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Author: Brigitte Rollet

Coline Serreau is one of the most famous female French directors alive, not only in France but also abroad. This book is devoted not only to some relevant biographical aspects of Serreau's personal and artistic life, but also to the social, historical and political context of her debut. It deals with the 1970s' flavour of Serreau's work and more especially with the importance of politics. Taking intertextuality in its broadest sense, it assesses the strong literary influence on the tone, genre and content of Serreau's films and dramas. The book is concerned with the cinematographic genres Serreau uses. It provides a description and an analysis of Serreau's comedies, within the wider perspective of French comedies. The book also deals with the element of 'family' or community which is recurrent in Serreau's films and plays. During the 1980s, Serreau's career moved towards fiction, and she worked both for the cinema and the theatre. Serreau often underlines her family's lack of financial resources. The book considers the specificity of French cinema in the 1970s before analysing in more detail Serreau's first film. Serreau's work on stage and on big or small screens was strongly influenced by the political mood which succeeded May '68 in France. The book also discusses the idea of utopia which was the original theme of Serreau' first documentary and which is central to her first fiction film, Pourquoi pas!. Female humour and laughter cannot be considered without another powerful element: the motivation of often transgressive laughter.

Rethinking history at its ‘lowest ebb’
Noelle Gallagher

. I have a further incentive for choosing these two particular texts in the transparency with which both of them can be linked with specific kinds of historical literature. Like all literary works, North’s and Oldmixon’s narratives demonstrate a range of potential literary influences – but both the Examen and the Stuart history provide for a relatively uncomplicated analysis

in Historical literatures
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Brigitte Rollet

eighteenth-century French literature are also an obvious inspiration. Taking intertextuality in its broadest sense, Chapter 3 will assess the strong literary influence on the tone, genre and content of Serreau’s films and dramas. Fairy-tales and philosophical tales, together with the social and political satire characteristicof seventeenth- and eighteenth-century French literature,are combined with a 1970s’ flavour by the director-dramatistwho addresses issues of gender and race which were not on the agenda of the male French

in Coline Serreau
Diana Cullell

to that of the social poets who had prevailed in the literary field. The novísimos were highly influenced by the mass media and new popular culture, and their literary influences stemmed mainly from outside Spain (Europe and America) or from Spanish authors forgotten and ignored by the canon of the time. They were interested in current and past European aesthetics as well as its most cultural and elitist trends, which generated ‘una suerte de desenfreno culturalista’ (Villena 2000: 19). This gave rise in their poetry to ‘aestheticism, decadentism, the use of formal

in Spanish contemporary poetry
Apocalypse on the road in Amnesia Moon
James Peacock

very process of writing has the potential to stand at odds with the ethical concerns the writer wishes to explore. Just as they do in Gun, With Occasional Music , these concerns become embroiled in questions of literary influence. Although there is evidence of other influences – ‘the green’ has echoes of the ‘airborne toxic event’ in Don DeLillo’s White Noise , for

in Jonathan Lethem
Open Access (free)
Intimate relations
Irina Dumitrescu

literary influence does not travel in one direction alone. Martha Malamud has shown that Ausonius’ Cento nuptialis outrageously alters Vergil's Aeneid , from which it draws; it becomes impossible to read the original epic without interference from the Cento 's erotic imagery. 4 Beowulf , too, despite being the couple's senior, is transformed through Andreas 's imitation. Its pagans become monstrous, as Richard North has recognized. 5

in Dating Beowulf
Susanne Becker

Filliation The web of feminine gothic writing has prompted contemporary critics to revise traditional concepts of literary influence: this new thinking about a feminine intertextualisation, which Barbara Godard calls ‘filliation’, and some core examples from historical gothicism are the focus of this section. Second, neo-gothicism also

in Gothic Forms of Feminine Fictions
Tim William Machan

, or literary influences, then, this book is above all a theoretical inquiry into the persistence, independent imitation, and reproduction of Nordic tropes for the imagining of Britain and its medieval past. This last point, on my methods, requires additional comment. Discussing how cultural memories are formed and function, Jan Assmann has suggested that every ‘culture formulates something that might be called a connective structure. It has a binding effect that works on two levels – social and temporal. It binds people together by providing a “symbolic universe

in Northern memories and the English Middle Ages
Stanley van der Ziel

This chapter presents an interview of John McGahern by the author in the Gresham Hotel on O'Connell Street, Dublin, on 12 October 2004. The interview pre-dates the publication of Memoir and Creatures of the Earth, as well as the instigation of a collected edition of his occasional non-fictional prose. The interview brings together many of the topics such as: McGahern's literary influences, his style, critical writing, his views on painting, on ritual, Dublin circles of the 1960s and the process of 'getting the words right'. McGahern think that the novel is the most social of all the art forms, and is the most dependent on a system of manners. The system of manners is intricately linked to style. Style is the expression of personality, which is a mysterious thing.

in John McGahern
Chaucer, Spenser and Luke Shepherd’s ‘New Poet’
Harriet Archer

This chapter contends that Spenser’s play on the tension between old and new in his Shepherdes Calender (1579), and its construction of Geoffrey Chaucer as both a canonical forefather and a byword for subversion, may be productively set in dialogue with the rudderless ‘new poet’ sent up by the gospeller Luke Shepherd’s satire Philogamus (1548). What did it mean for Spenser to be introduced as a ‘new poet’ in the late sixteenth century? How did current conceptions of literary change and continuity shape the significance of the epithet for Spenser’s first readers, and what particular discourses did its deployment activate? By considering the broad range of novelty’s contemporary connotations, the chapter suggests how the Tudor reinterpretation of Chaucer’s legacy informs further facets of Spenser’s engagement with the idea of newness, beyond the dynamic of literary influence and innovation. Religious reforms had invested ‘novelty’ with confessional significance, while new poetry represented a challenge to textual authorities from established religious doctrines to the nascent vernacular canon to historical truth. This chapter shows Spenser navigating this contested landscape in a guise redolent of Shepherd’s literary fool, to effect the instigation of a complex, layered authorial identity.

in Rereading Chaucer and Spenser