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A Case of Terminal Uniqueness
Thomas Schmid

Mary Shelley‘s Frankenstein reflects both Romantic critiques of autonomy, as they have been recently defined by Nancy Yousef, and discourses of isolation and addiction as they appear in key texts by Samuel Coleridge and Charles Lamb. For Coleridge and Lamb, addiction leads to what current specialists often call ‘terminal uniqueness’, a feeling of isolation both incommunicable to others and incapable of being heard by a non-addicted audience. In its own portrayals of isolation, Frankenstein may be seen to intersect with these larger discourses of isolation, chemical dependence, and what Anya Taylor calls ‘the empty self ’ of Romantic addiction.

Gothic Studies
Law between semicolonial China and the Raj
Emily Whewell

isolation from colonial and consular administration. Such isolation was common in the colonial world. As Zoe Laidlaw has shown, colonial governors were often left to themselves to assert their power and administer imperial directives. 39 For Macartney, his task also involved battling with a sovereign power, having no guaranteed legal rights and falling administratively between colonial and consular structures of governance. Even when the Qing granted Macartney informal powers to hear cases involving British defendants, continued Chinese interference meant that he

in Law across imperial borders
Zoë Laidlaw

Gipps’s tongue-in-cheek letter identifies some of the difficulties that a colonial governor faced: isolation from metropole and colonists; constant financial pressure; professional uncertainty; and grinding hard work. Gipps was lucky to have a confidant like Superintendent La Trobe separated by only the week’s travel between Sydney and Melbourne. Many other governors were far

in Colonial connections, 1815–45
The Korean Horror Films of Ahn Byeong-ki
Ian Conrich

The new wave of Korean cinema has presented a series of distinct genre productions, which are influenced by contemporary Japanese horror cinema and traditions of the Gothic. Ahn Byeong-ki is one of Korea‘s most notable horror film directors, having made four Gothic horrors between 2000 and 2006. These transnational horrors, tales of possession and avenging forces, have repeatedly been drawn to issues of modernity, loneliness, identity, gender, and suicide. Focusing on the figure of the ghostly woman, and the horrors of modern city life in Korea, this essay considers the style of filmmaking employed by Ahn Byeong-ki in depicting, in particular, the Gothic revelation.

Gothic Studies
Rachel Cope

Although Catherine Livingston Garrettson (1752–1849) initially encountered feelings of isolation upon converting to Methodism, she discovered that the written word allowed her to engage in relational rather than solitary religious experiences. Over time, the written word helped her create a web of meaningful ties with imagined and actual kin and motivated her to form, develop and foster additional relationships in multiple contexts. Garrettson’s story thus demonstrates the need to consider how the real and imagined communities encountered through reading and constructed through writing have played a role in the spiritual development of early American women. Indeed, women’s experiences serve not simply to explain aspects of American social development, but to illuminate their broader world of connections – familial, religious, social and literary.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Abstract only
The Face of the Star in Neorealisms Urban Landscape
Ora Gelley

Although Europa 51 (1952) was the most commercially successful of the films Roberto Rossellini made with the Hollywood star, Ingrid Bergman, the reception by the Italian press was largely negative. Many critics focussed on what they saw to be the ‘unreal’ or abstract quality of the films portrayal of the postwar urban milieu and on the Bergman character‘s isolation from the social world. This article looks at how certain structures of seeing that are associated in the classical style with the woman as star or spectacle - e.g., the repetitious return to her fixed image, the resistance to pulling back from the figure of the woman in order to situate her within a determinate location and set of relationships between characters and objects - are no longer restricted to her image but in fact bleed into or “contaminate” the depiction of the world she inhabits. In other words, whereas the compulsive return to the fixed image of the woman tends to be contained or neutralised by the narrative economy and editing patterns (ordered by sexual difference) of the classical style, in Rossellini‘s work this ‘insistent’ even aberrant framing in relation to the woman becomes a part of the (female) characters and the cameras vision of the ‘pathology’ of the urban landscape in the aftermath of the war.

Film Studies
Open Access (free)
Jazzing the Blues Spirit and the Gospel Truth in James Baldwin’s “Sonny’s Blues”
Steven C. Tracy

The webs of musical connection are essential to the harmony and cohesion of James Baldwin’s “Sonny’s Blues.” As a result, we must explore the spectrum of musical references Baldwin makes to unveil their delicate conjunctions. It is vital to probe the traditions of African-American music—Spirituals, Blues, Jazz, and Pop—to get a more comprehensive sense of how Baldwin makes use of music from the sacred and secular continuum in the African-American community. Looking more closely at the variety of African-American musical genres to which Baldwin refers in the story, we can discern even more the nuances of unity that Baldwin creates in his story through musical allusions, and shed greater light on Baldwin’s exploration of the complexities of African-American life and music, all of which have as their core elements of human isolation, loneliness, and despair ameliorated by artistic expression, hope, and the search for familial ties. Through musical intertextuality, Baldwin demonstrates not only how closely related seemingly disparate (in the Western tradition) musical genres are, but also shows that the elements of the community that these genres flow from and represent are much more in synchronization than they sometimes seem or are allowed to be. To realize kinship across familial (Creole), socio-economic (the brother), and most importantly for this paper appreciation and meanings of musical genres advances to Sonny the communal cup of trembling that is both a mode and an instance of envisioning and treating music in its unifying terms, seeing how they coalesce through a holistic vision.

James Baldwin Review
Lessons Learned from an Intervention by Médecins Sans Frontières
Maria Ximena Di Lollo, Elena Estrada Cocina, Francisco De Bartolome Gisbert, Raquel González Juarez, and Ana Garcia Mingo

reduce transmission (e.g. isolation) versus the mental health consequences of living or dying in solitude. MSF aimed to ensure dignified treatment and care while reinforcing individual autonomy. Support was given to care home staff to help residents with their mobility, as well as facilitating calls or face-to-face visits with their families. MSF also provided some assistance in the end-of-life process for the last farewell. This was all done without

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Congolese Experience
Justine Brabant

particular, networks forged by years of being there on the ground. As a journalist I am alone, and in the best-case scenario I have a vehicle and three phone numbers that a colleague held onto from a previous assignment. Creative use of these limited resources and, above all, the war reporter’s isolation – which allows a more independent, yet fragile, view of the violence – are mentioned by Adrien Jaulmes, a Le Figaro reporter and ex-soldier (he was a lieutenant in the Foreign

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Positioning, Politics and Pertinence
Natalie Roberts

to the relief of suffering, as MSF public communications now claimed that ‘with the correct intervention and careful monitoring of the situation, it is possible to limit the spread of the outbreak’ ( MSF, 2018a ) via the tracing and early isolation of people suspected to be suffering from the disease. These claims would not be proven in Equateur, however. Most of the fifty-four Ebola cases were identified in the ten days after the declaration of the epidemic ( WHO

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs