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Britain, 1945–90
Author: Carmen Mangion

Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age examines the changes in religious life for women religious in Britain from 1945 to 1990 identifying how community and individual lives were altered. This work is grounded in three core premises: women religious were influenced by and participated in the wider social movements of the long 1960s; women’s religious institutes were transnational entities and part of a larger global happening; and the struggles of renewal were linked to competing and contradictory ideas of collective, institutional identities. The work pivots on the Second Vatican Council (1962–1965), but considers pre and post Vatican II social, cultural and religious events and social movements of the 1960s as influencers in these changes. It interrogates ‘lived experience’ by examining the day-to-day lives of women religious. Though rooted in the experiences of women religious in Britain, the book probes the relationships and interconnectivities between women religious within and across national divides as they move from institutions embedded in uniformity to the acceptance of cultural plurality. It also engages with the histories of the social movements of the long 1960s. For too long, religion has been relegated to its own silo, unlinked to the ‘radical sixties’ and depicted as ultimately obstructionist to its social movements. To contest this, female religious life is examined as a microcosm of change in the Catholic Church pointing to the ‘new thinking and freer lifestyles’ that allowed for the questioning of institutional cultures.

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A Vatican rag
Alana Harris

Alberigo and other, 001-031 FaithFamily Ch 1 Intro.indd 5 24/04/2013 15:43 6 Faith in the family ‘Bologna-school’ inspired scholars,18 or the theologically progressive strands of North American Catholicism that draw authority and sanction for present-day activism through reference to conciliar changes.19 This book eschews either approach through adopting a ‘lived religious history’ methodology, which takes seriously the immediate period of conciliar ‘reception’, that is from 1964 until the early 1970s, when contemporary interpreters were caught up in the whirlwind

in Faith in the family
Lucy Underwood

ecumenical dilemma’, Recusant History, 30 (2011), 573–87; J.  Davies, ‘A cult from above: the cause for canonisation of John Fisher and Thomas More’, Recusant History, 28 (2007), 458–74; A. Harris, Faith in the Family: A Lived Religious History of English Catholicism, 1945–1982 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013), pp. 233–50.  5 Norman, Catholic Church, pp. 201–43, especially pp. 205–6, 216–20.  6 R. O’Day, The Debate on the English Reformation (London: Methuen 1986), pp.  54–83; M. Bentley, Modernizing England’s Past: English Historiography in the Age of

in Making and remaking saints in nineteenth-century Britain
Alana Harris

was reprinted by the Catholic weekly The Universe in 1919. See Susan McGhee, Monsignor Taylor of Carfin (Glasgow: J. Burns, 1972), p. 176. 11 For an extended discussion of the hagiography of Saint Thérèse, see Alana Harris, Faith in the Family: A Lived Religious History of Catholicism, 1945–1982 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013), pp. 208–24. 12 Thérèse Martin, The Story of a Soul: A New Translation (Brewster: Paraclete Press, 2006), pp. 210–25. Thérèse of Lisieux 275 13 See ‘Witness 2: Thomas Nimmo Taylor’, www

in Making and remaking saints in nineteenth-century Britain
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David Geiringer

, Sex and Contraception 1800–1975 ( Oxford , 2004 ), p. 8 . 18 Ibid. 19 A. Harris , Faith in the Family: A Lived Religious History of English Catholicism, 1945–1982 ( Manchester , 2013 ), p. 5

in The Pope and the pill
David Geiringer

to Alastair Campbell’s infamous edict: ‘we don’t do God’. This is true of both neo-secularisationalists such as Brown, and of practitioners of ‘lived religious history’ – a new methodology based on critiquing the ‘constraining academic paradigms surrounding secularisation and modernity’. 21 Writers in both camps leave little or no trace of their own theological convictions, even in forewords

in The Pope and the pill
David Geiringer

. Harris , Faith in the Family: A Lived Religious History of English Catholicism, 1945–1982 ( Manchester , 2013 ). 39 Nowell, ‘Sex and Marriage’, p. 71. 40 Pope Paul VI, Humanae Vitae , p. 11. 41

in The Pope and the pill
Carmen Mangion

Folk”: Educational Reform 1944 and the Catholic Laity of England and Wales ’, History of Education , 35 ( 2006 ), 91 – 119 . 81 British Library: ‘The Young Christian Workers’ (undated), p. 3. For more on the Young Christian Workers see Sylvia Collins and Michael P. Hornsby-Smith , ‘ The Rise and Fall of the YCW in England ’, Journal of Contemporary Religion , 17 ( 2002 ), 87 – 100 . 82 Alana Harris , Faith in the Family: A Lived Religious History of English Catholicism, 1945–1982 ( Manchester : Manchester University Press , 2013 ), p

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
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‘This is your hour’
John Carter Wood

Britain: Understanding Secularisation 1800–2000 , 2nd edn (London: Routledge, 2009 [2001]); and Alana Harris, Faith in the Family: A Lived Religious History of English Catholicism, 1945–82 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013). 9 Adrian Hastings, ‘The British Churches in the War and Post-War Reconstruction’, in Andrew R. Morton (ed.), God’s Will in a Time of Crisis: A Colloquium Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Baillie Commission (Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh, 1994), pp. 4–13 (p. 4

in This is your hour
David Geiringer

/04/2012. 45 M. Eaton , ‘ What Became of the Children of Mary? ’, in M. Hornsby-Smith (ed.), Catholics in England 1950–2000: Historical and Sociological Perspectives ( London , 1999 ), p. 220 . Also see A. Harris , Faith in the Family: A Lived Religious History of English Catholicism, 1945–1982 ( Manchester , 2013

in The Pope and the pill