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British colony, imperial capital
Author: James Whidden

The military occupation of Egypt exposed the British government to charges of self-interest and the betrayal of Britain's liberal political principles. This book is a comprehensive portrait of the British colony in Egypt, which also takes a fresh look at the examples of colonial cultures memorably enshrined in Edward W. Said's classic Orientalism. It presents a study that takes Edward Said's theory of colonial culture as a first reference and follows his method of analysing various British cultural products that involved some sort of cultural exchange. British residence in Egypt was facilitated by commercial treaties, known as the 'Capitulations'. The idea of Britain's 'civilising mission' had become justification for the repression of Egypt's liberty. Arguing that Said's analysis offered only the dominant discourse in imperial and colonial narratives, the book uses private papers, letters, memoirs, as well as the official texts, histories and government reports, to reveal both dominant and muted discourses. While imperial sentiment set the standards and sealed the ruling caste culture image, the investigation of colonial sentiment reveals a diverse colony in temperament and lifestyles, often intimately rooted in the Egyptian setting. British high commissioner Sir Miles Lampson's interventions in Egyptian domestic politics marked a momentous turning point in imperial history by spurring extremist nationalism. The interwar time of uncertainty witnessed a see-sawing of the imperialistic and the liberal or internationalist impulses.

Brad Beaven

a hall. Moreover, in offering a more nuanced approach on the relationship between the performance and the audience, we explore whether imperial sentiment expressed on stage was articulated on the streets during imperial celebrations. In adopting this approach it is argued that in both stage and cinema entertainment a local dimension was an important variant in exploring both the impact and dissemination of

in Visions of empire
John M. Mackenzie

The foundation of the Royal Colonial Institute in 1869 has often been seen as a significant event in the rise of late nineteenth-century imperial sentiment. In 1886 the planners of the Imperial Institute hoped to engross the Royal Colonial Institute, together with other bodies like the Royal Asiatic Society, under its aegis, to create a great central institution for Empire study and

in Propaganda and Empire
Exhibitions and festivals
Jeffrey Richards

and the 1938 Empire Exhibi tion in Glasgow were the two principal imperial expositions in Britain itself. The emphasis of the 1951 Festival of Britain was very largely domestic, and confirmed the decline of the imperial sentiment that had animated the exhibitions before the war. Music was a significant element in the entertainment provided at these exhibitions. For some, special music was provided

in Imperialism and music
Music for imperial films
Jeffrey Richards

Century–Fox trilogy of imperial films starring Shirley Temple, a significant fact in promoting imperial sentiment given that she was the top box office attraction in Britain from 1935 to 1938 (inclusive) and single-handedly saved the Fox Film Company from bankruptcy. Susannah of the Mounties (1939), directed by William Seiter, had more or less the same plot as Wee Willie Winkie , but set this time in Canada and

in Imperialism and music
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H. V. Bowen

Wales, it by no means exerted the only ‘pull’ force on those who wished to broaden their horizons. And, again, there is a need to know much more about what Welsh people thought about the empire after 1830. For while the emergence of a Nonconformist and eventually Liberal Wales undoubtedly gave rise to powerful strains of anti-imperial sentiment in some circles, little is known about whether the general public mood towards the empire developed along similar lines or, alternatively, was supportive, ambivalent or perhaps

in Wales and the British overseas empire
Christopher Saunders

the interests of racial equality. While pro-imperial sentiments were very directly used for instrumental purposes, however, it is important to notice that they were also expressed when other Africans alone were being addressed, as in the African press of the time. Expressions of devotion to Britain and the Empire were especially prominent during and after the South African War, for

in The South African War reappraised
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D. A. J. MacPherson

century. 206 WOMEN AND THE ORANGE ORDER This study of the Orange Order is important, then, for what it tells us about the nature of both women’s activism and women’s identity across the British world during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. And it is the longevity of imperial sentiment, especially in Scotland and Canada, which marks the broader significance of this study. As a number of historians have established, the decline of the British Empire did not become an accepted fact until well into the second half of the twentieth century. Since the First World

in Women and the Orange Order
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John M. Mackenzie

The British, it has often been said, were indifferent to imperialism. Apart from a brief, aberrant (and indeed disputed) burst of jingoism in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, they concentrated on more hard-headed domestic affairs. By the 1920s all residual imperial sentiment had been destroyed by the First World War. Imperialism as a sophisticated concept had been, and

in Propaganda and Empire
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Daniel Owen Spence

’, and its social and economic development of colonial ‘character’; and how racial ideology and discourses of power fostered a ‘seafaring race’ theory, 4 influencing naval recruitment, strategy and management, and affecting imperial sentiment, ethnic relations, colonial identities, customs and order. It is commonly acknowledged that naval history has been relatively late in engaging with the cultural

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67