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Alexandra Kelso

2 Historical institutionalism and parliament Introduction To understand why parliamentary reform does or does not take place requires a prior understanding of the context in which it does or does not occur. The characteristics of the institution of parliament are a product of its historical development, and that development has fostered the emergence of particular norms and values that continue to shape its functioning and capabilities. Crucially, parliament cannot be understood in isolation from government and, consequently, parliamentary reform cannot be

in Parliamentary reform at Westminster
The politics of coherence and effectiveness
Author: Ana E. Juncos

This book represents the first ever comprehensive study of the EU’s foreign and security policy in Bosnia since the dissolution of the Yugoslav Federation in 1991. Drawing on historical institutionalism, it explains the EU’s contribution to post-conflict stabilisation and conflict resolution in Bosnia. The book demonstrates that institutions are a key variable in explaining levels of coherence and effectiveness of the EU’s Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) and that institutional legacies and unintended consequences have shaped CFSP impact over time. In doing so, it also sheds new light on the role that intergovernmental, bureaucratic and local political contestation have played in the formulation and implementation of a European foreign and security policy. The study concludes that the EU’s involvement in Bosnia has not only had a significant impact on this Balkan country in its path from stabilisation to integration, but has also transformed the EU, its foreign and security policy and shaped the development of the EU’s international identity along the way.

Analytical challenges
Simon Bulmer and Martin Burch

change in British central government. Historical institutionalism is particularly suited to examining the temporal dimension of adaptation that forms the basis of our study. In Chapter 8 we take our analytical apparatus further and suggest a framework for explaining change. Europeanisation: adapting to integration The literature on Europeanisation has been growing in recent times and has included detailed consideration of how to define the concept as well as the specification of research designs for exploring its empirical features (Börzel 1999; Radaelli 2000; Knill

in The Europeanisation of Whitehall
Abstract only
Simon Bulmer and Martin Burch

’s adaptation to the EU – both across Whitehall and more specifically within individual departments. Our examination of change has been facilitated by the development of tools of analysis derived from two approaches: Europeanisation and historical institutionalism. In particular we have drawn on historical institutionalism as a way of isolating key moments of change and of judging the pattern, degree and extent of adaptation by UK central government. We have used Europeanisation to help us understand the factors driving these changes and the extent to which EU influences can

in The Europeanisation of Whitehall
Siegfried Schieder

and institutions has long been regarded as either determined by actors (RI) or institutional structures (SI). Scholars of historical institutionalism (HI) who take temporality seriously assume a mediating position between RI and SI (Hall and Taylor 1996 : 938; Steinmo 2008 : 113). According to Pierson ( 1996 : 126), HI is “ historical because it recognizes that political development must be understood as a process that unfolds over time. It is institutionalist because it stresses that many of the contemporary implications of these temporary processes are

in Foreign policy as public policy?
Simon Bulmer and Martin Burch

9780719055157_4_008.qxd 20/3/09 12:05 PM Page 184 8 Understanding the impact of Europe This chapter returns to our concern with Europeanisation as manifested through a historical institutionalist analysis. In the first section of the chapter we use historical institutionalism as a way of taking stock of developments. We concentrate on the lessons to be drawn from the preceding four empirical chapters. The nature and dimensions of the changes that have taken place are examined and we isolate any critical moments and consider which of these might be defined as

in The Europeanisation of Whitehall
Abstract only
Eunice Goes

on discursive and historical institutionalisms. Both ‘new instutionalisms’ emphasise the role of ideas in politics but they place different emphasis on their importance. Whereas discursive institutionalists see ideas as agents and stress their transformative role, historical institutionalists emphasise the role of structures as facilitators or as constraints to their success. Discursive institutionalists also see institutions as simultaneously Introduction 5 ‘constraining structures and enabling constructs of meaning’14 but they pay far less attention to those

in The Labour Party under Ed Miliband
Michael Mulqueen

leading scholars suggested that Irish policy managers in the frontline agencies were subject to continuous financial and political pressures. This was so even at moments of perceived crisis for the security of the State. The major consideration here is whether the ways that the agencies have learned to deal with these pressures contribute to policy weaknesses after 9/11. Historical institutionalism is used

in Re-evaluating Irish national security policy
Alexandra Kelso

9 Understanding parliamentary reform Parliamentary reform in perspective There have been several different arguments pursued in this book, but one in particular has served to link all the others together, which is that institutions are characterised both by persistence and by change, and we must have devices in our conceptual toolkit that are capable of analysing, and perhaps even explaining, both. Historical institutionalism has been used here because it not only forces us to take the long-term view of an institution’s development, but also gives us insights

in Parliamentary reform at Westminster
Alexandra Kelso

basis of the second chamber, and to deal with the question of the unelected membership, it was always the issue of democratic legitimacy that impeded them.Those who were against comprehensive changes to the composition of the House of Lords argued that any kind of democratic election for the second chamber would bestow legitimacy on it, and thus enable it to challenge the will of the Commons: such arguments were heard repeatedly in the reform ‘episodes’ of 1968–69 and again in 2002–3, the second of which is covered in the next chapter. Historical institutionalism

in Parliamentary reform at Westminster