Marie Mulvey-Roberts

Intermedial synergy in Angela Carter’s short fiction 17 1 Intermedial synergy in Angela Carter’s short fiction Michelle Ryan-Sautour We travel along the thread of narrative like high-wire artistes. That is our life. (Carter, 1992: 2) I n the introduction to Angela Carter’s The Curious Room: Collected Dramatic Works, Susannah Clapp speaks of a startling array of images discovered in Carter’s study following her death: ‘Drawings and paintings spilled out of these drawers’ (Clapp, 1997: ix). For Clapp these elements are more than anecdotal; they open up new

in The arts of Angela Carter
On Regie, media and spectating
Peter M. Boenisch

7 The intermedial parallax: on Regie, media and spectating Our spectatorial attention and reflexive experience of Scènes uit een huwelijk by Flemish director Ivo van Hove (b. 1958) was particularly foregrounded and intensified. His stage adaptation of Ingmar Bergman’s 1970s TV series Scenes from a Marriage, which the director created in 2005 for Toneelgroep Amsterdam, the foremost Dutch ensemble company he has been leading as artistic director since 2001, multiplied the story’s protagonists.1 The couple of Johan and Marianne was here played by three pairs of

in Directing scenes and senses
Abstract only

Film Studies is a refereed journal that approaches cinema and the moving image from within the fields of critical, conceptual and historical scholarship. The aim is to provide a forum for the interdisciplinary, intercultural and intermedial study of film by publishing innovative research of the highest quality. Contributions from diverse perspectives that are formed by the crossing of institutional and national boundaries are encouraged.

Abstract only
Swimming ... Floating ... Sinking ... Drowning
Dick Hebdige

The body in the swimming pool as metonym for trouble in paradise is a recurrent motif bordering on cliché in Hollywood/West Coast sunshine noir. Through an intermedial survey of film, TV and literary fiction, photography, design and architectural history, crime and environmental, reportage, public health and safety documents this article examines the domestic swimming pools ambiguous status as a symbol of realised utopia within the Californian mythos from the boom years of the backyard oasis in the wake of the Second World War to the era of mass foreclosures, restricted water usage and ambient dread inaugurated by 9/11, the global recession and the severest drought in the states recorded rainfall history.

Film Studies
Open Access (free)
James Baldwin, Teju Cole, and Glenn Ligon
Monika Gehlawat

This essay uses Edward Said’s theory of affiliation to consider the relationship between James Baldwin and contemporary artists Teju Cole and Glenn Ligon, both of whom explicitly engage with their predecessor’s writing in their own work. Specifically, Baldwin’s essay “Stranger in the Village” (1953) serves a through-line for this discussion, as it is invoked in Cole’s essay “Black Body” and Ligon’s visual series, also titled Stranger in the Village. In juxtaposing these three artists, I argue that they express the dialectical energy of affiliation by articulating ongoing concerns of race relations in America while distinguishing themselves from Baldwin in terms of periodization, medium-specificity, and their broader relationship to Western art practice. In their adoption of Baldwin, Cole and Ligon also imagine a way beyond his historical anxieties and writing-based practice, even as they continue to reinscribe their own work with his arguments about the African-American experience. This essay is an intermedial study that reads fiction, nonfiction, language-based conceptual art and mixed media, as well as contemporary politics and social media in order consider the nuances of the African-American experience from the postwar period to our contemporary moment. Concerns about visuality/visibility in the public sphere, narrative voice, and self-representation, as well as access to cultural artifacts and aesthetic engagement, all emerge in my discussion of this constellation of artists. As a result, this essay identifies an emblematic, though not exclusive, strand of African-American intellectual thinking that has never before been brought together. It also demonstrates the ongoing relevance of Baldwin’s thinking for the contemporary political scene in this country.

James Baldwin Review
The thinking of Regie

This book is dedicated to a conceptual exploration of the thinking of Regie: of how to think about theatre direction, and how Regietheater thinks itself. The focus is on what directing does, and what directing can do, tapping into and realising the potential of what theatre does and may do. Part I of the book outlines the social, ideological, political, cultural and aesthetic contexts of Regie, and some of its core intellectual and conceptual roots, by circumventing some standard reference points. Philosophical ideas and concepts of situating Regie within the Rancièrian 'aesthetic regime of art' and its specific 'partition of the sensible' are explained. The book specifically links Regie to Georg Hegel's influential thought, maintaining that Regie expresses a cultural dynamic of making sense and making sensible. The book presents the respective positions of Friedrich Schiller and Leopold Jessner, symptomatically capturing central trajectories of thinking the conceptual space of Regie, both mobilising the speculative dynamics of theatral thinking. Part II of the book explores the contested notion of 'the truth of the text', and the dialectic sublation of the play-text in play-performance. It looks at the mediation which the double-edged act of thea affords, with its emphasis on both performing and spectating, marked by the Žižekian notion of the 'parallax perspective'. The overarching political potential inherent in Regie and the very formal structure of theatre offer a playfully excessive resistance to the dominant logic of economy, efficiency, sustainability and austerity which defines present-day global neoliberal semiocapitalism.

New interdisciplinary essays on literature and the visual arts

This book offers a comprehensive reassessment of ekphrasis: the verbal representation of visual art. In the past twenty-five years numerous books and articles have appeared covering different aspects of ekphrasis, with scholars arguing that it is a fundamental means by which literary artists have explored the nature of aesthetic experience. However, many critics continue to rely upon the traditional conception of ekphrasis as a form of paragone (competition) between word and image. This interdisciplinary collection seeks to complicate this critical paradigm, and proposes a more reciprocal model of ekphrasis that involves an encounter or exchange between visual and textual cultures. This critical and theoretical shift demands a new form of ekphrastic poetics, which is less concerned with representational and institutional struggles, and more concerned with ideas of ethics, affect, and intersubjectivity. The book brings together leading scholars working in the fields of literary studies, art history, modern languages, and comparative literature, and offers a fresh exploration of ekphrastic texts from the Renaissance to the present day. The chapters in the book are critically and methodologically wide-ranging; yet they share an interest in challenging the paragonal model of ekphrasis that has been prevalent since the early 1990s, and establishing a new set of theoretical frameworks for exploring the ekphrastic encounter.

Ekphrasis, readers, ‘iconotexts’
Claus Clüver

Ekphrasis, readers, ‘iconotexts’239 any complex sign in any sign system will always compete with ‘text’ as a label for verbal configurations. I was furthermore willingly drawn into the discourse on ‘intermediality’ which has since absorbed most ‘interarts studies’ where I had previously located my work in this area. I have therefore reformulated the brief version of my definition: Ekphrasis is the verbal representation of real or fictive configurations composed in a non-kinetic visual medium. This formulation requires explanatory comments, here kept very brief. ‘Verbal

in Ekphrastic encounters
Véronique Bragard and Catherine Thewissen

well as mental and ethical agitation. Mousse’s version reveals itself to be a complex intermedial cultural text that reshapes and adapts various media, reinforcing a déjà-vu experience for readers, and echoing the doubles central to the diegesis. Mousse enmeshes in the text the ways in which popular culture has appropriated the figure of the Creature, which has had a long life of its own. Whale’s influence clearly operates at the visual level in Mousse’s work, but also on the diegetical level. Volume II, for instance, reframes the

in Adapting Frankenstein
Mannerism and mourning in Spanish heritage cinema
Sally Faulkner

’s release stressed her ‘precocious ambition and professionalism’ (Smith 2012: 138). The film subdiscipline of Star Studies, usually dated as beginning with Richard Dyer’s publication of Stars (1979), is predicated on film’s intermediality and intertextuality, accounting for the pertinence to a given film of a star’s involvement in other media, and for the pertinence to a given film of a star’s involvement in other films. Likewise, Audience Studies address both hybridity and impurity, because a film attracts fans or otherwise based on its location within plural cultural

in Performance and Spanish film