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Anne Ring Petersen

Migrant geographies and European politics of irregular migration Globalisation is frequently thought to cause an unbounded movement of capital, people, information, culture and goods. However, there is an often neglected flip side to this globalised mobility: the increased international collaboration on border controls aimed at restricting the movements of people who have been forced to migrate because of war, destitution, persecution or environmental reasons. This securitisation of borders constructs categories of included and excluded populations; and the

in Migration into art
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Transcultural identities and art-making in a globalised world

Migration, understood as the movement of people and cultures, gives impetus to globalisation and the transculturation processes that the interaction between people and cultures entails. This book addresses migration as a profoundly transforming force that has remodelled artistic and art institutional practices across the world. It explores contemporary art's critical engagement with migration and globalisation as a key source for improving our understanding of how these processes transform identities, cultures, institutions and geopolitics. The book also explores three interwoven issues of enduring interest: identity and belonging, institutional visibility and recognition of migrant artists, and the interrelations between aesthetics and politics, and its representations of forced migration. Transculturality indicates a certain quality (of an idea, an object, a self-perception or way of living) which joins a variety of elements indistinguishable as separate sources. The topic of migration is permeated not only with political but also with ethical urgencies. The most telling sign of how profoundly the mobility turn has affected the visual arts is perhaps the spread of the term global art in the discourses on art, where it is often used as a synonym for internationally circulating contemporary art. The book examines interventions by three artists who take a critical de- and postcolonial approach to the institutional structures and spaces of Western museums. The book also looks at the politics of representation, and particularly the question of how aesthetics, politics and ethics can be triangulated and balanced when artists seek to make visible the conditions of irregular migration.

Sanctuary and security in Toronto, Canada
Graham Hudson

resistance to the Government of Sri Lanka’ (The Canadian Record, 2010 ). All of the passengers were detained, and concerted efforts were made to exclude them from claiming refugee status, including by intervening in RSD hearings (Hudson, 2018 ). Links between security and irregular migration have been a constant theme in Canada (Robinson, 1983 ), but the period between 2010 and 2013 was especially toxic (Krishnamurti, 2013 ; Kaushal and Dauvergne, 2011 ). Irregular migrants were cast as 1) dangerous, deceitful, threatening, and underserving

in Sanctuary cities and urban struggles
The limits of the EU’s external dimension of migration in Africa
Tine Van Criekinge

insertion of a migration clause, Article 13, was amongst the most contentious issues during the Cotonou negotiations, highlighting the weight and importance of the issue for both the EU and the ACP. It defines the parameters of the EU–ACP dialogue on migration, and is essentially the result of a difficult compromise between the parties’ different views and interests. While on the EU side, member 260 Policies and partnerships states, under domestic pressure to reduce irregular migration stemming from Africa, strongly endorsed the integration of a readmission clause

in The European Union in Africa
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Alex Balch

EU. In contrast, the more internationalist PSOE found it easier to adopt the more liberal discourse of the European Commission, while maintaining Spain’s protagonism through the EU in associated measures on irregular migration. In the UK, the party political dimension had a more path-dependent dimension, with the memories of previous electoral fortunes linked with different approaches to the issue of migration. The connection between types of expertise and the introduction of new ideas and new policy frames is not a straightforward task. To begin with, it is

in Managing labour migration in Europe
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Labour migration policy change in Spain
Alex Balch

-Alarcon 2000: 334). The issues of security and terrorism haunt the political debate in Spain. Political violence, chiefly in the form of the Basque terrorist group ETA, has long been a feature of the Spanish political landscape. Aznar used the events of 9/11 as part of his argument to reinforce the government crackdown on terrorism, and presented Spain’s alliance with the USA over the war on terror as part of its strategy to weaken ETA (Heywood 2003: 36). The connection has also regularly been made between irregular migration and (in)security. It should be noted that the

in Managing labour migration in Europe
Alex Balch

, in these areas. The features of the incremental integration that developed from the late 1990s, mainly on measures to reduce asylum and irregular migration, has raised concerns over the BAL_06.indd 159 5/6/2010 9:48:32 AM 160 Managing labour migration in Europe construction of ‘fortress Europe’. This has been linked to the debate over securitisation (Bigo 2002), which highlights the ways in which security measures have been applied to migration in the EU with developments such as the new Schengen information system1 and proposals for ‘rapid border intervention

in Managing labour migration in Europe
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Jonathan Benthall

of power and stimulate business enterprise; and working at a local level to fortify grass-roots organizations, including women’s groups and zakat committees. As this book goes to press, the scale of trans-Mediterranean irregular migration and its consequences were finally becoming evident to all – with a parallel in South East Asia where the new ‘boat people’ in desperate

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
Odeas, knowledge and policy change
Alex Balch

pragmatism could be expressed in the interests of a business-friendly image. Turning to the right, the linkage between Conservative parties and an internal security frame is perhaps less surprising. Margaret Thatcher’s speeches on the public anxiety induced by immigration flows are mirrored by Aznar’s arguments about the threat posed by irregular migration to ‘the undermining of people’s dignity and insecurity’.1 Speaking about the case of Spain, Arango suggests that one can detect a fairly straightforward left–right divide on immigration policies where experts and

in Managing labour migration in Europe
Globalisation, securitisation and control
Christopher Baker-Beall

for the EU. The first is a discourse that emphasises the positive aspects of migration for European society, constructing external migration as an opportunity that can bring important economic benefits to the EU and its member states. By way of contrast, the second is a discourse that constructs migration, or more specifically ‘irregular migration’, as a potential threat to public order, domestic stability and the ‘cultural composition of the nation’.67 Christina Boswell has argued that the framing of ‘irregular migration’ in the period before 11 September 2001 was

in The European Union’s fight against terrorism