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An Interview with Celso Amorim, Former Brazilian Foreign Minister
Juliano Fiori

against Préval and nothing to gain from him either. When this moment arrived, after speaking with Lula and [Chilean President Ricardo] Lagos – because Chile had troops in Haiti and the civilian head of MINUSTAH was Chilean, so it was important that we were aligned – I said to Condoleezza Rice: ‘Brazilian troops won’t shoot at civilians.’ People were on the streets and there was a lot of tension, but the Americans wanted a second round. Despite electoral fraud affecting him negatively, Préval was on 48.5 per cent, the second-placed candidate on 10 or 11

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

, 2009 ). In what follows, I use examples from the areas of refugee management and nutrition to illustrate this point. A key objective of international refugee management is to reduce fraud, one type of which is repeated registration by the same individual, or registration by those who do not qualify as recipients. In the past, UNHCR tried to avoid multiple registrations by using stamps, wristbands, photographs, fingerprints or biometrics ( UNHCR, n.d.b ). I will show how

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Abstract only
Volume 3 Management, mergers and fraud 1987–1993
Author: John Wilson

The final volume of this detailed history of Ferranti covers the last seven years of its operating existence, starting with the 1987 merger with ISC and culminating in a humiliating demise consequent upon GEC’s 1993 decision to withdraw its bid for what by then was an unprofitable rump. Extensive attention is paid to the way in which ISC evolved under James Guerin’s stewardship, providing insights into the shady world of international covert arms dealing. While in 1987 Ferranti purchased what was regarded as a highly profitable defence electronics business, by 1989 it was apparent that ISC’s net worth was marginal, creating an accounting hole in what by then was Ferranti International from which it never recovered, in spite of highly imaginative strategies enacted by a new chief executive, Eugene Anderson. The book provides detailed insights into international mergers, corporate governance issues and defence electronics that highlight the dangers associated with competing in one of the fastest-moving industries of that era.

John Wilson

underpinned ISC’s recent expansion, Ferranti was never going to be able to extract full value from its acquisition. Of course, there were sound reasons why the Ferranti board permitted this arrangement, even if in retrospect it is now possible to say that it prevented an earlier discovery of the fraud perpetrated by Guerin. Above all, though, returning to a key theme of the last chapter, the Ferranti board had placed their trust in Guerin and his Proxy Board, in the expectation that the combined firms would generate the kind of benefits anticipated from the summer of 1987

in Ferranti: A History
Abstract only
Mike Buckle and John Thompson

insurance (PPI), fraud and the rigging of LIBOR and the foreign exchange (forex) markets. PPI PPI policies were designed to provide cover for loans and credit card debt in the event of the person insured being unable to make the necessary repayments, for example due to illness. The problem for banks is that such policies were mis-sold. Extreme examples of

in The UK financial system (fifth edition)
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John Wilson

, acute illiquidity arising from the ISC fraud significantly limited management’s ability to pursue more ambitious strategies, because not only were the divisions/business units starved of development funds, but also customers proved reluctant to place substantial contracts with Ferranti International. As the board was constantly reminded, debts owed to unsecured creditors grew to dangerous levels in the early 1990s, highlighting the constant danger of bankruptcy at a time when politicians were reluctant to interfere with the free play of market forces and use taxpayers

in Ferranti: A History
Open Access (free)
Criminality during the occupation
James E. Connolly

-​Roubaix-​Tourcoing, for which sources are comprehensive. I aim to assess the possibilities and peculiarities of occupied life, to demonstrate the multitude of actions and decisions open to occupied civilians willing to infringe upon social and legal conventions. By doing so, I will shed light on further ‘dark spots’ in the history of the occupation. This chapter considers the situation of the French police force before examining the most common occupation crimes:  theft, fraud and smuggling. Such actions were tools for survival for certain occupés, yet they clearly infringed upon

in The experience of occupation in the Nord, 1914– 18
Abstract only
John Wilson

6 The rescue strategy HILE THE LAST chapter has outlined the exhaustive nature of the multiagency investigation into the fraud and other crimes perpetrated by Guerin and his closest associates, culminating in a fifteen-year jail sentence for the former ISC chief executive, we now have to analyse how those left with the horrendous task of effecting a recovery of Ferranti International coped with this enormous challenge. The fraud had created a huge hole in the company’s accounts, estimated at approximately £400 million, while the acquisition of bank debt

in Ferranti: A History
Tobias B. Hug

-called imposture, as when in 1417, the Lollard martyr Sir John Oldcastle, suffering for his belief, identified himself with Christ and claimed he would rise again three days after his death, a link quite common in the context of martyrology.5 Moreover, false pilgrims and pardoners, as well as forged relics and miracles, were familiar pre-Reformation phenomena,6 along with the hypocritical priest, who became a powerful topos.7 Religious fraud was obviously an issue long before the period considered here. The Church dismissed many claims as fraudulent, though a few were accepted

in Impostures in early modern England
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Myrto Tsakatika

Introduction The resignation of the Santer Commission On 16 March 1999, for the first time in the history of the European project, the twenty-member College of Commissioners resigned before the end of its term. This took place under the presidency of the former Prime Minister of Luxembourg Jacques Santer, after the submission to the European Parliament (EP) of a Report by a Committee of Independent Experts, working under the auspices of the Parliament and the Commission, which substantiated allegations of fraud, mismanagement and nepotism. The Report came two

in Political responsibility and the European Union