4 Fair trade and free market This place here, this isn’t Ireland at all. This is another world! The law of the land doesn’t apply here. This is Shell country. It’s like the army zone in Baghdad. They’re a law unto themselves and the [local] law is on their side – the guards, the government, the army, the courts, the media. . . . It’s like something straight out of the ‘X Files.’ It’s beyond belief! (Note from a fireside conversation, Shell to Sea solidarity camp, Rossport, Co. Mayo, June 20091) The space and time of this story are the mythic world of

in The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
Neoliberalism, Zombies and the Failure of Free Trade

The popular cultural ubiquity of the zombie in the years following the Second World War is testament to that monster‘s remarkable ability to adapt to the social anxieties of the age. From the red-scare zombie-vampire hybrids of I Am Legend (1954) onwards, the abject alterity of the ambulant dead has been deployed as a means of interrogating everything from the war in Vietnam (Night of the Living Dead, 1968) to the evils of consumerism (Dawn of the Dead, 1978). This essay explores how, in the years since 9/11, those questions of ethnicity and gender, regionality and power that have haunted the zombie narrative since 1968 have come to articulate the social and cultural dislocations wrought by free-market economics and the shock doctrines that underscore the will to global corporatism. The article examines these dynamics through consideration of the figure of the zombie in a range of contemporary cultural texts drawn from film, television, graphic fiction, literature and gaming, each of which articulates a sense not only neo-liberalism itself has failed but simply wont lie down and die. It is therefore argued that in an age of corporate war and economic collapse, community breakdown and state-sanctioned torture, the zombie apocalypse both realises and works through the failure of the free market, its victims shuffling through the ruins, avatars of the contemporary global self.

Gothic Studies
The past, present and future of social democracy and the welfare state

This book outlines the reasons for the development of and need for social democracy and the welfare state. It begins with the reaffirmation that post-2008 Anglo-America has seen the greatest concentration of wealth since the Great Depression, some nine decades earlier. The book reviews the thought of classical liberals like Adam Smith, democratic theorists like Alexis De Tocqueville and Matthew Arnold, and early social democrats like John Stuart Mill and Beatrice Webb. It further details the reasons for the derailing of the welfare state. Milton Friedman's ideas about the free market were institutionalized by Ronald Reagan in the US and Margaret Thatcher in the UK, both of whom dismantled the welfare state, or as much of it as possible. The book talks about the collapse of the Grand Narrative of the Left in the 1980s and 1990s. How this led to the 'great forgetting' in Anglo-America, and to a lesser extent in continental European social democracies and welfare states as well, is discussed. The book argues that 'forgetting' the past success of social democracy has been costly. It highlights that globalization does not explain unemployment in Anglo-America; nor is it the cause of inequality in either the US or the UK. A comparison of Anglo-America's social model with the European social model of the welfare and social democratic states of continental Europe, follows. Even with the high unemployment rates of the European Union, most of Europe is still as economically efficient as the US and the UK.

History, culture and character

spoken, the familiar, and the parochial’ (2006: 15). This observation could be applied to the three novels discussed in this chapter: Julian Barnes’ England, England (1998), Monica Ali’s Brick Lane (2003) and Philip Hensher’s The Northern Clemency (2008a). However, our focus will be on how each of these novels registers the growth of the free market and its effect on

in These Englands
Abstract only

10 David Willetts Conservative thought at its best conveys the mutual dependence between the community and the free market. David Willetts, 19921 D avid Willetts’s contribution to Conservatism is more substantial than that of anyone else at a senior level in the Party since the downfall of Margaret Thatcher in 1990. He has been involved in all of the major debates over the future ideological direction of the Conservative Party since then – the direction that the Major Government should take, the development of social liberal ideas after 1997 and the emergence

in Conservative thinkers

emerged under the auspices of the spirit of Hermes’ free market. In the 1960s, following a long period of moribund economic stagnation and mass emigration, the Irish state decisively abandoned the development model of autarchic economic self-sufficiency based on family farms and small business, and embraced the free market. Joining the European Economic Community on one side, and attracting foreign direct investment by American transnational corporations by offering low taxes and access to European markets on the other, Ireland became a crossroads of economic

in The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
Abstract only

: traditional Toryism, New Right, Centrist and One Nation.8 The essential features of traditional Toryism are a concern with the preservation of the social order, a strong attachment to the nation and the preservation of the authority of the state. Many of the ideas of the traditionalist approach were articulated by Lord Salisbury. In the 1970s the free-market strand of Conservatism began to reassert itself. For some the free market was required to uphold the core values of traditional Toryism, and hence the traditionalist position morphed into the New Right. However, the

in Conservative thinkers
A summing up

8 Europe versus America: a summing up Today Europe is in crisis. Nevertheless, in the last sixty years, Europe achieved a quiet revolution, hardly mentioned – and sometimes denied – in the American media. In these postwar decades, Europe reached a balance between individual property rights and the common good, between the free market and government regulation, between the unmitigated freedom of enterprise and cooperative partnerships between business, labor, and government, between liberty and equality, and between equality and fraternity. America, with its

in The great forgetting
Abstract only

relationship between imperfect or regulated markets and corrupt behaviour. The logic of this approach implies that free markets are the best deterrent against corrupt behaviour. This is an especially pertinent issue in the field of development economics where Third World countries are the recipients of economic aid and charity. Funds do not always flow directly to the point of need and are often tapped as they pass through the hands of politicians and officials. International banking and development institutions including the IMF, the World Bank and the OECD have been keen

in From virtue to venality
Abstract only

specific individuals. As soon as the operations of the free market are perceived as failing to deliver general prosperity, it is inevitable that social engineers will step into the breach, promising a route to the same objective which can be made to sound much less metaphysical and (crucially) much quicker.17 In the post-war period, politicians had surrounded themselves with ‘expert’ advisers of this stamp, offering rational roads to prosperity. Over 76 angus maude time, politicians of both main parties had even adopted their ‘technocratic’ language. Thus far, the

in Conservative thinkers