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Some key issues in understanding its competitive production and regulation
Terry Marsden

chap 6 13/8/04 4:23 pm Page 129 6 Theorising food quality: some key issues in understanding its competitive production and regulation Terry Marsden Introduction Recent debates concerning food quality offer an important window on the changing nature of broader social, political and economic relations. Not least, this has reinforced a more serious concern with understanding food consumption processes; through more theorisation and conceptualisation of social and natural factors in the context of wider consumption trends and processes (see Goodman 2002). In

in Qualities of food
Open Access (free)

This book explores the new applications of established theories or adapts theoretical approaches in order to illuminate behaviour in the field of food. It focuses on social processes at the downstream end of the food chain, processes of distribution and consumption. The book reviews the existing disciplinary approaches to understanding judgements about food taste. It suggests that the quality 'halal' is the result of a social and economic consensus between the different generations and cultures of migrant Muslims as distinct from the non-Muslim majority. Food quality is to be viewed in terms of emergent cognitive paradigms sustained within food product networks that encompass a wide range of social actors with a wide variety of intermediaries, professional and governmental. The creation of the Food Standards Agency (FSA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) occurred at a juncture when perceptions of policy failure were acknowledged at United Kingdom and European Union governmental levels. The book presents a case study of retailer-led food governance in the UK to examine how different 'quality logics' actually collide in the competitive world of food consumption and production. It argues that concerns around food safety were provoked by the emergence of a new food aesthetic based on 'relationalism' and 'embeddedness'. The book also argues that the study of the arguments and discourses deployed to criticise or otherwise qualify consumption is important to the political morality of consumption.

Globalising kosher and halal markets
Authors: John Lever and Johan Fischer

Over the last two decades, global demand for kosher products has been growing steadily, and many non-religious consumers view kosher as a healthy food option: in the US over 60 per cent of kosher food consumption is linked to non-religious values associated with health and food quality. This book explores the emergence and expansion of global kosher and halal markets with a particular focus on the UK and Denmark. While Kosher is a Hebrew term meaning 'fit' or 'proper', halal is an Arabic word that literally means 'permissible' or 'lawful'. The book discusses the manufacture and production of kosher and halal meat (both red meat and poultry) with specific reference to audits/inspections, legislation, networking, product innovation and certification. It draws on contemporary empirical material to explore kosher and halal comparatively at different levels of the social scale, such as individual consumption, the marketplace, religious organisations and the state. It compares the major markets for kosher/halal in the UK with those in Denmark, where kosher/halal are important to smaller groups of religious consumers. Denmark plays an important role in biotechnology that is compatible with what we call kosher/halal transnational governmentality. The book explores how Jewish and Muslim consumers in the UK and Denmark understand and practice kosher consumption in their everyday lives. It also explores how 'compound practice' links eating with issues such as health and spirituality, for example, and with the influence of secularism and ritual.

Open Access (free)
A cognitive perspective
Gilles Allaire

chap 3 13/8/04 4:14 pm Page 61 3 Quality in economics: a cognitive perspective1 Gilles Allaire Introduction The importance of food quality issues in the contemporary global context is well established. Since the early 1990s we have seen developments in nutrition, life sciences and biotech programmes; the setting up of food quality standards in Europe as well as in other OECD countries; the heightened focus of the media on food issues and a series of food safety crises. On the market side these trends have included a reconsideration of business strategy on

in Qualities of food
Ian Miller

demonstrates that the advance of consumerism in Ireland was met with new forms of scientific engagement with consumers and producers that encouraged food quality to be considered in new ways. The type of ‘quality’ endorsed in this rhetoric of purity differed profoundly from the ‘quality’ identified in mid-century nutritional discourse. Rather than outlining which foodstuffs were healthy or unhealthy for the human system, as mid-century nutritional scientists had done, those concerned about the retail of diseased meat and adulterated food pinpointed biological threats in

in Reforming food in post-Famine Ireland
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Quality and processes of qualification
Mark Harvey, Andrew McMeekin, and Alan Warde

engaging has been the range of views concerning judgement of quality (and how that relates to the processes of qualification). Less consolidation, more fuel for further debate, this most persistent of social science issues, the basis on which hierarchies of judgement are established, is revealed to be highly contested, even within the social sciences: quality as highly contingent or quality as objective attribute. Broadening the food quality question The book has collected together a number of contrasting approaches to quality of food. In adopting particular theoretical

in Qualities of food
David Barling

final break-up of MAFF took place in June 2001, with its remaining responsibilities being reconstructed within a new Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), in the wake of the foot-and-mouth crisis. The political resonance of foot-andmouth as a bio-security threat lay in its impact on the perception of the food quality and economic value of UK and European meat rather than in its animal health implications alone. A further product of the response to policy failure in the UK was a review of the future of farming and food in the UK, called the Curry

in Qualities of food
Open Access (free)
Mark Harvey, Andrew McMeekin, and Alan Warde

constitute the food chain. Food has many qualities which attract public attention. The issue of food quality is widely construed as closely involving the consumer. The problem that has arisen from food crises is described as the decline of consumer trust or confidence. And it is at the points of transfer to and use by consumers that the issue of quality actually bites. New strategies for developing trust, from European Commission (EC) policies designed to increase the openness and transparency of the food chain to attempts to reduce the distance and number of steps between

in Qualities of food
Open Access (free)
Relational reflexivity in the ‘alternative’ food movement
Jonathan Murdoch and Mara Miele

chap 7 13/8/04 4:17 pm Page 156 7 A new aesthetic of food? Relational reflexivity in the ‘alternative’ food movement Jonathan Murdoch and Mara Miele Introduction In recent times, an apparent contradiction between high levels of output and improved food quality has arisen within the food sector. The development of mass food markets, alongside ‘Fordist’ methods of production and their associated economies of scale, has generated unprecedented abundance (Montanari 1994). Yet, at the same time, industrialisation processes have resulted, seemingly, in greater and

in Qualities of food
Abstract only
Emma Robertson

. Such local developments are part of a broader national trend in the industry related to concerns over food quality and ethical consumption, as well as a belief in the health benefits of dark chocolate with a high cocoa content. Even the large industrial manufacturers have launched products containing over 50 per cent cocoa in order to appeal to a more ‘discerning’ consumer, though they have struggled

in Chocolate, women and empire