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Institutionalized gesture politics?
Joy C. Kwesiga

GENDER EQUALITY IN UGANDA 203 10 The national machinery for gender equality in Uganda: institutionalized gesture politics? joy c. kwesiga Introduction National machineries for the advancement of women are an accepted feature of many United Nations (UN) member states, having progressively gained ground during the 1975– 85 UN Decade for Women and in subsequent UN Conferences on women which called for their strengthening. The Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) has observed that lack of appropriate structures officially mandated to implement the agenda for the

in Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?
Birgitta Åseskog

146 CASE STUDIES 7 National machinery for gender equality in Sweden and other Nordic countries birgitta åseskog Introduction In this chapter I want to describe the ‘Nordic model’ of national machinery for gender equality. I want to show the similarities between the countries, but also the differences. The official Nordic cooperation on gender equality, conducted by the Nordic Council of Ministers, is based on the development of pilot projects and reports on priority areas. It provides excellent opportunities to develop new methods and strategies and is a forum

in Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?
Open Access (free)
Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action 1
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

Introduction Despite increasing attention to gender issues in the humanitarian sector, the notion of gender equality as a humanitarian goal remains largely rejected. Some humanitarians argue that transforming gender relations goes against the humanitarian principles (see Fal-Dutra Santos, 2019 for a critique of this position). This is only part of the argument, which also emphasises the cultural nature of gender norms and the duty to respect

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Abstract only
Surveying Gender in Pat Barker‘s Fiction
Sarah Gamble

This article examines Pat Barker‘s novel Another World (1998) in order to argue that it portrays the masculine subject as precarious and unstable. This is linked to the novels regional setting, in which traditional ‘heavy’ industries such as armaments manufacturing are in decline, thus depriving men of an authoritative public and private role. Viewed from the perspective of postfeminism, this might be regarded as a sign that male (and female) roles can be renegotiated in order to achieve greater gender equality. However, Barker‘s frequent references to Gothic texts renders this crisis sinister and uncanny. This paper uses references to Nicolas Abraham‘s essay ‘Notes on the Phantom’ in order to assert that Another World‘s preoccupation with murder and haunting reveals a compulsive desire to cover up this sense of ‘lack’ that Barker implies characterises modern masculine subjectivity.

Gothic Studies
Open Access (free)
Cora Kaplan

The distinguished critic Professor Cheryl A. Wall (1948–2020) was the Board of Governors Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. Her path-breaking scholarship in two highly influential monographs, Women of the Harlem Renaissance (1995) and Worrying the Line: Black Women Writers, Lineage, and Literary Tradition (2005), helped to ensure that twentieth-century Black women writers were recognized and valued for their power, genius, and complexity. Her most recent book, On Freedom and the Will to Adorn: The Art of the African American Essay (2018), places the essay form at the center of African American literary achievement. Throughout her long career she supported and enabled Black students, and championed racial diversity and gender equality at every level of the university. An Associate Editor of James Baldwin Review, she was the most generous and astute of readers, as well as a wise editor. In this memorial section, fifteen colleagues, former students, and interlocutors share their remembrances and honor her legacy.

James Baldwin Review
Insight from Northeast Nigeria
Chikezirim C. Nwoke
,
Jennifer Becker
,
Sofiya Popovych
,
Mathew Gabriel
, and
Logan Cochrane

Humanitarian Affairs (UN OCHA) advocates rigorous gender-based analyses to inform intervention programmes ( UN OCHA, 2021 ). Key humanitarian and development donors have also placed an emphasis on gender equality when evaluating funding decisions. The OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC), for example, encourages its members to track and report gender equality results achieved by projects in order to ensure that they do not reproduce or exacerbate gender inequalities ( OECD, 2016 ). While most OECD donors stay to the minimum, governments such as Canada, Iceland

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Corporations, Celebrities and the Construction of the Entrepreneurial Refugee Woman
Annika Bergman Rosamond
and
Catia Gregoratti

Introduction The promotion of female entrepreneurship in the global South has animated a great deal of feminist research on the World Bank, public-private partnerships and celebrity-endorsed initiatives. Hingeing on a ‘business case for gender equality’, it recasts the ‘Third World Woman’ ( Mohanty, 1984 ) as agentic and endlessly enterprising ( Wilson, 2011 ; Altan-Olcay, 2016 ; Roberts and Zulfiqar, 2019 ). Recent scholarship, however

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Gender Norm Change during Displacement?
Michelle Lokot

Introduction With the increased focus on gender across the humanitarian sector, gender analysis has become more important to humanitarian actors, including international non-governmental organisations (NGOs), United Nations agencies and local NGOs. Promoting ‘gender equality and women’s empowerment’ often motivates humanitarian actors, however there is no consensus on what this concept means or how it is measured ( Cornwall and Rivas

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Róisín Read

showcase the potential for important research to emerge when academics and practitioners collaborate meaningfully. The feminist ethos at the heart of these collaborations showcases what more explicitly feminist approaches to humanitarian research and practice can offer. Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos tackles this question explicitly, offering a thoughtful and insightful commentary on the compatibility of feminism and humanitarian principles. He questions the idea that gender equality as a goal runs counter

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Dispelling Misconceptions about Sexual Violence against Men and Boys in Conflict and Displacement
Heleen Touquet
,
Sarah Chynoweth
,
Sarah Martin
,
Chen Reis
,
Henri Myrttinen
,
Philipp Schulz
,
Lewis Turner
, and
David Duriesmith

gender equality. In this paper, we clarify ten common misconceptions about conflict and displacement-related sexual violence against men and boys based on existing evidence and our collective field experience in twenty-seven countries as humanitarian aid workers and academics. The ten misconceptions relate to the nature and scope of sexual violence against men and boys, its gendered impact on survivors, and the development of effective humanitarian responses to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs