Search results

Alison Tara Walker

information that is not present in the films’ visual story. These films question the subservient position of the soundtrack within most films, which traditionally relegates film music to the background in favour of the onscreen images. 1 Music is integral to the filmic process, and does not simply accompany onscreen images. So, too, can the study of film music serve as a powerful analytic tool for critics

in Medieval film
Abstract only

Fork Murphy J. J. December 2004 5 5 1 1 92 92 105 105 10.7227/FS.5.8 Dossier Hans Keller Essays on Film Music Wintle Christopher Keller Hans December 2004 5 5 1 1 106 106 131 131 10.7227/FS.5.9 Book Reviews Reviews Christie Ian December

Abstract only

Everett Wendy December 2006 9 9 1 1 29 29 39 39 10.7227/FS.9.6 Holding onto Moments in The Age of Innocence Peacock Steven December 2006 9 9 1 1 40 40 50 50 10.7227/FS.9.7 The Days Do Not End Film Music, Time and Bernard Herrmann Butler David December 2006 9 9 1 1 51 51 63 63 10.7227/FS.9.8 Ten Minutes For

Abstract only
Essays on Film Music
Christopher Wintle and Hans Keller

Among the musical Hitler Émigrés from Vienna to London, pride of place has often been accorded to Hans Keller, a psychologically-minded critic (or, as he described himself, ‘anti-critic’) who dominated the British musical scene for the 40 years that followed 1945. In the period 1946-1959 he devoted himself assiduously to film music, on the one hand laying out the topics that a ‘competent film music critic’ would need to address, and on the other paying scrupulous attention to everything he saw and heard. He shared with Theodor Adorno a loathing of Hollywood, and championed British composers above most others. This selection comes in advance of the publication of his collected writings on film, Film Music and Beyond (London, Plumbago, 2005), and shows on the one hand his topical writings, dealing with the importance of actually listening to film-music, ‘noise as leitmotif’, the contribution of psychology to understanding the function of film music, and classical quotations in film, and on the other hand his writing on composers, including Arthur Benjamin, Georges Auric, William Alwyn, Leonard,Bernstein (On the Waterfront) and Anton Karas (The Third Man).

Film Studies
Abstract only
Film Music, Time and Bernard Herrmann
David Butler

The tendency in most writing on the temporal properties of film music has been to note music‘s ability to establish, quickly and efficiently, a films historical setting. Although acknowledging this important function, this paper seeks to explore a wider range of temporal properties fulfilled by film music. Three aspects of musics temporality are discussed: anachronism (whereby choices of anachronistic music can provide the spectator with ways of making sense of a films subtext or its characters’ state of mind), navigation (the ability of music to help the spectator understand where and when they are in a films narrative) and expansion (musics ability to expand our experience of film time). The paper focuses on Bernard Herrmann, and his score for Taxi Driver (1976), and argues that Herrmann was particularly sensitive to the temporal possibilities of film music.

Film Studies
Terence Davies and the Paradoxes of Time
Wendy Everett

This article examines the paradoxes inherent in filmic time, with particular reference to the autobiographical work of the British director Terence Davies. Analysing ways in which film, itself constructed from still images, can create, reverse or freeze temporal flux, confuse and blend multiple and conflicting temporalities, and create the spatial dimensions of an ‘imaginary’ time, it argues that the relationship between film and music may well provide a fundamental key to the understanding of filmic time.

Film Studies
Lorraine Yeung

This article investigates the emotive potency of horror soundtracks. The account illuminates the potency of aural elements in horror cinema to engage spectators body in the light of a philosophical framework of emotion, namely, the embodied appraisal theories of emotion. The significance of aural elements in horror cinema has been gaining recognition in film studies. Yet it still receives relatively scarce attention in the philosophical accounts of film music and cinematic horror, which tend to underappreciate the power of horror film sound and music in inducing emotions. My investigation aims both to address the lacuna, and facilitate dialogue between the two disciplines.

Film Studies
Critical essays on Bernard Herrmann and Alfred Hitchcock

For a decade from 1955, Alfred Hitchcock worked almost exclusively with one composer: Bernard Herrmann. From The Trouble with Harry to the bitter spat surrounding Torn Curtain, the partnership gave us some of cinema’s most memorable musical moments, taught us to stay out of the shower, away from heights and never to spend time in corn fields. Consequently, fascination with their work and relationship endures fifty years later. This volume of new, spellbinding essays explores their tense working relationship as well as their legacy, from crashing cymbals to the sound of The Birds.

The volume brings together new work and new perspectives on the relationship between Hitchcock and Herrmann. Featuring new essays by leading scholars of Hitchcock’s work, including Richard Allen, Charles Barr, Murray Pomerance, Sidney Gottlieb, and Jack Sullivan, the volume examines the working relationship between the pair and the contribution that Herrmann’s work brings to Hitchcock’s idiom. Examining key works, including The Man Who Knew Too Much, Psycho, Marnie and Vertigo, the collection explores approaches to sound, music, collaborative authorship and the distinctive contribution that Herrmann’s work with Hitchcock brought to this body of films.

Partners in Suspense examines the significance, meanings, histories and enduring legacies of one of film history’s most important partnerships. By engaging with the collaborative work of Hitchcock and Herrmann, the essays in the collection examine the ways in which film directors and composers collaborate, how this collaboration is experienced in the film text, and the ways such a partnership inspires later work.

Abstract only
Sound and music
Andrew Dix

occur in all actual audio-viewing situations (from crowded multiplex to family living-room). Are they right to argue that the composed soundtrack should be inserted into this larger acoustic context? Film music Edward Bast, an earnest young composer in William Gaddis’s novel J R (1975), finds himself having to undertake some commercial projects in order to keep body and soul together. He is particularly dismayed, however, when one film producer requests from him ‘some nothing music’, which, so as to leave intact the sovereignty of

in Beginning film studies (second edition)
Abstract only
The music of Eric Serra in the films of Luc Besson
Mark Brownrigg

a composer of pop scores into a writer of full-blown orchestral film music. In Le Dernier combat we find the germ of Serra’s style: cues constructed from repeating riffs, more freely improvised material and longline, quasi-song form structures. In Subway , Serra expands this last into full-blown pop songs and begins to incorporate a growing number of exotic influences into his style. While

in The films of Luc Besson