Search results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • "local medical men" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Medical culture and identity in provincial England, c.1760–1850
Author: Michael Brown

This book talks about late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century English medical culture, a study of what it meant to be a doctor and how this changed over time. It presents a brief overview of the social, economic and cultural landscape of late eighteenth-century York. Medical culture and identity in late eighteenth-century York took shape within a social landscape shaped by the values of gentility, polite sociability and civic belonging. The book examines the role of intellectual liberality, demonstrating how public displays of polite and 'ornamental' learning were central to the performance of medico-gentility. It explores the incipient demise of this culture. Through a close reading of a scandal which enveloped the York Lunatic Asylum, it also explores the ways in which medical identities founded upon gentility and politeness were critically undermined by the political and social factionalism. The book looks at medical involvement in the provincial scientific movement, examining how local medical men positioned themselves relative to the so-called 'march of intellect', the cultural and ideological alignment between science and social reform. It continues this analysis in relation to the cholera epidemic of 1832 and other medico-political activities. The book considers how the professional dominion over healthcare was forged by the dual processes of inclusion and exclusion. It discusses the foundation of the Medical School in 1834 against the trial, in the same year, of a local salesman for James Morison's 'Universal Vegetable Medicine'.

Abstract only
Michael Brown

body. Beginning in the 1820s with the foundation of the Yorkshire Philosophical Society, Chapter 4 looks at medical involvement in the provincial scientific movement, examining how local medical men positioned themselves relative to the so-called ‘march of intellect’, the cultural and ideological alignment between science and social reform. It then explores how, during 10 Performing medicine the debates over body-snatching and anatomical dissection which marked the late 1820s and early 1830s, medical practitioners came increasingly to claim social authority based

in Performing medicine
Assessing European health, spaces and mobilities in South-Central Africa, c.1859–c.1940
Markku Hokkanen

later editions Waller consulted and quoted doctors in Malawi, particularly Robert Laws. 12 These texts can be seen as outcomes of a co-operative network that connected a metropolitan lay expert and local medical men. Waller's health advice also drew upon the authority of medical experts among the former members of the Zambesi expedition and the UMCA: Livingstone, Kirk, the medical officer Dr Dickinson

in Medicine, mobility and the empire
Social progressivism and the transformation of provincial medicine
Michael Brown

medical men with the purchase of illegally acquired corpses. Allegedly, two men had taken a sack ‘which appeared to contain a body, to the house of a professional gentleman, not far from York, for which they demanded the usual fee’. When the sack was opened it was found that the man inside was not dead, but merely ‘dead drunk’ and had been ‘carried to the gentleman as a spice, by the worthy companions of the drunkard’.85 More seriously, perhaps, James Atkinson wrote of how the practice of anatomy could expose surgeons to acts of public violence. Lamenting popular

in Performing medicine
Samantha A. Shave

ies f ro m s canda l 201 Hawley was brought to the ‘troublesome medical contracts’ in his Hampshire unions. Of particular concern to Hawley was the eight shillings per head of population offered to the Hartley Wintney Guardians by the local medical men, a sum he thought too high.15 The Board of Guardians of the newly established Bridgwater Union had similar problems, which had far-​reaching consequences. As Kim Price has highlighted in a new examination of medical officers under the New Poor Law, the position may have been stable at a time of economic instability

in Pauper policies