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Community engagement and lifelong learning
Author: Peter Mayo

In this broad sweep, Mayo explores dominant European discourses of higher education, in the contexts of different globalisations and neoliberalism, and examines its extension to a specific region. It explores alternatives in thinking and practice including those at the grassroots, also providing a situationally grounded project of university–community engagement. Signposts for further directions for higher education lifelong learning, with a social justice purpose, are provided.

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Rosemary Deem

education for the public good actually mean (McCowan and Deem, 2018)? Is the distinction between higher education as a public good and higher education for the public good a useful one (Locatelli, 2017)? Does it mean the same thing in the global north and global south (Leibowitz, 2012)? Is it just related to the debate 119 120 Higher education in a globalising WORLD about the costs of higher education and who should pay them? Can public good be taught or is it just another form of commodification (Deem, 2018; Marginson, 2007)? Who assesses whether members of the public

in Higher education in a globalising world
Peter Mayo

J. Cropley (1980) come to mind, together with the authors of the Faure Report (Faure et  al., 1972) mentioned earlier. Some of these writings had their basis in scientific humanism (Wain, 2004, pp. 16–​19), a philosophical outlook that foregrounds human rather than religious values. UNESCO’s first director-​general, 17 18 Higher education in a globalising WORLD Julian Huxley was associated with scientific humanism (see Finger and Asún, 2001, p. 22). At the risk of generalising from among the work of a diverse group of writers, one can say that this movement

in Higher education in a globalising world
Peter Mayo

, including countries such as Turkey, be allowed to develop their own institutions on their own terms and in synch with the specificities of their own cultures, geographical location and social and economic needs? This would be the challenge for any cooperation in this regard where countries from different sides of the region, EU members or not, are allowed to participate in a process of exchange and policy ‘reinvention’ on their own terms. 45 46 Higher education in a globalising WORLD I would argue that simply extending the dominant EU discourse across the Mediterranean

in Higher education in a globalising world
Peter Mayo

, Manchester Metropolitan University and Salford University) offering a joint online Master’s in sociology. This was short-​lived. Was it less attractive than courses in human resource development (HRD) and business management? Alternatively, is the effort involved in writing courses for online provision and conducting them more difficult than one anticipates, especially given the nature 109 110 Higher education in a globalising WORLD of economic returns involved? I  have heard people involved in these projects, often aborted after a short while, mention the existence of

in Higher education in a globalising world
Peter Mayo

education in a globalising WORLD borrowing from Carl Boggs, the ‘prefigurative’ nature of much of this work (i.e., embodying those practices that constitute the ultimate, long-​term vision of a future university or HE institution). The third part will consist of a series of considerations around alternative discourses in HE LLL with references to past and present. Many of these attempts point to alternative discourses to the generally accepted hegemonic one of a market-​oriented and neoliberal LLL approach in HE. This alternative discourse affirms HE as a public good and

in Higher education in a globalising world
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Globalisation and the HE market
Peter Mayo

, while ‘globalisation does represent a new set of rules, there is no reason to expect all countries to interpret those rules in identical ways, or expect them all to play to the rules in identical ways’ (p. 65). Hegemonic globalisation There are different kinds of globalisation. According to Carlos Alberto Torres (2005; Rhoads and Torres, 2005a, pp. 8–​9) there are: (1) hegemonic globalisation; (2) globalisation from below; (3) globalisation of exchange of people and ideas, 1 2 Higher education in a globalising WORLD and influence on culture;1 (4) globalisation of

in Higher education in a globalising world
Peter Mayo

), quality assurance (EC, 2006c), innovation and creativity (CEC, 2008), governance (Education and Culture DG, 2008) and HE university–​business cooperation (EC, 2008), among others. 27 28 Higher education in a globalising WORLD A number of keywords emerge from these and other related documents, as well as documents by agencies that dwell on the implications of these policy directions, such as the Council for Industry and Higher Education (Brown, 2007) and the League of European Research Universities (LERU, 2006). The keywords include ‘knowledge economy

in Higher education in a globalising world
Peter Mayo

‘Holy Week’ project had to be addressed: how does one build educationally on what really ‘gets the communities 95 96 Higher education in a globalising WORLD going’? What is the ‘occasional motive’, to echo, once again, Italian critical educator Lorenzo Milani (Martinelli, 2007), and how do we move beyond this to explore, together, a broad range of knowledges (plural intended)? Festas, communities and political education Festas or fiestas are an important feature of outdoor communities in many parts of the Mediterranean as witnessed in several parts of Spain, Italy

in Higher education in a globalising world
Peter Mayo

boot, including the Popular Education Network (Crowther, 2013) initiated by academic-​activists such as Mae Shaw, Ian Martin, Jim Crowther and Vernon Galloway –​at Moray House School of Education, University of Edinburgh (the initial conference was held at the 75 76 Higher education in a globalising WORLD University of Edinburgh in 2000), PASCAL (http://​pascalobservatory.org/​) and the Talloires Network. The last-​mentioned network arose from a 2005 meeting at the Tufts University European Centre in Talloires, France, which brought together 29 university

in Higher education in a globalising world