumerates: a mise en scène, which privileges exuberance, light, movement, especially the curves and curls of the camera, and an emphasis on sensation. Bereavement after IP5 turned Beineix away from feature filmmaking, despite several propositions from American producers, Alien Resurrection and The Avengers among them.

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Christ; the present of Italy and the past of Italy (the Renaissance) and further back a classical past at the time of Christ; a film image and a painting; low culture and high culture; the profane and the sacred. These iconological and cultural comparisons have a musical extension: the music of the baroque Italian composer Antonio Vivaldi alternates with gypsy music. There is also a literary comparison and join: passages from Dante Alighieri’s Inferno of the thirteenth century read out in prison, a hell of its own where Ettore has been incarcerated. The noble poetry of

in Film modernism
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the early 1980s debates concerning the film image which led to the view espoused by Frodon, after a brief account of Beineix’s apprenticeship years. In doing so, considerable emphasis will be put on Beineix’s first three feature films, in so far as they help explain the vicissitudes of that debate. These first three feature films, each very different, are key moments of French cinema in the 1980s, and the least successful of

in Jean-Jacques Beineix
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, since they hint at themes which I shall be developing in this book, the relationship with the father, and the apparent conflict between the technical and desire. One of the key features of Beineix’s relationship with the film image is the notion of seduction and the erotic, as we shall see. Much like André Breton’s description of the erotic charge of a powerful image (which he describes as an ‘aigrette de vent aux tempes

in Jean-Jacques Beineix
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inadequacy, the difference of image from reality that Welles establishes in this film (and in all his other films). Its severity in Lady from Shanghai (and F for Fake) is directly related to Welles’s narrative approach. If generally, in most films, images are by themselves ambiguous and seldom clear, words and stories usually function to stabilise and anchor the image to give it meaning and precise significance (dialogue, narration, description, story), true in silent and sound films. Welles uses words differently: to question an image, unsettle it with doubt. The words of

in Film modernism
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­distant in time and in space. They are historically, and from certain points of view, remote, and, in ways not always explicable or clear, also close. Every photographed and filmed image is a double of the reality of which it is the image. The modern arts have played with this duplicity, the conversion of reality into a sign. They have also resisted it, pointing to the process by serialisation, repetition, parody, excessive artifice, or by distortion. The double (the image) is always second to the original. This is true, and absurdly so, when a found object is simply

in Film modernism

Cinema’ 1 Generally speaking, ‘Thoughts’ encapsulates the broad-spectrum tone of repudiation and negation which permeates Soul and Form . ‘Thoughts’ also focuses on four key aspects of the film medium: (1) the temporal nature of the medium (2) the relationship between film and the ‘present’ moment (3) the ‘naturalism’ of the film image, and (4) the

in Lukácsian film theory and cinema
The Specificity of the Aesthetic/Die Eigenart des Ästhetischen

’, ‘background’ or ‘perspectives’ (Lukács, 1913 ), the film image reinforces the conditions of fragmentation and reification which characterise the subordination of consciousness within modernity, and, in consequence, becomes just one more ‘fragmented’ element in the ‘web of a thousand strands’ or objectivations which entrap consciousness (Márkus, in Heller (ed.), 1983 : 6

in Lukácsian film theory and cinema
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Destructuring In a Ford or Hawks film images follow one another in accord with the action that is taking place. Whatever may be discontinuous between the images is ‘covered’ by a logic of events, drama or action. Thus, discontinuity is unnoticeable and the film, however fragmented it may be, appears seamless. The seamlessness has an effect of appearing natural (realistic) and therefore transparent (clear). If what is represented in an image seems to be the consequence of a prior action and set of events, the system is a closed one, closed off from anything

in Film modernism
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realistic aims achieved by unrealistic means. The arts take you not to reality but to another world, parallel and distinct from the world whose signs call to figures and objects that the world can never reach while separating the arts from reality in order to see things better, that is, imaginatively, as if, in order to see things as they are, you have to see things other than they are, differently. The film image functions best

in Montage