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Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

. Supported by impactful quotes from asylum seekers who survived violence and war, she elaborates on how strong community ties – largely face-to-face – give way to the formation of weak ties in the face of forced migration. To some extent these interactions allow refugees to restore connections and obtain vital information for their life in an unfamiliar environment. Her findings suggest that these weak ties prove to be particularly useful to those who are illiterate and, rather paradoxically, to those

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Paul Currion

), ‘ Data Hubris? Humanitarian Information Systems and the Mirage of Technology’ , Third World Quarterly , doi: 10.1080/01436597.2015.1136208 . Sandvik , K. B. ( 2014 ), ‘ Humanitarian Innovation, Humanitarian Renewal?’ , Forced Migration Review Supplement: Innovation and Refugees . Sandvik , K. B. ( 2017 ), ‘ Now is

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation
Tom Scott-Smith

Quarterly , 34 : 5 , 913 – 28 . Scott-Smith , T. ( 2016 ), ‘ Humanitarian Neophilia: The “Innovation Turn” and Its Implications ’, Third World Quarterly , 37 : 12 , 2229 – 51 . Scott-Smith , T. ( 2017 ), ‘ The Humanitarian–Architect Divide ’, Forced Migration

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

? ’, Forced Migration Review , a00101s1 , 25 – 7 . Sandvik , K. B. , Jacobsen , K. L. and McDonald , S. M. ( 2017 ), ‘ Do No Harm: A Taxonomy of the Challenges of Humanitarian Experimentation ’, International Review of the Red Cross , 99 : 904 , 319 – 44

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

Palestinian Refugees after US Cuts ’, Daily Star , 31 January , www.dailystar.com.lb/News/LebanonNews/2018/Jan-31/436293-un-appeal-may-be-lifeline-for-palestinian-refugees-after-us-cuts.ashx (accessed May 2018) . Akram , S. M. ( 2014 ), ‘ UNRWA and Palestinian Refugees ’, in Fiddian-Qasmiyeh , E. , Loescher , G. , Long , K. and Sigona , N. (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies ( Oxford : Oxford University Press ). Akram , S. M. ( 2018 ), ‘ The Trump Administration

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Abstract only
Transcultural identities and art-making in a globalised world

Migration, understood as the movement of people and cultures, gives impetus to globalisation and the transculturation processes that the interaction between people and cultures entails. This book addresses migration as a profoundly transforming force that has remodelled artistic and art institutional practices across the world. It explores contemporary art's critical engagement with migration and globalisation as a key source for improving our understanding of how these processes transform identities, cultures, institutions and geopolitics. The book also explores three interwoven issues of enduring interest: identity and belonging, institutional visibility and recognition of migrant artists, and the interrelations between aesthetics and politics, and its representations of forced migration. Transculturality indicates a certain quality (of an idea, an object, a self-perception or way of living) which joins a variety of elements indistinguishable as separate sources. The topic of migration is permeated not only with political but also with ethical urgencies. The most telling sign of how profoundly the mobility turn has affected the visual arts is perhaps the spread of the term global art in the discourses on art, where it is often used as a synonym for internationally circulating contemporary art. The book examines interventions by three artists who take a critical de- and postcolonial approach to the institutional structures and spaces of Western museums. The book also looks at the politics of representation, and particularly the question of how aesthetics, politics and ethics can be triangulated and balanced when artists seek to make visible the conditions of irregular migration.

Tony Kushner

terms. In 1945 and 1946 more than 700 Jewish child survivors were flown to Britain for them to recuperate. Roughly 300 were temporarily housed in the Lake District which was regarded as ganeydn (Yiddish for paradise) and the ‘promised land’.3 As one of the former children, Michael Perlmutter recalls, ‘I was reborn in Windermere in 1945. The promise of England was a dream to a teenage boy who no longer believed he could believe in dreams.’4 Alongside slavery at the extreme of forced migration were those deported to their deaths as part of the Nazis’ ‘Final Solution

in The battle of Britishness
Abstract only
Anne Ring Petersen

world, the global increase in forced migration does give reason for serious concern about the growing stigmatisation of irregular migrants and refugees as ‘crimmigrant’ others (Aas), and about the ways in which the securitisation and fortification of borders increase the citizenship gap and jeopardise migrants’ lives by forcing them to undertake perilous journeys. Such concerns gave impetus to Chapter 6, Conclusion which examined the nexus of forced migration, border control, securitisation and humanitarianism through the lens of some contemporary works of art

in Migration into art
Catherine Baker

- and twentieth-century history, however, is (in the prevailing paradigm) primarily a history of (what are constructed as) settled mono-ethnic nations forming states and engaging in territorial disputes which have often led to forced migration when perpetrators of ethnicised violence purge those they identify as minorities from what they intend as homogenous national territories, but which are rarely viewed in the context of migration around the globe. Histories of ‘race’, however, are always and already migration histories. White Europeans

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?
Catherine Baker

formation, forced migration and genocide that invite seeing its past and present through the lens of ethnopolitical and religious conflict. Moreover, as part of ‘eastern’ rather than ‘western’ Europe, and without its own history as an imperial power, it did not experience the mass migration from outside ‘Europe’ of millions of people whose identities would be racialised as non-white. Studies of how ideas of ‘race’ have circulated and been adapted across the globe, for their part, themselves still almost always pass over the east of Europe and its state socialist past. The

in Race and the Yugoslav region