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Middle-Aged Syrian Women’s Contributions to Family Livelihoods during Protracted Displacement in Jordan
Dina Sidhva, Ann-Christin Zuntz, Ruba al Akash, Ayat Nashwan, and Areej Al-Majali

.unicef.org/mena/media/5451/file/Regional%20Accountability%20Framework%20of%20Action%20on%20Ending%20Child%20Marriage.pdf (accessed 11 October 2020 ). Van Raemdonck , A. ( 2021 ), ‘ A Desire for Normality: (Early) Marriage among Syrian Refugees in Jordan between Waiting and Home-Making ’, Social Anthropology , 29 : 1

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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A blended ethnography of a migrant city

Based on several years of ethnographic fieldwork, French London provides rare insights into the everyday lived experience of a diverse group of French citizens who have chosen to make London home. From sixth-form students to an octogenarian divorcee, hospitality to hospital staff, and second-generation onward migrants to returnees, the individual trajectories described are disparate but connected by a ‘common-unity’ of practice. Despite most not self-identifying with a ‘community’ identity, this heterogenous migrant group are shown to share many homemaking characteristics and to enact their belonging in common ways. Whether through the contents of their kitchens, their reasons for migrating to London or their evolving attitudes to education and healthcare, participants are seen to embody a distinct form of London-Frenchness. Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu’s theories of ‘symbolic violence’ and ‘habitus’, inventively deconstructed into its component parts of habitat, habituation and habits, the book reveals how structural forces in France and early encounters with ‘otherness’ underpin mobility, and how long-term settlement is performed as a pre-reflexive process. It deploys an original blended ethnographic lens to understand the intersection between the on-land and online in contemporary mobility, providing a rich description of migrants’ material and digital habitats. With ‘Brexit’ on the horizon and participants subsequently revisited in a post-referendum Epilogue, the monograph demonstrates the appeal of London prior to 2016 and the disruption to the migrants’ identity and belonging since. It offers an unprecedented window onto the intimate lifeworlds of an under-researched diaspora at a crucial point in Britain’s history.

The temporality of dwelling for displaced Georgians
Cathrine Brun and Ragne Øwre Thorshaug

’ dormitories, kindergartens, schools, sanatoria, hospitals, factories, or storage spaces. In protracted displacement, the residents of these shelters and collective centers gradually appropriate the buildings into becoming long-term residences because there is no available solution in sight. The buildings may not be considered home at the outset, but the gradual appropriation of buildings such as Salome's represents homemaking practices that do not necessarily lead to a solution and an end to displacement (Brun, 2012 ). In the current discourse around

in Displacement
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Michaela Benson

5 At home in the Lot This chapter explores how my respondents made their houses in the Lot into homes. Through the examination of specific case studies I reveal the process of home-making, from planning, building and modification of the material form of houses to choices over how to furnish and decorate interiors. As these ­examples demon­strate, there was no standard format, and homes were constructed in a variety of ways. By drawing on the established literature that focuses on the ­material culture of the home (see for example Miller 1998, 2001; Cieraad 1999

in The British in rural France
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Saskia Huc-Hepher

. My triadic construct accounts for the objective (external/material) and subjective (internal/affective) dimensions of homemaking and settlement, together with the dynamic space in between. It also allows me to provide a detailed account of how the migrants (re)construct home, the extent to which they are at home and how that sense of place and belonging maps onto the digital ‘diasberspace’. In The British in Rural France: Lifestyle migration and the ongoing quest for a better way of life (2011), Michaela Benson introduces several key themes whose pertinence

in French London
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Windows onto intimate London habitats and homemaking across cultures
Saskia Huc-Hepher

London French in the Introduction, I return here to the material lifeworlds of my respondents and explore individualised processes of emplacement (Ryan and Mulholland, 2015 ; Ryan, 2018 ; Wessendorf and Phillimore, 2018 ) and homemaking (Walsh, 2006 ; Levin, 2016 ) in London. Subdividing Bourdieu’s original habitus concept into a triad composed of habitat, habituation and habits, the following three chapters, broadly speaking, examine participants’ material homes, attitudinal change and evolving practices respectively. In this chapter, I therefore delve into the

in French London
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Polish migrants in the UK
Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska

celebrate their femininity and, more than male partners, concentrate on homemaking and caring for the family, while men perform their masculinity, focusing on the role of main breadwinner. In a parallel way, Lin ( 2013 ) shows how reconstructed family practices and conventional gender norms linked to the patriarchal family were used by migrants in China in the (re)construction of identities to cope with a sense of dislocation. According to Mahalingam and Leu ( 2005 ), sticking to traditional gender roles helps migrants in the maintenance of reimagined ethnicity, which

in Rethinking settlement and integration
New roles for women
Diana Donald

At a time when women were beginning to find opportunities for voluntary public work under the aegis of philanthropic bodies, it became possible for them to take on leading roles in the new field of animal welfare. As well as being the foremost sponsors of charities like the Metropolitan Drinking Fountain and Cattle Trough Association, women themselves founded the majority of animal refuges. They included the Battersea Dogs’ Home initiated by Mary Tealby, which overcame misogynistic prejudice to become a prominent state-subsidised institution – arguably by compromising its original home-making ideals. Sir Arthur Helps in Some Talk about Animals (1873) discerned the differences between male and female attitudes to animal suffering – women being much more impulsively compassionate. The book’s dedicatee, Baroness Angela Burdett-Coutts, was the most influential of all female animal advocates in the Victorian era, as leader of the newly created RSPCA ladies’ committee, as a very generous donor to animal causes, and as a frequent letter-writer to the press. The statue of a dog, ‘Greyfriars Bobby’, which she commissioned, was a celebration of canine fidelity; it invested animals with the moral faculties that justified human solicitude for them.

in Women against cruelty (revised edition)
New roles for women
Diana Donald

At a time when women were beginning to find opportunities for voluntary public work under the aegis of philanthropic bodies, it became possible for them to take on leading roles in the new field of animal welfare. As well as being the foremost sponsors of charities like the Metropolitan Drinking Fountain and Cattle Trough Association, women themselves founded the majority of animal refuges. They included the Battersea Dogs’ Home initiated by Mary Tealby, which overcame misogynistic prejudice to become a prominent state-subsidised institution – arguably by compromising its original home-making ideals. Sir Arthur Helps in Some Talk about Animals (1873) discerned the differences between male and female attitudes to animal suffering – women being much more impulsively compassionate. The book’s dedicatee, Baroness Angela Burdett-Coutts, was the most influential of all female animal advocates in the Victorian era, as leader of the newly created RSPCA ladies’ committee, as a very generous donor to animal causes, and as a frequent letter-writer to the press. The statue of a dog, ‘Greyfriars Bobby’, which she commissioned, was a celebration of canine fidelity; it invested animals with the moral faculties that justified human solicitude for them.

in Women against cruelty
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author: Joe Turner

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.