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Editor: Glennis Byron

The late twentieth century saw growing number of articles and books appearing on new national gothic; however, the wider context for this had not really been addressed. This collection of essays explores an emerging globalgothic useful for all students and academics interested in the gothic, in international literature, cinema, and cyberspace, presenting examples of globalgothic in the 21st-century forms. It analyses a global dance practice first performed in Japan, Ankoku butoh, and surveys the ways in which Indigenous cultures have been appropriated for gothic screen fictions. To do this, it looks at the New Zealand television series on Maori mythologies, Mataku. The unlocated 'vagabonds' of Michel Faber's "The Fahrenheit Twins" are doubles (twins) of a gothic trajectory as well as globalgothic figures of environmental change. The book considers the degree to which the online vampire communities reveal cultural homogenisation and the imposition of Western forms. Global culture has created a signature phantasmagoric spatial experience which is uncanny. Funny Games U.S. (2008) reproduces this process on the material level of production, distribution and reception. The difference between the supposedly 'primitive' local associated with China and a progressive global city associated with Hong Kong is brought out through an analysis of cannibal culture. In contemporary Thai horror films, the figure of horror produced is neither local nor global but simultaneously both. The book also traces the development, rise and decline of American gothic, and looks at one of the central gothic figures of the twenty-first century: the zombie.

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Unburying Japanese figurality
Charles Shirō Inouye

less horrifying and more repentant, ushering in a postmodern age of monstrous expression that fits our usual understanding of the (modern) gothic only occasionally. Today, as a dominant source of globalised popular culture, Japan’s contributions to the globalgothic force us to rethink the definition of the gothic. To be sure, even in the West, Dracula’s coat has become tight in places. In Japan the fit

in Globalgothic
Fred Botting and Justin D. Edwards

anxiety of a globalised system that erupts within or from public cultures across the world. Globalisation, then, has led to a new way of thinking about gothic production: globalgothic. But what is globalgothic? And how might it be theorised? One starting point for addressing these questions is to acknowledge that, despite huge variations in cultural-historical factors, spatial and temporal modes and the

in Globalgothic
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Glennis Byron

of this book, ‘Theorising globalgothic’, in which Fred Botting and Justin D. Edwards situate what we are calling the globalgothic within some of the existing theoretical paradigms of globalisation. While globalisation discourse may call upon familiar gothic tropes, globalisation is nevertheless transforming and defamiliarising these tropes as the increased mobility and fluidity of culture leads to

in Globalgothic
American gothic to globalgothic
James Campbell

of American gothic and the overlapping transition to a globalgothic in which America is but a part leads me to discuss two canonical, antebellum-era American gothic texts, and one contemporary instance with close ties to these, concluding with a final example of a globalgothic ‘America’ made in Japan. Each suggests the American nation state to be built atop unstable foundations, as representatives of

in Globalgothic
Locating the globalgothic
Justin D. Edwards

. Yet we must also recognise that gothic tropes are not always static, fixed in one particular site, but travel across the globe in the movements of people and the global flows of cultural production disseminated widely in film, television, visual culture, new media. In this the globalgothic is not just about representations of the borders separating life and death, real and unreal, self and other; it is also

in Globalgothic
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Fear, the law and liquid modernity
Avril Horner

There are two ways of thinking about globalgothic. The first is to recognise that many different cultures across the world have experienced and continue to share a sense of the uncanny and/or the supernatural which is expressed through multiple forms, including music, art, literature, film and dance. Thus certain tropes (for example, ghosts; sacred space; malfunctioning space

in Globalgothic
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Colette Balmain

thinking about the gothic in an age of globalisation and cosmopolitanism: one which is best expressed by the term globalgothic. The films discussed in this chapter are the award-winning portmanteau Kwaidan ( Kaidan , Masaki Kobayashi, Japan: 1964 ) and A Tale of Two Sisters ( Janghwa Hongryeon , Kim Jee-woon, South Korea: 2003 ), two films that exemplify the merging of the global with the

in Globalgothic
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The dance of global darkness
Steven Bruhm

been considered together. 1 I take as a working premise that at least some aspects of the contemporary gothic aesthetic owe as much to butoh as butoh owes to an earlier Western dance practice, which itself owes much to the gothic tradition in literature, music and visual art. In so juxtaposing these expressive worlds, I want to use butoh to raise some questions about the notion of a ‘globalgothic

in Globalgothic
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Globalising the supernatural in contemporary Thai horror film
Katarzyna Ancuta

interactions and exchange’ that Jonathan Xavier Inda and Renato Rosaldo note are entailed in current definitions of globalisation ( 2008 : 4). But does this mean that we can stipulate the existence of a separate category of globalgothic horror and, if so, what would be the potential consequences? The case of Thai horror cinema is a good starting point for discussion, since both ‘gothic’ and ‘horror’ are

in Globalgothic