Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 3,620 items for :

  • "innocents" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Infanticide and solace in the seventeenth-century Low Countries
Stijn Bussels and Bram Van Oostveldt

2 The Massacre of the Innocents: infanticide and solace in the seventeenth-century Low Countries Stijn Bussels and Bram Van Oostveldt In the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, many writers, dramatists and visual artists from the Low Countries told the biblical story of the Massacre of the Innocents. The dreadful story of Herod’s slaughter, from which Jesus narrowly escaped, had already been popular for centuries, but in this period it was represented remarkably often in the Dutch Republic, as well as in the Spanish Netherlands. The many

in The hurt(ful) body
C. R. Cheney
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Open Access (free)
Lewis Hine’s Photographs of Refugees for the American Red Cross, 1918–20
Sonya de Laat

photographs of Hine’s in the ARC Bulletin . The figures are not exact, as there are some images that appear to be Hine’s, but remain (and likely will remain) unconfirmed as they only appear in the Magazine and not in any of Hine’s or the ARC’s archival photograph collections. 7 From today’s perspective, some of Hine’s obviously staged ARC activity photographs merit art historian Daile Kaplan’s description of them as ‘superficial’, ‘nondescript’, and having ‘a didactic, illustrative quality’ ( 1988 : 61). The vast majority of them portray an innocent victim rescued by

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Awakening (2011) and Development Practices in the British Film Industry
Alison Peirse

This article reveals how screenwriter Stephen Volk‘s idea for a sequel to The Innocents (1961, Jack Clayton) became, over the course of fifteen years, the British horror film The Awakening (2011, Nick Murphy). It examines practitioner interviews to reflect on creative labour in the British film industry, while also reorientating the analysis of British horror film to the practices of pre-production, specifically development. The research reveals that female protagonist Florence Cathcart was a major problem for the project and demonstrates how the Florence character changed throughout the development process. Repeatedly rewritten and ultimately restrained by successive male personnel, her character reveals persistent, problematic perceptions of gender in British horror filmmaking.

Film Studies
Reidar Due

During a twenty-five year period, spanning the Second World War and his move from England to America, Hitchcock showed a particular preference for plots involving an unjustified accusation against the films central character. The 39 Steps (1935), Young and Innocent (1937), Saboteur (1942), Strangers on a Train (1951), I Confess (1953), The Wrong Man (1956) and North by Northwest (1959) are all variations on the same pattern with different thematic emphases. This article discusses the narrative logic and moral content of this ‘innocence plot’, running through Hitchcock‘s films from the mid-thirties to the late fifties.

Film Studies
Open Access (free)
Valérie Gorin and Sönke Kunkel

entanglements between visual media and humanitarianism. Meanwhile, other historians, international relations scholars, and political theorists have shed much light on the visual politics of aid, including works on the innocent figure of the child to depoliticize controversial contexts and build empathetic responses to distant suffering ( Burman, 1994 ; Campbell, 2012 ; Fehrenbach, 2015 ; Gigliotti, 2018 ; Gorin, 2015 ; Taithe, 2010 ), the dehistoricization and feminization of the refugee

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Jeffrey Flynn

credits Eglantyne Jebb, who co-founded the Save the Children Fund in 1919, with the ‘innovation’ of pushing beyond the focus on children for national reform projects to ‘recast them as universal symbols and the valued building blocks of a peaceful, internationalist future’ (177). By WWII, images of malnourished children had ‘popularized the notion of “the civilian” as imagined through the figure of the innocent endangered child’ (191). This ‘interpretive lens

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
The Politics of Infectious Disease
Duncan McLean and Michaël Neuman

the risks of simplifying complex situations in paternalistic images of innocent victims. More recent attempts at reconciling such contradictions are given a mildly hopeful conclusion, that the broad spectrum of humanitarian photography has provided a painful but necessary ‘record of our inhumanity’. In this issue, both the special section on the politics of infectious disease, and the other contributions, highlight and return to concerns that have long plagued humanitarianism. For

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action1
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

wars to protect vulnerable women and children – also constitutive of the ‘myth of protection’) motivate recruitment into military forces and help maintain their self-esteem ( Tickner, 2001 : 49, 57). These are complemented by images of ‘innocent women’ ( Carpenter, 2006 ), crucial to the image of heroic masculinity and the ‘myth of protection’, or images of ‘mothers-of-soldiering-sons’ or supporting wives and girlfriends

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

-state actors towards innocent civilians is increasing, along with deliberate targeting of humanitarian workers, operations and inventory used to help people trapped in conflict ( Fouad et al. , 2017 ; Stoddard et al. , 2017 ; Stoddard et al. , 2018 ). Amplifying this instability has been the slow progress towards changing the vulnerability of people living in many countries. Notwithstanding advances made in Millennium Development Goal (MDG) targets, an estimated 736

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs