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Editors’ Introduction
Tanja R. Müller
and
Gemma Sou

The World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) in Istanbul in May 2016 brought the theme of innovation to the fore yet again. Innovation in a broad sense has arguably always been at the heart of any humanitarian action, at least in the basic sense of the word, as having to constantly adapt and adjust to complex and unexpected situations – to ‘innovate’, in other words. In the understanding of the WHS and within the UN system more broadly, innovation was to be strongly linked to cost effectiveness and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Nikolaos K. Tsagourias

of people in general. The situation in Liberia, for example, warranted a comprehensive humanitarian action 57 which the protection of foreign nationals partially achieved and provides the most compelling arguments for enlarging the factual and legal basis of such actions. The reports of the airlifting from the US Embassy’s compound in Liberia refer to the frustration and agony of the remaining

in Jurisprudence of international law
Emma Tomalin
and
Olivia Wilkinson

is a perception from IHs that the religious identity and commitment of LFAs means that they are less likely to be able to follow humanitarian principles. This was particularly felt to be the case with ‘impartiality’, where humanitarian action must be based on need alone and assistance is given without discrimination. 3 In this current paper, we frame our discussion around the concept of ‘legitimacy’, where the BtG project itself offers a platform to critically examine

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Synchronicity in Historical Research and Archiving Humanitarian Missions
Bertrand Taithe
,
Mickaël le Paih
, and
Fabrice Weissman

This roundtable was convened on 5 July 2022 and built on five years of collaborative work in Cambodia and ongoing collaborations within the Centre de Reflexion sur l’Action et les Savoirs Humanitaires (CRASH) at Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) between Bertrand Taithe, Mickaël le Paih and Fabrice Weissman. The central question raised in this discussion relates to two profoundly intermeshed issues for humanitarian practitioners and organisations: the use of history for humanitarian organisations, and the need for them to preserve and maintain archives.

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt
,
Isabel Muñoz Beaulieu
, and
Handreen Mohammed Saeed

principles for data responsibility in humanitarian action: accountability, confidentiality, coordination and collaboration, data security, defined purpose, necessity and proportionality, fairness and legitimacy, human-rights based approach, people-centred and inclusive, personal data protection, quality, retention and destruction, and transparency. They build from these principles to make operational recommendations for managing personal and non-personal data in humanitarian response

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Lewis Hine’s Photographs of Refugees for the American Red Cross, 1918–20
Sonya de Laat

was in the ARC’s interest, even their responsibility, to make and circulate photographs of its relief activities. American entry into the War was predicated largely on humanitarian action ( Irwin, 2013 ). For an organization that began its international assistance efforts only ten years earlier, photo-essays such as this were as important to the agency as to the recipients of their aid. To frame the refugees as victims in need of assistance contributed to building the ARC’s profile as America’s foremost relief agency. Through this straightforward syntactical

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action 1
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

achieving humanitarian goals. However, gender-transformative humanitarian action must build on and support existing cultural values, practices and movements that challenge patriarchy. Finally, I also recognise that engaging in gender-transformative action requires humanitarian actors to challenge patriarchy within the sector itself. Due to limited space, the references cited in this text may not do justice to the richness of existing literature, especially by feminist scholars

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

Introduction The modern global humanitarian system takes the form it does because it is underpinned by liberal world order, the post-1945 successor to the imperial world of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and the global political and economic system the European empires created. Humanitarian space, as we have come to know it in the late twentieth century, is liberal space, even if many of those engaged in humanitarian action would rather not see themselves as liberals. To the extent that there is something constitutively

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
David Rieff

the matter more starkly, be allowed to continue as currently constituted) than the other elements of that system. The reason for this should be self-evident: humanitarian action is an integral part of the system; indeed, it can be argued that for at least thirty years, the actions of relief agencies, above all the international private, voluntary ones, have served as the moral warrant for liberal globalisation. Only the human rights movement has been more central in this regard. 1 To be sure, the perceived need for relief NGOs to play this

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs