Search results

Abstract only
Author: Sue Harris

Whether one 'likes' his work or not, Bertrand Blier is undisputably an important and influential presence in modern French film-making. For those who would understand the nature and function of popular French culture, it has now become impossible to ignore his work. Blier's career began in 1957 as an assistant stagiaire, as it was still relatively conventional in the French film-making tradition. This book hopes to be able to start formulating some answers to the puzzle that is Blier's work. The aim is to identify strategies for finding one's way through a body of work, which has disconcerted spectators, to identify some reference points that the curious spectator can use as a map to navigate through Blier's preferred themes and stylistic techniques. One way of understanding the system of dramatic cohesion that unifies the action of Blier's films is to read it in terms of an 'absurdist' conception. The comic momentum of Blier's films relies on the elaboration of a system of images which might be termed 'festive-ludic' or 'anarchocomic'. His deliberate attempt to go beyond the conventional limits of gender representation is as important example of the many processes of narrative subversion. Discussions reveal that the key tropes around which Blier's work is structured point to an engagement with a tradition of popular discourse, translated into both content and form, which finds an echo in the wider cultural apparatus of the post-1968 period and which is all the more significant for its location in mainstream visual culture.

Abstract only
Sue Harris

culturally marginalised traditions which have their own aesthetic and historical value. The discussion will reveal that the key tropes around which Blier’s work is structured point to an engagement with a tradition of popular discourse, here translated into both content and form, which finds an echo in the wider cultural apparatus of the post-1968 period, and which is all the more significant for its location in mainstream visual

in Bertrand Blier
Abstract only
Des O’Rawe

was clearly involved with that loose but more politically active ensemble of filmmakers, photographers, and writers who comprised the Left Bank Group. Fashion­/spectacle Inevitably, New York street photography would sooner or later become conventional despite itself, and be assimilated into mainstream visual culture­– ­and from there into banality. Inspired by wartime photojournalism, and encouraged by the post-­war surge in magazine sales, street photographers in the 1950s resembled urban combatants, producing images that belonged to the same heady cultural moment

in Regarding the real
Thomas J. Moretti

communication continued to play a role in mainstream Protestant culture; and, conversely … post-​Reformation religion continued to have a place in the mainstream visual culture’ (p. 136). Watt points to A schole-​house for the needle (London, 1624) as an example of continued iconography in Jacobean England. Ladies who used the guidebook ‘embroidered not only unicorns, peacocks, flowers and abstract designs, but scenes of Adam and Eve, the pelican in her piety, and even the crucifixion’ (p. 137; A schole-​house, sigs. A2–​A4).  140 140 Negotiating confessional conflict 20

in Forms of faith
Abstract only
Sian Barber

for further research. Barber.indd 109 3/2/2015 4:14:34 PM 110 using film as a source This list of key resources which has been briefly compiled here for British cinema can serve as a template for other topics. Similar lists could easily be compiled for any other national cinema or indeed for television. Identifying lists of resources that relate to topics such as alternative cinema, avant-garde film or newsreels may be more complicated. As a starting point for these topics it is again useful to think about periodisation and to read about the mainstream visual

in Using film as a source