Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 111 items for :

  • "international crime" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Author:

This book provides a critical exposition of the international law concerning child soldiers. It starts by looking at the situation of child soldiers in the world today, examining why children are recruited into armed forces and groups; why they volunteer for military service; and, once recruited, what treatment they receive. The book explores how perceptions of childhood and children's rights have changed, and how this has affected the ways in which child soldiers have been treated. It describes the activities of the United Nations with regard to the child soldier phenomenon. The book examines the legal regulation of the recruitment and use of children in hostilities. It shows that although international law comprehensively regulates the recruitment and use of child soldiers, owing to the plethora of treaties on the subject, states' obligations continue to differ and children can still lawfully be recruited and used to participate in armed conflict. The book discusses how, once recruited into armed forces and groups, international law treats child soldiers. It considers the status of child soldiers as combatants and as persons in the power of an adverse party in both international and internal armed conflicts, and states' obligations with regard the disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration of child soldiers. An unusual feature of how child soldiers are viewed is that they are often seen as both victims of human rights abuses and as human rights violators. Finally, the book examines the extent to which the recruitment and use of child soldiers is an international crime.

Math Noortmann
and
Luke D. Graham

Rwanda Tribunal, as well as the conception of international crimes . The four international crimes (see section 105 ) form the core of international criminal law in the narrow sense and can be found in particular in: the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court 1998; other core legal texts of the International Criminal Court; the case law of various

in The basics of international law
Matthew Happold

atrocities, given that their participation in hostilities is frequently coerced. It will, however, be seen that international law provides only vague guidelines with regard to the minimum age of criminal responsibility and only permits duress as a defence to international crimes in very limited circumstances. We will also look at the scope of the defence of intoxication, although it will be seen quickly that this

in Child soldiers in international law
Abstract only
Nigel D. White

an analysis of Article 2 and Chapters VII and VII of the UN Charter, and the constituent treaties of security and defence organisations. The different military responses undertaken by IGOs, ranging from observation and peacekeeping to enforcement and war-fighting, are discussed in terms of legality and practice. The chapter considers the duties of IGOs as well as their powers; in particular whether there is an emerging duty upon the UN (and possibly other IGOs) to take action in response to the commission of core international crimes (genocide, crimes against

in The law of international organisations (third edition)
Anne Lagerwall

. Fundamental criticism of international criminal justice Many of the critiques which have been addressed by scholars to international criminal justice are voiced and valued in films and TV series. 37 The idea that justice is a spectacle working as a diversion from our collective responsibilities in the commission of international crimes or as a legitimizing device for States to tell their own version of history is regularly expressed in movies. Cinema also denounces international criminal justice as an enterprise governed by Western interest, echoing a critique that has

in Cinematic perspectives on international law
Introduction
Matthew Happold

party in both international and internal armed conflicts, and states’ obligations with regard the disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration of child soldiers. An unusual feature of how child soldiers are viewed is that they are often seen as both victims of human rights abuses and as human rights violators. Chapter 8 examines the extent to which the recruitment and use of child soldiers is an international crime. This

in Child soldiers in international law
Matthew Happold

serious reasons for considering that: (a) he has committed a crime against peace, a war crime, or a crime against humanity, as defined in the international instruments drawn up to make provision in respect of such crimes’. Article 1F is framed in mandatory language. It would appear that contracting states have no discretion as to whether or not to grant refugee status to persons suspected of international crimes

in Child soldiers in international law
Leslie C. Green

War defined The International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg held that ‘a war of aggression . . . is the supreme international crime . . . in that it contains within itself the accumulated evil of the whole’. 1 Since there is an ‘aggressor’ in every war, it would seem that to speak of a ‘law of war’ is something of a paradox lacking any real

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Norman Geras

it has since become an undisputed member of the group of offences which the consensus of legal opinion includes under that head. In December 1984 the UN Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment was adopted by the General Assembly, and it is a notable feature of this convention that it makes torture an international crime without any reference to its having to be practised on a wide scale or in a systematic way in order for it to be so regarded. According to Article 4 of the Convention Against Torture, 61 Slye

in Crimes against humanity
Towards a transitional justice role
Lydia A. Nkansah

the jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice’, Maryland Journal of International Law 27:1 (2012), 323–​54. 41 See Georgia v. Russia (II), App No, 38263/​08, Eur. Ct. H.R. Preliminary Objections (2011). 216 216  Conflict and resolution The Nuremberg and the Tokyo tribunals in 1945 for the abuses of the Second World War marked the beginning of international criminal justice. In 1992 the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) was established in response to the international crimes including genocide which took place in that

in Fifty years of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination