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The European Union (EU) has emerged as an important security actor qua actor, not only in the non-traditional areas of security, but increasingly as an entity with force projection capabilities. This book investigates how the concept of security relates to or deals with different categories of threat, explores the relationship between forms of coordination among states, international institutions, and the provision of European security and the execution of security governance. It also investigates whether the EU has been effective in realising its stated security objectives and those of its member states. The book commences with a discussion on the changing nature of the European state, the changing nature and broadening of the security agenda, and the problem of security governance in the European political space. There are four functional challenges facing the EU as a security actor: the resolution of interstate conflicts, the management of intrastate conflicts, state-building endeavours, and building the institutions of civil society. The book then examines policies of prevention, particularly the pre-emption of conflict within Europe and its neighbourhood. It moves on to examine policies of assurance, particularly the problem of peace-building in south-eastern Europe. EU's peace-building or sustaining role where there has been a violent interstate or intrastate conflict, especially the origins and performance of the Stability Pact, is discussed. Finally, the book looks at the policies of protection which capture the challenge of internal security.

Abstract only
Bernadette C. Hayes
and
Ian McAllister

The post-cold war era has witnessed a proliferation of intrastate conflicts based on ethnic differences. Intrastate conflicts, or civil wars, have now replaced interstate conflicts, or international wars, as the most prevalent and deadliest form of violence in the international system today (Wallensteen, 2012 ). Currently, 95 per cent of wars are civil wars, and the large

in Conflict to peace
Abstract only
Chen Kertcher

conflict inside states. Thus sometimes terms such as ‘multidimensional’ or multifunctional operations are used to define the second generation of peacekeeping operations. They emphasise that these operations are characterised by multiple objectives, such as democratisation, building new national security institutions, providing humanitarian assistance and the advancement of human rights. Their main goal is to end intrastate conflicts through these multiple functions. Others prefer to view these operations as supporting the basic foundations for the maintenance of peace.1

in The United Nations and peacekeeping, 1988–95
Chen Kertcher

3 Agenda for peacekeeping 1992–93 The positive momentum for execution of peacekeeping operations continued between 1992 and 1993. In 1992, the Security Council resolved to execute four new operations in the former Yugoslavia, Mozambique, Somalia and Cambodia. In 1993, the Council decided to intervene in four new sites: in Georgia (FSU), Haiti, Liberia and Rwanda. Intensive activity took place in the UN despite the lack of clarity regarding the effectiveness of implementation of the traditional operations with regard to intrastate conflicts. That was one of the

in The United Nations and peacekeeping, 1988–95
Abstract only
Bernadette C. Hayes
and
Ian McAllister

It is increasingly accepted that religion is a cause of many of the world’s violent conflicts. The vast majority of contemporary conflicts are intrastate conflicts and involve issues of religious, national or ethnic identity. Although religious conflicts in general have been less common in the post-Second World War era than nonreligious conflicts – or ethnonational

in Conflict to peace
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The EU and the governance of European security
Emil Kirchner
and
James Sperling

by the arena of conflict (state or society) and the instruments of conflict resolution (coercive or persuasive). These two variables produce a typology presenting four categories of security challenge that have either confronted the EU or continue to do so: interstate and intrastate conflict, state-building, and the construction of the institutions of a civil democratic society (see Figure 1

in EU security governance
Stephen Emerson
and
Hussein Solomon

conflict diamonds of Sierra Leone and the mineral wealth of the DRC, natural resources have been integral elements of these political struggles. UN environmental experts believe that 40 percent of all intrastate conflicts around the world in the last 60 years have links to natural resources, and “that this link doubles the risk of a conflict relapse in the first five years.”1 Furthermore, over the past two decades some 18 violent 170 African security in the twenty-first century conflicts have been fueled by the exploitation of natural resources.2 But what exactly is

in African security in the twenty-first century
Abstract only
Sophie Haspeslagh

terrorist organisations. Of the forty armed conflicts active in 2014, all bar one were being fought within states (Pettersson and Wallensteen 2015 ). These armed intrastate conflicts tend to be asymmetrical in nature, pitting the state against one or more non-state armed actors. 3 It was made explicitly illegal to provide

in Proscribing peace
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State security and its effects on civil society in Uganda
David Andrew Omona
and
Scott N. Romaniuk

. www.independent.co.ug/uganda-fear-ngo-big-money/ Omona , D. A. ( 2015 ). “Management of postcolonial intrastate conflicts in Uganda: A case of northern Uganda,” PhD thesis. Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya

in Counter-terrorism and civil society
Emilian Kavalski
and
Magdalena Zolkos

nature recognition (and nature misrecognition) in international life, subject to biocentric and/or ecocentric lines of inquiry and premised on a methodological move away from ‘shallow’ concerns for environmental issues of inter- and intrastate conflict and cooperation and towards ‘deeper’ preoccupations with systemic diversity, interconnectivity and symbiosis that cut across the traditional

in Recognition and Global Politics