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Globalising kosher and halal markets
Authors: John Lever and Johan Fischer

Over the last two decades, global demand for kosher products has been growing steadily, and many non-religious consumers view kosher as a healthy food option: in the US over 60 per cent of kosher food consumption is linked to non-religious values associated with health and food quality. This book explores the emergence and expansion of global kosher and halal markets with a particular focus on the UK and Denmark. While Kosher is a Hebrew term meaning 'fit' or 'proper', halal is an Arabic word that literally means 'permissible' or 'lawful'. The book discusses the manufacture and production of kosher and halal meat (both red meat and poultry) with specific reference to audits/inspections, legislation, networking, product innovation and certification. It draws on contemporary empirical material to explore kosher and halal comparatively at different levels of the social scale, such as individual consumption, the marketplace, religious organisations and the state. It compares the major markets for kosher/halal in the UK with those in Denmark, where kosher/halal are important to smaller groups of religious consumers. Denmark plays an important role in biotechnology that is compatible with what we call kosher/halal transnational governmentality. The book explores how Jewish and Muslim consumers in the UK and Denmark understand and practice kosher consumption in their everyday lives. It also explores how 'compound practice' links eating with issues such as health and spirituality, for example, and with the influence of secularism and ritual.

Roberta Lammers

Loyola University of Chicago is a Jesuit institution of higher education whose main campus is located in a crowded urban setting. The university has organized a satellite campus for both undergraduate and graduate students that focuses on restoration of the environmentally sensitive wetlands that surround the property as well as supporting life off the grid with organic farming practices supporting a healthy food system. This takes place in a context of moral and ethical focus, unusual in most universities. This chapter highlights the challenges of listening to community and establishing relationships as they integrate sustainable practices in an innovative and unconventional curriculum.

in University engagement and environmental sustainability
Peter Triantafillou and Naja Vucina

per cent of men and 52 per cent of women were either overweight or obese. As part of its general health promotion strategy, New Labour argued in favour of ‘integrated action’ that would address people at all ages and, more importantly, the 65 Fighting obesity in England     65 various social, economic, and environmental conditions that impinge on individual behaviour (Secretary of State for Health, 1999a, p.  53). This included employment, poverty, access to retailers of healthy food, and building social capital and cohesive communities. Apart from systematic

in The politics of health promotion
Sandra Streed

to having access to healthy food, many consumers want to know where their food comes from, how it was grown, and who grew it. They want to know about the entire food chain. This awareness and demand for information is creating a vibrant, resilient, creative market for sustainable foods and prompting demands for changes in agricultural policies and regulations. Leading civic and business organizations have commissioned studies and committed resources, leading to the inclusion of local food systems in local and regional planning efforts. In 2007, the American

in University engagement and environmental sustainability
Analysing the linkages and exploring possibilities for improving health and wellbeing
Warren Smit

(McKinnnon et al., 2009). Various tools, such as the Food Environment Classification Tool (Lake et al., 2010 ), and measurement indices, such as the Retail Food Environment Index (Spence et al., 2009 ), have been developed. The Retail Food Environment Index is a simple measure of food environments (the number of fast-food outlets divided by the number of supermarkets and grocery stores), based on the questionable assumption that supermarkets and grocery stores always sell healthier food than convenience stores and fast-food outlets. Glanz et al. ( 2007 ) distinguish

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Bodies and environments in Italy and England

This book explores whether early modern people cared about their health, and what did it mean to lead a healthy life in Italy and England. According to the Galenic-Hippocratic tradition, 'preservative' medicine was one of the three central pillars of the physician's art. Through a range of textual evidence, images and material artefacts, the book documents the profound impact which ideas about healthy living had on daily practices as well as on intellectual life and the material world in Italy and England. Staying healthy and health conservation was understood as depending on the careful management of the six 'Non-Naturals': the air one breathed, food and drink, excretions, sleep, exercise and repose, and the 'passions of the soul'. The book provides fresh evidence about the centrality of the Non-Naturals in relation to groups whose health has not yet been investigated in works about prevention: babies, women and convalescents. Pregnancy constituted a frequent physical state for many women of the early modern European aristocracy. The emphasis on motion and rest, cleansing the body, and improving the mental and spiritual states made a difference for the aristocratic woman's success in the trade of frequent pregnancy and childbirth. Preventive advice was not undifferentiated, nor simply articulated by individual complexion. Examining the roles of the Non-Naturals, the book provides a more holistic view of convalescent care. It also deals with the paradoxical nature of perceptions about the Neapolitan environment and the way in which its airs were seen to affect human bodies and health.

Abstract only
Darlene E. Clover

urban setting. The university has organized a satellite campus for both undergraduate and graduate students that focuses on restoration of the environmentally sensitive wetlands that surround the property as well as supporting life off the grid with organic farming practices supporting a healthy food system. This takes place in a context of moral and ethical focus, unusual in most universities. Chapter 11 highlights the challenges of listening to community and establishing relationships as they integrate sustainable practices in an innovative and unconventional

in University engagement and environmental sustainability
Barrie Gunter

were observed that were associated with the type of advergame they played. Those children that played the advergames for healthy foods consumed 50% more carrots and grapes than did children who played the advergames representing unhealthy foods. Children who played advergames not connected to food products fell in between the other two groups in terms of the amount of healthy food they consumed. Children who consumed the greatest amount of snack food ­classified as ‘unhealthy’ were those who played advergames for foods of this type. Harris and her colleagues

in Kids and branding in a digital world
Re-inventing open space in Greece and Switzerland
Sofia Nikolaidou

’s revived notion of the ‘right to the city’) without locational discrimination and distributional inequalities (Soja, 2009). Discussion about food justice is also centred around access to healthy food and food resource distribution by focusing on the right to food as a component of a more democratic and just society (Wekerle, 2004). Apart from the social and distributive aspects of justice that focus on the (re-​)distribution of resources, the notion of spatial justice has a procedural dimension that is closely related to democratisation through inclusiveness and

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
Concepts and practice
Lucy Rose Wright and Ross Fraser Young

the remaining plots were not privatised. Concurrently the National Health Service (State-​owned) needed land to promote a ‘five a day –​ fruit and vegetables’ initiative. It perceived a need to increase healthy food consumption, access and education. The NHS gained access to two acres of unused land. Volunteers and residents –​helped by the State –​planted trees. Subsequently, the NHS lacked financial resources and withdrew support. Julie describes flux as ‘sink or swim’ (Julie, interview, 2016). The State recommitted until the group ‘became self-​sufficient’ (Julie

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice