Film and television

Previous studies of screen performance have tended to fix upon star actors, directors, or programme makers, or they have concentrated upon particular training and acting styles. Moving outside of these confines, this book provides an interdisciplinary account of performance in film and television and examines a much neglected area in people's understanding of how popular genres and performance intersect on screen. The advent of star studies certainly challenged the traditional notion of the director as the single or most important creative force in a film. Genre theory emerged as an academic area in the 1960s and 1970s, partly as a reaction to the auteurism of the period and partly as a way of addressing popular cinematic forms. Television studies have also developed catalogues of genres, some specific to the medium and some that refer to familiar cinematic genres. The book describes certain acting patterns in the classic noirs Maltese Falcon, The Big Sleep, Out of the Past and the neo-noirs Chinatown. British television drama in the 1970s had a special interest in the genre of horror. There is no film genre to which performance is as crucial as it is to the biopic. To explore comedy performance is to acknowledge that there is something that defines a performance as 'comic'. The book also examines drama-documentary, the western, science fiction, comedy performance in 'spoof news' programmes and the television 'sit com' and popular Bollywood films.

This collection of essays explores tragedy, the most versatile of Renaissance literary genres, revealing its astonishing thematic, stylistic and emotional range. Each chapter consists of a case study, offering not only a definition of a particular kind of Renaissance tragedy but also new research into an important example of that genre. There is only one chapter on Shakespeare; instead contributors attend to subgenres of tragedy – biblical tragedy and closet drama, for example – in which Shakespeare did not engage and others in which the nature of his influence is interrogated, producing original critical readings of individual plays which show how interventions in these subgenres can be mapped onto debates surrounding numerous important issues, including national identity, the nature of divine authority, early modern youth culture, gender and ethics, as well as questions relating to sovereignty and political intervention. The chapters also highlight the rich range of styles adopted by the early modern tragic dramatists and show how opportunely the genre as a whole is positioned for speaking truth to power. Collectively, these essays reassess the various sub-genres of Renaissance tragedy in ways which respond to the radical changes that have affected the critical landscape over the last few decades.

A generation ago, Spain was emerging from a nearly forty-year dictatorship. This book analyses the significant changes in the aesthetics, production and reception of Spanish cinema and genre from 1990 to the present. It brings together European and North American scholars to establish a critical dialogue on the topic of contemporary Spanish cinema and genre while providing multiple perspectives on the concepts of national cinemas and genre theory. The book addresses a particular production unit, the Barcelona-based Fantastic Factory as part of the increasingly important Filmax group of companies, with the explicit aim of making genre films that would have an appeal beyond the Spanish market. It explores the genrification of the Almodovar brand in the US media and cinematic imaginary as a point of departure to tackle how the concepts of genre, authorship and Spanish cinema itself acquire different meanings when transposed into a foreign film market. Melodrama and political thriller films have been a narrative and representational form tied to the imagining of the nation. The book also examines some of the aspects of Carícies that distinguish it from Pons's other entries in his Minimalist Trilogy. It looks briefly at the ways in which the letter acts as one of the central melodramatic gestures in Isabel Coixet's films. After an analysis of the Spanish musical from the 1990s until today, the book discusses Spanish immigration films and some Spanish-Cuban co-productions on tourism and transnational romance.

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Brian McFarlane and Deane Williams

in it’. 1 In Michael Winterbottom’s case, either he has never been given that advice or he has ignored it. The diversity of his output raises the issue of genre in British filmmaking in unusually vivid terms. He has made literary adaptations strikingly at odds with the prevailing British mode of dealing with classic authors; there is in some of his work a strong sense of the documentary influence at work, when he has been

in Michael Winterbottom
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Le Salaire de la peur
Christopher Lloyd

4 Beyond genre: Le Salaire de la peur Following Rick Altman’s argument (1999: 20) that genre is not merely ‘a hollow commercial formula’ but ‘a culturally functional category’, the main purpose of this discussion is to study Henri-Georges Clouzot’s Le Salaire de la peur and ‘the particular ratio it exhibits between convention and invention, between the requirements of genre and the ingenuity and world view of an auteur working with that genre’ (Andrew 1984: 116). Although there may be some initial hesitation about what genre Le Salaire belongs to (for example

in Henri-Georges Clouzot
Christine Cornea

television screen. For me, coordinating a new edited collection around either individual directors or performers comes too close to re-establishing the romantic idea of the author or auteur as sole creator of meaning in film or television. Therefore, as the title of this book suggests, I asked my contributors to concentrate specifically upon performance in conjunction with the concept of genre. It has always

in Genre and performance
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Genre and performance in Shahrukh Khan’s post-millennial films
Rayna Denison

Film genres are always already mixed; as the process of making films requires ever new combinations of generic elements ( Altman, 1999 : 54-68). Despite this, there are very few discussions of the effects of genre mixing and hybridisation, even in relation to Hollywood cinema. A blind spot in genre criticism has therefore emerged and the effects of genre mixing on the whole of the circuit of culture

in Genre and performance
Roberta Pearson

production under which all the creative personnel labour. This chapter explores the multiple determinants of the televison actors’ agency and creativity: time; the actor’s status within the cast; the visual nature of the medium; input from other creative personnel and, last and most importantly in terms of this volume, the genre. The science fiction genre poses unique challenges for actors, as will become apparent. And what better

in Genre and performance
Christine Cornea

positive reports of both Titan A. E. and Final Fantasy by critics and academics alike. The difference in critical estimation of the cartoon-style comedies and science fiction animations, I would suggest, has much to do with the divergent modes of address and performance styles associated with the two genres. Certainly, Titan A. E. and Final Fantasy also featured star voices, although these tended to belong to actors new to

in Genre and performance
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Horror acting in the 1970s British television drama
Richard J. Hand

British television drama in the 1970s had a special interest in the genre of horror. Examples of horror television included works with a supernatural theme, such as the BBC’s A Ghost Story for Christmas series (1971-78), most familiarly featuring adaptations of the short stories of M. R. James, but also works by Nigel Kneale for both the BBC (The Stone Tape [1972]) and ITV (Beasts [1976]). Of

in Genre and performance