Search results

Jonathan Rayner

Australian-ness and masculinity The male ensemble film, in its first phase up to Breaker Morant (1980), is also strongly influenced by the posture of the ocker; blunt, loud, hedonistic and conservative in the populist manner. Its working class or lower middle-class male ligure is not an appeal for class solidarity, but a gesture towards the classless common man as last bastion of ‘real’ Australian virtues and vices … the assertive use of vernacular is empowered by the feeling it is breaking with old

in Contemporary Australian cinema
An introduction
Editor: Jonathan Rayner

This book offers introductory readings of some of the well-known and less well-known feature productions coming out of Australia since the revival in the national film industry at the end of the 1960s. The interpretations of the texts and the careers of their makers are considered in relation to the emergence of an indigenous film culture and the construction of national identity. The majority of the films examined in the book have had theatrical or video releases in the UK. The independent development of several indigenous film genres has been an important feature of recent production, and helped to punctuate and bracket the streams of feature production that have evolved since 1970. These Australian genres have been identified and evaluated (the Australian Gothic, the period film, the male ensemble film) and are worthy of consideration both in their own right and in their intersection with other conventionalised forms. These include science fiction, fantasy and horror in comparison with the Gothic, the heritage film and literary adaptation in connection with the period film, and the war film and rite of passage in relation to the male ensemble. More recently, an aesthetic and thematic trend has emerged in the examples of Strictly Ballroom, The Adventures of Priscilla, and Muriel's Wedding, which foregrounds elements of the camp, the kitsch and the retrospective idolisation of 1970s Glamour. Such chronological, stylistic and thematic groupings are important in the interpretation of national filmmaking.

Abstract only
Jonathan Rayner

unless, as the representation of Australian subjugation under colonial authority in films depicting educational, military and religious control suggests, defeatism and the surrendering of self-determination is itself a communal characteristic. This pessimistic estimation of human potential flows over from films set in the past to narratives portraying the endeavours of male individuals and groups (the ‘male ensemblefilms), many of which also adopt the characteristics of the AFC genre. Poised between the qualified heroics of

in Contemporary Australian cinema
Abstract only
Jonathan Rayner

colonial past (such as Picnic at Hanging Rock or The Getting of Wisdom ). The male ensemble films represent an extension to the images of masculinity established in the first group and a codicil to the period film’s depiction of female experience. National character is explored through communal activities undertaken by composite heroes, with the stereotypical characteristics validated by their portrayal across and incarnation by groups rather than emblematic individuals. The groups’ frequent involvement in historical events of

in Contemporary Australian cinema
Abstract only
Jonathan Rayner

genres is a major trend within the Australian revival. Additionally, the independent development of several indigenous film genres has been an important feature of recent production, and has helped to punctuate and bracket the streams of feature production that have evolved since 1970. These Australian genres have been identified and evaluated (the Australian Gothic, the period film, the male ensemble film 32 ) and are worthy of consideration both in their own right and in their intersection with other conventionalised forms (science

in Contemporary Australian cinema