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Dispelling Misconceptions about Sexual Violence against Men and Boys in Conflict and Displacement
Heleen Touquet
,
Sarah Chynoweth
,
Sarah Martin
,
Chen Reis
,
Henri Myrttinen
,
Philipp Schulz
,
Lewis Turner
, and
David Duriesmith

are frequently confronted with questions about their own behavior and how they could have prevented the assault. Combined with the dearth of services across humanitarian settings and the dangers that survivors face in disclosing, the number of survivors – women/girls, men/boys, and nonbinary persons – who come forward to access services likely represent the tip of the iceberg ( Palermo et al. , 2013 ). Creating a hierarchy of gendered harms, stigma and barriers is nonsensical. As one

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Megan Daigle
,
Sarah Martin
, and
Henri Myrttinen

, F. (eds) ( 2016 ), Saving Lives and Staying Alive: Humanitarian Security in the Age of Risk Management ( London : C. Hurst & Co ). Palermo , T. , Bleck , J. and Peterman , A. ( 2013 ), ‘ Tip of the Iceberg: Reporting

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Icebergs as planetary travellers
Elizabeth Leane

In the Anthropocene, icebergs have moved from the periphery to the centre of global public consciousness, their ephemerality and mutability ominously signalling the mobile and impermanent nature of the polar regions. With ice sheets and ice shelves increasingly unstable as ocean temperatures rise, humans feel implicated for the first time in the creation of these objects. The calving of a huge tabular berg is now a political event, framed by media headlines worldwide not simply as a visual spectacle but also as a source of communal guilt, fear

in Ice humanities
Abstract only
Living, working, and thinking in a melting world

Ice humanities is a pioneering collection of essays designed to bring to the fore how change to our cryosphere is imagined and experienced. By the end of this century, we will likely be facing a world where sea ice no longer reliably forms in large areas of the Arctic Ocean, where glaciers have not just retreated but disappeared, where ice sheets collapse, and where permafrost is far from permanent. The ramifications of such change are not geophysical and biochemical – they are societal and cultural, and they are about value and loss.

Where does that leave our inherited ideas, knowledge, and experiences of ice, snow, frost, and frozen ground? How will human, animal, and plant communities superbly adapted to cold and high places cope with less, or even no, ice? The ecological services provided by ice alone are breathtaking. Just one example is the role of seasonal meltwater in providing water and food security for hundreds of millions of people around the world. The stakes could not be higher. This collection develops the field of ice humanities in order to reveal the centrality of ice in human and non-human life.

Jessica O’Reilly

I have never in my life seen so much never-ending attention paid to a single iceberg floating around in the ocean. Mike MacFerrin (@IceSheetMike), Twitter, 30 January 2021 During the Northern Hemisphere winter of 2020–21, in which much of humanity was hiding from the coronavirus pandemic, a huge iceberg travelled up the Southern Ocean's ‘iceberg alley’ and came perilously close to the

in Ice humanities
Nick Randall

and remove party leaders, and departure from the party. The dissent of Labour’s parliamentarians in the division lobbies ‘represents only the tip of an iceberg; but, like the tip of an iceberg, it represents the part that is visible’ (Norton, 1975: ix). This is not unproblematic. Whipped votes are not publicly declared. Also, MPs cannot formally register abstentions; it is impossible to differentiate deliberate abstention and absence for other reasons from division lists. This is significant because abstention en masse has been a tactic employed by PLP dissidents

in Labour united and divided from the 1830s to the present
Rafał Borysławski

discussion of transformative fear in three Exeter Book riddles: XII Hund Heafda (R.86), solved as ‘One-Eyed Seller of Garlic’; Gryrelic Hleahtor (R.33), solved as ‘Iceberg’; and Nama Min is Mære (R.26), solved as ‘Bible’. Riddles and memory There are several dimensions in which riddles are related to memory, and these may have both narrative and mnemotechnic aspects. First is the sense of memory as the experience of remembering: if our memory of something or someone is the only presence of what is tangibly absent, then Old English riddles exemplify this

in Riddles at work in the early medieval tradition
Michael Worboys

history is suggested by contemporary sociological studies of the so-called ‘symptom iceberg’: ‘the phenomenon that most symptoms are managed in the community without people seeking professional healthcare’. 2 The ‘iceberg of illness’ had been identified as early as 1949 by Percy Stocks and then by John and Elizabeth Horder in 1954. 3 In 1972, Karen Dunnell and Ann Cartwright published a study of medicine-taking in Britain, based on surveys over a two-week period

in Patient voices in Britain, 1840–1948
Abstract only
Geertje Mak

of non-intervention. The first chapter aims to understand the logic of such practices of secrecy and non-intervention; practices of which only fragmentary evidence exists, as non-intervention logically leaves no traces in historical sources. The existing traces therefore only represent the tip of the iceberg. As the cases discussed all ended up in being disclosed to a physician who published about the case, the chapter ends by asking at what point secrecy and non-intervention were exchanged for disclosure – or, when the rationale of the body started to play a

in Doubting sex
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Living, working, and thinking in a melting world
Sverker Sörlin
and
Klaus Dodds

, space, selfhood’. For example, in the very first known attempt – by the sailor Thomas Ellis travelling with Martin Frobisher to what is now Baffin Island in the 1570s – to render an illustration of an iceberg, a ‘great and monstrous peece of yce’ that, thanks to its perplexing irregularities, required no less than four representations, all poor (Heuer, 2019 : ch 1, 10). The ice humanities turn is also a means of staging an encounter with the temporality, materiality, and spatiality of ice. Some of this must involve a fundamental recognition of

in Ice humanities