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Michael Byers

Introduction Most of humanity shares two searing memories: the collapse of the World Trade Center on 11 September 2001; and a hooded man standing on a box with wires dangling from his outstretched hands. These images capture the painful truth that both sides in the so-called ‘war on terror’ have violated fundamental rules. But while non-state actors can violate international law, only states are able to change the law, making their breaches of greater potential consequence. In this chapter, I consider how the recent actions of the United States

in ‘War on terror’
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

Advocates and opponents of humanitarian intervention From the 1860s onwards, international law became an academic discipline in its own right in Europe and the Americas, taught separately from philosophy, natural law or civil law, and came to be written by professional academics or theoretically inclined diplomats. 1 Until then what existed was the droit public de l’Europe or ‘external public law’. Britain in particular had to

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Law and conflicts over water in the Krishna River Basin
Radha D’Souza

underwent radical transformation. Indeed, it is possible to argue that the schisms internalized in the legal systems enabled new forms of imperial relations to emerge after the old forms of political colonialism ended. This paper attempts to locate the role of law within debates on the imperialist nature of world political economy after international law, through the UN Charter

in Law, history, colonialism
Casper Sylvest

CH APTER 3 Legal evolution and the redemption of international law The dilemma of international law is that of ecclesiastical dogma. Elastic interpretation adapted to diverse needs increases the number of the faithful. Rigid interpretation, though theoretically desirable, provokes secessions from the church. (E. H. Carr, 19391) It has become a commonplace to note that the modern body of inter­ national law, shared by a society of civilised nations, has its roots in the classical tradition of jus gentium and in a ‘law of nations’ applicable to a family of

in British liberal internationalism, 1880–1930
David Armitage

PARLIAMENT AND INTERNATIONAL LAW 9 Parliament and international law in the eighteenth century 1 David Armitage The study of parliament and international law in the eighteenth century illuminates crucial distinctions among nation, state and empire. For example, after 1603 but before 1707, the Scottish parliament in Edinburgh represented a nation but aroused English opposition whenever it tried to legislate as if Scotland were an independent state. Before 1801, the Irish parliament in Dublin represented only a very narrowly defined Irish nation and, prior to the

in Parliaments, nations and identities in Britain and Ireland, 1660–1850
Jérémie Gilbert

91 Chapter 4 CERD’s contribution to the development of the rights of indigenous peoples under international law Jérémie Gilbert* Introduction The rights of indigenous peoples under international human rights law have greatly evolved in the last two decades, notably with the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in 2007 which came to light after more than twenty years of negotiations.1 In terms of international legal standards, there are two main approaches to the rights of indigenous peoples, one stemming from

in Fifty years of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination
Setting the precedent

This book is an attempt at a comprehensive presentation of the history of humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century, the heyday of this controversial doctrine. It starts with a brief presentation of the present situation and debate. The theoretical first part of the book starts with the genealogy of the idea, namely the quest for the progenitors of the idea in the sixteenth and seventeenth century which is a matter of controversy. Next the nineteenth century ‘civilization-barbarity’ dichotomy is covered and its bearing on humanitarian intervention, with its concomitant Eurocentric/Orientalist gaze towards the Ottomans and other states, concluding with the reaction of the Ottomans (as well as the Chinese and Japanese). Then the pivotal international law dimension is scrutinized, with the arguments of advocates and opponents of humanitarian intervention from the 1830s until the 1930s. The theoretical part of the book concludes with nineteenth century international political theory and intervention (Kant, Hegel, Cobden, Mazzini and especially J.S. Mill). In the practical second part of the book four cases studies of humanitarian intervention are examined in considerable detail: the Greek case (1821-1831), the Lebanon/Syria case (1860-61), the Balkan crisis and Bulgarian case (1875-78) in two chapters, and the U.S. intervention in Cuba (1895-98). Each cases study concludes with its bearing on the evolution of international norms and rules of conduct in instances of humanitarian plights. The concluding chapter identifies the main characteristics of intervention on humanitarian grounds during this period and today’s criticism and counter-criticism.

Abstract only
The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 2006
Editor: Chris Miller

'Terror' is a diffuse notion that takes no account of local particularities and 'war on terror' is a contradiction in terms. This book is based on the lectures that were given on the subject in Oxford in 2006. Amnesty has described 'war on terror' as a war on human rights. It is also a contest of narratives: stories that the protagonists tell about themselves, about their enemies, and about what is happening now. The book considers how the recent actions of the United States have stressed and stretched two areas of international law: the right of self-defence, and the rules of international humanitarian law. State terrorism, with a bit of careful spin, can be reclassified as counter-terrorism, in other words as inherently good in the same way that terrorism is inherently bad. The book engages with the politico-conceptual difficulties of distinguishing between war and terrorism. The interface and tensions between the human rights tradition and the Islamic tradition, particularly Islamic law, is discussed. The intensification of Western repression against Islamic thinkers or activists has at times been coupled with policies that seemed designed to change the religious trajectory of society. The sexualization of torture is only one way in which the 'war on terror' has delineated who is (and who is not) human. Religion, human rights, and trauma narratives are three other mechanisms for rationalizing suffering. The book also discusses the subject of censuring reckless killing of innocent civilians by the issue of fatwas by Muslim teachers.

This book is a full-length study of the rights of indigenous peoples in international law, focusing in particular on instruments of human rights. The primary reference point is contemporary law, though the book also examines the history of indigenous peoples through the lens of historical legal discourses. The work critically assesses the politics of definition and analyses contested definitions and descriptions of indigenous groups. Most of the chapters are devoted to detailed examination of existing and emerging human rights texts at global and regional levels. Among the instruments considered in the book are the International Covenants on Human Rights, the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, the African Charter on Human and People's Rights, and the ILO Conventions on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples.

A living instrument

Nineteenth-century international law imbibed the racist virus. The twentieth century attempted to find an escape through fundamental, principled restatements of the equality and dignity of human beings and the worth of the cultures of humanity in all their subtlety and variety. The International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD) was preceded by the Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination in 1963, and converted its premises into legally binding standards. The ICERD carried the hopes and aspirations of many in the international community for an international order of mutual respect and harmony among nations and peoples. This book tracks the debates that have shaped Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination's (CERD) policies and practices on disaggregated data over its first forty-five years. The UN World Conference Against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and related Intolerance (WCAR) created an opportunity for the family of nations to engage in a global dialogue. The rights of indigenous peoples under international human rights law have greatly evolved with the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in 2007. CERD's serious attention to the continuing role played by anti-Romani sentiment - anti-Gypsyism - in shaping the societies is required. The central concern of General Recommendation 35 (2013) of the CERD was to figure out and set out how the 'resources' of the ICERD can be optimally 'mobilised' for the purpose of combating racist hate speech.