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Coloniality, race, and Islam
Editors: and

The so-called ‘War on Terror’ ushered in a new era of anti-Muslim bias and racism. Anti-Muslim racism, or Islamophobia, is influenced by local economies, power structures, and histories. However, the War on Terror, a conflict undefined by time and place, with a homogenised Muslim ‘Other’ framed as a perpetual enemy, has contributed towards a global Islamophobic narrative. This edited volume examines the differing manifestations of Islamophobia, as well as resistance and activism combating it across multiple international settings, spanning six continents. The volume maps out categories of Islamophobia across the global North and South.These are the localised histories, conflicts, and contemporary geopolitical realities in the context of the War on Terror which have influenced and textured the ways that Islamophobia has manifested. This ranges from limited instances of racial violence and hate crimes to more pronounced co-dependent relations between interpersonal and institutional racism that have culminated in genocide. This book presents a nuanced appreciation of specific themes that critically engage with the complexity and evolution of Islamophobia in the War on Terror. It provides up-to-date accounts and analysis of Islamophobia across the global North and South and its impact on the political landscape of differing country contexts. Furthermore, this book explores resistance and the need for activism that confronts interpersonal and institutional racism, with the aim of constructing a more coherent understanding of how to challenge Islamophobia.

Open Access (free)
The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author:

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

Abstract only
Naved Bakali
and
Farid Hafez

phenomenon. This simple, yet substantial claim is the basis for this edited volume. The new frontiers of Islamophobia The so-called ‘War on Terror’ ushered in a new era of anti-Muslim bias and racism globally. Islamophobia is textured and influenced by local economies, power structures, and histories. However, the War on Terror, a conflict undefined by time and place, with a homogenised Muslim ‘Other’ framed as a perpetual enemy, has reinforced Islamophobia on a global scale, creating transnational sites of struggle

in The rise of global Islamophobia in the War on Terror
Open Access (free)
The failure of history
Neil Macmaster

‘uncivilised’ order that was based on the subjugation of women, despotism, polygamy, the harem and sexual perversion. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954–62, in its emphasis on un-veiling and the drive to a western style emancipation, derived its force from this Orientalist current in European colonialism, but also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to ‘liberate’ Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. The seismic shift of 9/11 has tended to obscure the fact that the roots

in Burning the veil
Farhan Mujahid Chak

Hindu fold (Mishra 2014 ). The ways and means of its propagation are bordering on encouraging rape and abduction of Muslim and other minority women. It is despicable, and occurring in the so-called largest democracy in the world, with little if any social resistance and criticism. The depth of global Islamophobia intersects with Islamophobia in India to create a veil of silence over the atrocities that are being committed every day. Anywhere else in the so-called civilised world, promotion of a campaign which encourages one religious community to forcibly wed women

in The rise of global Islamophobia in the War on Terror
The vicious cycle of institutionalised racism and reinforcing the Muslim ‘Other’
Tahir Abbas

): 123–38 . Mandeville , P. ( 2009 ). Muslim transnational identity and state responses in Europe and the UK after 9/11: political community, ideology and authority , Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies , 35 ( 3 ): 491–506 . Morgan , G. and Poynting , S. (eds) ( 2016 ). Global Islamophobia: Muslims and moral panic in the

in The rise of global Islamophobia in the War on Terror
Abstract only
Women and the narrative of extremist violence in Pakistan
Afiya Shehrbano Zia

years after 2001 as it now included post-secular scholars and conservative commentators as defenders of Islamists. This narrative technique was most manifest in the case of Afia Siddiqui, the US-based Pakistani female scientist who was put on the FBI wanted list in 2005 and extradited from Pakistan by General Musharraf to the US, where she was tried, incarcerated and sentenced for suspected terrorism in 2010. The right-wing Islamists, especially the Jamaat e Islami , used her as an icon of global Islamophobia, US injustices and Muslim victimhood in national

in Encountering extremism
Racialising the Muslim subject in public, media, and political discourse in the War on Terror era
Derya Iner
and
Sean McManus

. Poynting (eds), Global Islamophobia: Muslims and moral panic in the West, Farnham : Ashgate , 1–14 . Murphy , K. ( 2014 ). The acid test: Australian journalists must ask what agenda they serve , The Guardian , 26 September, www.theguardian.com/world/2014/sep/26/the-acid-test-australian-journalists-must-ask-what-agenda-they-serve (accessed 11 June 2021

in The rise of global Islamophobia in the War on Terror
Todd H. Green

Journal , 6 ( 1 ): 79–92 . Huus , K. and Curry , T. ( 2006 ). The day the enemy became ‘Islamic fascists’ , NBC News , 5 August, www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna14304397 (accessed 27 June 2021). Iftikhar , A. ( 2021 ). Fear of a Muslim planet: global Islamophobia in the new world order

in The rise of global Islamophobia in the War on Terror
Nicky Falkof

global Islamophobia, part of what Gabeba Baderoon calls the ‘South African experience of a local Orientalist tradition’ ( 2015 , p. 109). Earlier that week, in a ‘show of anger over the [plasma gang] murders’, a shop belonging to two Pakistani men had been burnt down, tyres had been set alight and rocks thrown down Alfred Nzo, one of the main streets running through Alex. These stereotypes also emerged in my interviews. According to Siphokazi, the plasma gangs were comprised of ‘a set of people from outside … Foreign people

in Worrier state