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Abstract only
With an introduction by Benjamin J. Cohen
Author: Susan Strange

This book begins with a recapitulation of the main themes of Strange's earlier Casino Capitalism, stressing the major policy decisions and non-decisions that, in her opinion, had first allowed financial markets seemingly to outgrow governmental control. It adds a number of newer systemic developments that had emerged in the years after Casino Capitalism was published. Following this opening tour d'horizon, the book evaluates many of these developments in greater detail, covering the revolution in information technology interstate politics, contagion risks, global debt, money laundering and the roles of both national governments and multilateral agencies such as the International Monetary Fund and Bank for International Settlements. Great emphasis is placed on the relationship between the United States and Japan, the 'US-Japan axis', which is considered crucial to the effective management of financial crises. All the strings of Strange's discussion are pulled together where she turns her eyes to the future. Most financial research at the time seemed biased toward midlevel theory building, focusing primarily on key relationships within a broader structure whose characteristics were assumed, normally, to be given and stable. The book discusses hypotheses about the most important changes that have affected the global financial system and the international political economy. Key decisions, or non-decisions in the case of failures to act when positive action would have been possible, are also discussed.

Meeting the challenge of internal security
Emil Kirchner and James Sperling

organised crime, or when it brings EU member states into an intractable conflict with transit countries less likely or able to police their own borders. Money laundering and financial crime The drug trade forged the chief nexus between money laundering and organised crime in the early 1990s. Money laundering had attracted the attention of national law enforcement agencies as an

in EU security governance
Abstract only
Joe McGrath

‘respectable’ company officers to be criminally prosecuted like ordinary criminals, then this had changed. It was understood that corporate wrongdoing could damage the security of the State in ways that are at least as harmful as ‘street crime’. People wanted accountability and corporate and financial crime became politicised. Politicians stated that white-collar criminals were guilty of economic treason and should be treated like terrorists. The State pledged to be tough on white-collar crime and introduced tougher new laws involving the increased use of strict liability

in Corporate and white-collar crime in Ireland
Abstract only
Susan Strange

financial crime that have received much less public attention, but which may constitute much more serious threats to the viability of the world market economy. It will be argued that, from the point of view of damage and risk to public confidence in the international political economy, money laundering is much less serious an issue than, for example, tax evasion, private fraud or public embezzlement. Why these are overlooked or even tolerated is one of those questions that political economists are right to pose and that economists for the most part do not even consider

in Mad Money
Abstract only
Wilhelm Vosse and Paul Midford

counter-piracy mission off the coast of Somalia, which has become one of the cornerstones of security practice between Japan and the EU, Australia and India. Cyber-attacks, emergency and disaster management, and emergencies or financial crimes are just some of the non-traditional security threats for which security partnerships are the ideal framework for cooperation, because they are flexible, are based on trust built from long-term cooperation in other areas, and do not openly balance against a specific adversary. However, long-term cooperation in countering

in Japan's new security partnerships
Managing the criminal facets of war economies
Jenny H. Peterson

there were also Special Prosecutors Offices for serious crimes such as financial crimes which were set up specifically to deal with the criminal side of the post-war economy. With independence, the EU-led EULEX mission operates in Kosovo, monitoring and assisting in some criminal cases. Alongside these judicial measures, the UN mission sought to strengthen the RoL by creating new security institutions. Two key domestic security institutions were established in the immediate post-conflict phase, the Kosovo Protection Corps (KPC) and the Kosovo Police Service (KPS). The

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)
Protecting borders, confirming statehood and transforming economies?
Jenny H. Peterson

trade irregularities which often indicate illegal trade, tax evasion and money laundering. These financial crimes are often part of the war/postwar economies that have been discussed throughout this book, given their links to smuggling and political corruption and that they are often committed by actors who are continuing with or consolidating politicaleconomic gains made during the conflict. Further, as customs violations have become one of the most common forms of financial crime (Courakis, 2001; Sarvananthan, 2001; Velkova and Georgievski, 2004), addressing them is

in Building a peace economy?
Abstract only
Global security architectures and civil society since 9/ 11
Scott N. Romaniuk and Emeka Thaddues Njoku

action group, peace groups, human rights organisations. Following the narrative of CSOs’ vulnerability to terrorism, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), an organization created in 1989 by the G-7 to address financial crimes, established Recommendation 8. The FATF recommendations direct states and financial organizations to establish new ranges

in Counter-terrorism and civil society
Joe McGrath

of transparency and disclosure in corporate enterprise by making these documents available for public inspection so that people could make more informed decisions about their dealings and investments with companies. Crucially, however, these bodies were not significantly concerned with prosecuting corporate or financial crime until late in the twentieth century, if at all. Section 385 of the Primary Act empowered the Minister and the Attorney General (subsequently the DPP) to prosecute the summary offences in the Companies Acts. The enforcement role of the Irish

in Corporate and white-collar crime in Ireland
Abstract only
Joe McGrath

). Moreover, the public demand for books on corporate and financial crime in Ireland is significant. This is evidenced by contemporary publications on this topic by Cooper (2009, 2011), Ross (2009, 2012), Ross and Webb (2012), O’Toole (2009), Kelly (2012), Lyons and Carey (2011), Carswell (2011), McDonald and Sheridan (2009), Murphy and Devlin (2009), McDonald (2010), Lewis (2011) and Lyons and Curran (2013). Most of this research, however, is anecdotal (O’hOgartaigh, 2011). The sudden surge of interest in regulation in academia, government and journalism lacks a tradition

in Corporate and white-collar crime in Ireland